Profile For andhe78

andhe78's Info

  • Location:
    Buffalo, NY

  • Driving Status:
    Experienced Driver

  • Social Link:

  • Joined Us:
    4 years, 1 month ago

andhe78's Bio

I’ve got gas.

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Posted:  1 month, 1 week ago

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Making a major mover

Interesting, keep us informed of how it’s going. I too graduated from a cdl school and was always appreciative of the working drivers that would come in in their days off to help train. I see NTTS here in Buffalo is looking for instructors, and have been thinking about applying part time, as a way to pay it forward. I’m curious how it will go for you.

Posted:  1 month, 3 weeks ago

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Brakes just caught on fire and burned trailer.

I've been thinking about this thread my last couple of shifts, because I haul this weight every day too. Honestly, if the only trailer you pulled before starting this job was an empty one you used to take the road test, then you don't have the experience to know whether or not you were using too much brake. You Were Using Too Much Brake. It's something that surprised me moving to overweight from flatbed-how fast your brakes can heat up, even with a couple extra sets on the trailer. All it took was a quick slow down on an off ramp and a few stops in city traffic, and I could smell them (but that's the thing-I know what hot brakes smell like, I can't believe you didn't smell anything.) I had to change my driving style-level three jakes all the time loaded, no playing the stale green game, looking further ahead to plan for longer stopping distances, etc. I honestly don't touch my brakes (unless emergency stop) until my speed is in the teens. My jakes are doing all the work. When I break over a hill, I am in the gear and at the speed I want to be in for the ride down. (Ignore cars behind you, put on your flashers.) If you're starting down a hill at 55 and brake down to 40ish when momentum has a hold on you, you aren't going to have enough brake left to stab on the way down (which I do very little of, too.) You're happy with 5-10 under the limit, but that is really nothing, I've got a couple hills I'm 40 under at that weight.

I also find it interesting the owner thinks you aren't to blame (wonder if he'll change his tune if you decide to apply elsewhere.) If I were to smoke a set of brakes tonight, I'm pretty sure my boss, my peers, and even I would believe it was my fault. And even if it was a mechanical thing, I should have noticed something wrong before reaching the ignition stage, or noticed it on a check. Did you do a check before leaving the quarry? Not that the weight is extreme, but I do a check every time I'm stopped and out of the truck just to help prevent incidents due to mechanical failures (our tankers have several more air line points of failure than most trailers.)

Disc or drum?

Posted:  1 month, 3 weeks ago

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Please help me decide between 2 companies

I love my tanker job. I haul chemicals, not fuel but I really do enjoy it. It is not for new drivers. You need experirnce and to develop your driving skills before you tackle that.

I'll second this. Just finished my fourth winter driving, and had a shift a few months back with a 70% full smoothbore grossing 116k, where the weather and secondary road I was on was so bad, that I have no doubt I'd have been in a ditch or worse if I'd tried it in my first couple years. Don't do it.

Posted:  2 months ago

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Trailers

They’re not legal in all the states. Here we do 107k on three and 117k on four. You’ll see a ton of multi axles in Canada.

Posted:  2 months, 1 week ago

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Prime Inc is disabling Manual Mode on their trucks with the D12 Manual Automatic Transmission !

As a tanker I live by manual mode when taking off, especially when starting going up a hill. The economy mode that is default wants to skip shift because the way the liquid surges. This causes issues if it skip shifts from say 2-4 when taking off the truck will wont have enough power to move and you will come to a dead stop as the transmission finds the right gear now that the liquid has surged back onto the drives. Even Peterbilt has said “the way Prime has the ecm programmed for tankers is killing these trucks.” I’m l/o so I will still have my manual mode, but company tankers deal with chaos multiple times a day.

But what's interesting is, I run much heaver tanks than anything Prime has, every day with an auto Pete, and have never had these issues. It's drivers not willing to learn how to finesse an auto these days that's the problem.

And that's my unpopular opinion of the day.😊

Posted:  2 months, 1 week ago

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Nation catching on to consequences of truck driver shortage

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I reached out to pilot flying j because they're hiring in my area. 23/hr 1730 to 0530. The hours suck and the money isn't great. I'd do it if it were 0530 to 1730, but for those hours I would need to be paid more.

