Profile For andhe78

andhe78's Info

  • Location:
    NY

  • Driving Status:
    Experienced Driver

  • Social Link:

  • Joined Us:
    2 years, 5 months ago

andhe78's Bio

Former Maverick.

Now hauling hazmat supertankers as a local driver.

andhe78's Photo Gallery

Page 1 of 15

Next Page
Go To Page:    

Posted:  19 hours, 59 minutes ago

View Topic:

WWYD?

You can also click on anyone's name and it will show you the pictures they have posted if you scroll down. Say for instance they have a picture of a check stub.^🙄 Of their six figures.🤔

Lol, gonna have to do better than that. That 52k picture was in reply to someone asking about FIRST year wages. That’s my first ten months and I made that clear. Those 1900 weekly stubs, that was to show what I was bringing in as a second year driver and that was to back up another flatbed driver who no one believed was bringing in those kind of numbers. 1900 a week average is pretty dang close to six figures a year. And going into my third year, the numbers keep getting better. So what’s the problem here?

Posted:  20 hours, 12 minutes ago

View Topic:

Vent & Brag for the week

This is a weird one, but hit my first deer this week, and handled the situation properly by ignoring my first instinct to swerve and instead just kept straight on. It’s actually a serious problem here due to our location, times of day we run, and routes we travel, especially this time of year. The company plans for every driver to get at least two a year, and they train to not swerve. Wasn’t sure I could go against my first reaction, and was pretty happy the training kicked in.

Posted:  20 hours, 31 minutes ago

View Topic:

My First Day With My Mentor And Not Sure If I Need To Do More

This talk about driving around buildings reminds me of my recent training in a new driving job as a fuel hauler. It would drive my trainer crazy that I’d jump out and look before driving around an unfamiliar location. He finally told me “I have over twenty years driving into these same stations-if I tell you to drive around behind a station, do it.” So I did, but as soon as I got out on my own, it was right back to hopping out to check stuff if it was unfamiliar. Kind of funny.

Posted:  20 hours, 47 minutes ago

View Topic:

WWYD?

Usually people who go into trucking strictly for the money end up getting out of trucking for the same reason. You need to have a better motivation than the financial one.

I’ve always disagreed with this site about this and have felt you guys romanticize the job too much. I need more than “adventure” to deal with rude drivers, or crazy four wheelers, or ridiculous weather, or disgusting toilets, or months away from loved ones on a daily basis. A six figure income helps with that.

I literally got into trucking for the money, and you can’t say I haven’t been extremely successful in this career. As a guy with only a high school diploma, why would I get out of trucking when it allows me a very comfortable lifestyle?

Posted:  21 hours, 7 minutes ago

View Topic:

Prepaid legal services/insurance plan

I had it during my time on the road. Only used it once, but the results made it probably the best $2.50 a week I’ve ever spent. Still have a driver legal service, but it’s through the union now.

Posted:  3 weeks ago

View Topic:

Petroleum Driving Advice Needed

How do border crossings usually go nowadays? Could you elaborate on the annoyance factor a bit? Do you have a FAST card?

We do not have fast. Honestly, the annoyance factor is totally due to traffic and wait times. I’ve waited hours to get over one of the bridges before.

Our terminal runs over twenty trucks in and out of Canada multiple times a day, so it’s very smooth and the border agents are familiar with us. We’ll get sent through the X-ray now and then, and I’ve been dot inspected once on the border, but most days it’s just a matter of minutes. My