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Sheetz is looking for tankers. Pay is about $29hr. About what FXF pays City Drivers. Have no idea what the bennies are. Might be worth looking into.

Sheetz isn't bad, Speedway and Sunoco are good too. Sunoco drivers are mid thirties around here. If the nights aren't good for you though, probably shouldn't even look at fuel hauling. Pretty much guaranteed you'll start at night anywhere you go-it's the nature of the beast in this game. That being said though.....I was leery about working nights too, until I did it. At this point (and having done this job on days for a few month filling in), you'd have to pay me more to go to days. I've turned down several day positions simply because this job is so enjoyable at night. Everything that sucks about fuel hauling, disappears when the sun goes down.

Posted:  2 months, 1 week ago

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Log question

My trainer did the same thing one week. On our last day out of the week, we got hung up at a receiver longer than expected and were on duty the whole time. Ended up going to be about an hour short on the seventy to get home. Changing one of the on duty hours to off duty gave us back an hour on the seventy and allowed us to get home. How I differ from you, is that I saw it as a great learning experience about how important it is to be stingy with my 70, whereas you saw it as a way to get your trainer in trouble.

Posted:  2 months, 3 weeks ago

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What makes local truck driving so appealing to drivers VS Over the road?

Moe, PLEASE read Daniel B.'s posts, from his fuel hauling days; tread lightly.

I know fuel hauling gets a bad rap on this site due to those posts, but it can actually be a really great job for certain drivers and with the right company. I enjoy it and have no thoughts of going elsewhere.

Posted:  2 months, 3 weeks ago

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What makes local truck driving so appealing to drivers VS Over the road?

Pay, home daily, no worrying about finding parking, easily available bathrooms, not being married to the truck 24/7, having 2 days off a week, more predictable schedule.

Gotta agree with all these points. I had no real problems while otr, but also have no desire to go back to it either.

Posted:  2 months, 3 weeks ago

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How does local driver navigate themself ?

Banks has it completely right-your fellow drivers are going to be your greatest asset for directions. Run google maps too, because you're right too, the trucker's gps and atlas will not get you right down into the side streets you're going to be on. Starting local, I knew the main routes that would get me in the general vicinity, then would use google maps to figure out a route in, then ask my fellow drivers if that route was feasible, and go from there. I was lucky a couple ways though, a 20+ year guy works my same shift and is always happy to answer any questions, and my company has spent the last ninety years building up "surveys" of every place we go to that has route info, contacts, hours, tank locations and sizes, and even the best way to pull in and unload at most places.

I understand what you're talking about not having time to trip plan-my loads are often not dispatched before my start time, so I'd just plan the first leg, then during the load/unload, plan the next leg, and so on. I'd never plan the whole trip right at the start since we often have to switch stops throughout the shift. It gets easier though as you become more familiar with the area, just keep at it. Don't look at your whole stack of work at the start of the shift (other than for a quick overview) and get overwhelmed trying to plan it all out, just take it in small chunks, and keep working through it until you're done.

I'd also be very careful calling the customers for directions, don't know how many times I've gotten someone that know how they get to work in their car, but has no idea about truck routes.

Posted:  3 months ago

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Company CDL school tuition

You owe Roehl $6500, because the story of how you got fired sounds fishy to anyone who’s experienced a preventable at their starter company.

Posted:  3 months, 3 weeks ago

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Local driving: new trends

I'm a local driver, and you're right, a brand new driver can get a local job with no experience. But there's a hierarchy in local work (not talking about seniority.) I'll bet I can guess what you'll be doing because it's the same few types of local outfits everywhere that will hire drivers with no experience (or brand new drivers with a preventable already)-they're frankly the bottom of the local barrel. Not that that's a horrible thing though, for example, my company requires two years experience, yet I'm the only one at my yard with over the road experience-so all these drivers got their experience with local jobs, then moved on. You're just going to need to be VERY, VERY careful. There's no room for error and you'll probably be doing more city driving and backing in a day than an otr guy will do in a month. And if it's the type of company that doesn't care if you knock off a mirror, then I'd be willing to bet their equipment is barely road legal and now you're dealing with violations. Honestly, most of the new drivers that make it out of these types of local jobs did so more with luck than skill. I wish you luck, and would probably look for a night driving local gig first, if you're determined to go this route.

Posted:  3 months, 3 weeks ago

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A few questions from a prospective trucker (plus a little intro)

4) I have become familiar with the hours of service (11 driving/14 on duty for a 24 hour period, on top of 70 driving hours for every 8 days requires a 34 hour reset). Although, I keep reading about getting ours "back". Am I right in assuming that means if I drive less than 70 hours in those 8 days I get the remaining hours back during the 34 hour reset (ex. 65 hours driven gives me 5 hours back)? Again, I'm sure my trainer will happily show me the ropes.

The best advice I can give you about this is find the study section on this site about HOS, and study, study, study it. It took me probably two weeks of reading and thinking and practicing the study aids on this site before it started clicking. I even picked up a log book and practiced the scenarios, just to help me figure out the rules and how they could be applied. Counting on your trainer is one way to go about getting the training, but you'd be amazed at the ignorance of the rules out here. I taught both my trainers different ways the rules can be applied that they didn't know, simply from what I learned and practiced from this site. No reason to depend on a stranger for all your training, when you can teach yourself. I've scoured the web for training on HOS rules because I'm all about maximizing my paycheck, and this knowledge is one of the simplest ways to increase productivity, and this site is the best. You're already heading towards some wrong ideas based on your paragraph here. For example, a "24 hour period" has absolutely nothing to do with your hours (in the states, anyway), and a 34 will give you all your hours back, no matter when you take it.

Posted:  3 months, 3 weeks ago

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Trucking With A Partner- Prime

I'm actually in a new Pete and would much rather be in my former '17 freightliner. Personal preference, but the Pete just seems less comfortable overall to me.

Posted:  3 months, 3 weeks ago

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Website ranks carriers by driver pay - Sysco at the top

Sysco is much more physical than the other jobs and the speed you unload directly affects your pay. Unloading 300 cases into 1 stop you're able to earn a higher wage because you're not wasting time touching other stops cases trying to find cases coming off right now

I thought Sysco was hourly, in which case the speed you unload affects your pay, but in the opposite direction you're thinking of. I'm hourly, and make more on a three stop run than a single drop, simply because it takes me longer. It's honestly my biggest gripe working an hourly job, the guys milking it make more than the hustlers.

I could be wrong about their pay structure though, where's our Sysco guy?

Posted:  4 months, 2 weeks ago

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Home time for rookies!

Keep in mind though that if the truck has to sit longer than I believe 3 weeks or so you have to turn it back in.

It’s two weeks. After 14 days, Maverick will send someone to get the truck.

Posted:  4 months, 3 weeks ago

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Crossing border as a passenger

Canadian border is still closed to nonessentials, which you are in your scenario.

Posted:  4 months, 3 weeks ago

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To hazmat or not to hazmat

You are also required to go through yearly hazmat training with your employer.

Your company may have done it yearly, but recurrent hazmat training is only required every three years, or when there’s a significant change to the rules.

I could dive deeper into the rules (like rr crossings controlled by a traffic signal), but since Oldschool likes things kept simple, I’ll just add a tidbit I find interesting. Putting your bol in the correct page of your erg isn’t mandatory, but is often done around here because a dot officer can ask a driver to show knowledge of his erg by asking him to look up his load in the book. Bol in the right page will solve that. And before I hear that that’s an old wive’s tale, one of our drivers got a violation just last month because he couldn’t find his loaded product in the erg-what makes this situation even dumber is the un code for all the products we haul are on our placards.

Posted:  4 months, 3 weeks ago

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To hazmat or not to hazmat

Got your erg?

Posted:  4 months, 3 weeks ago

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Best backing videos on YouTube?

I fear that backing will be difficult too for me as i suck at times with a small bike trailer and pickup

This is actually an unfair assessment of your backing skills when it comes to a tractor/trailer. Believe it or not, the smaller a trailer is, the harder it is to back since it responds so fast. I had my brother in law’s snowmobile trailer take me three pull ups the other day-turn the wheel a fraction....and it’s jackknifing! Don’t psych yourself out before you ever get in the truck.

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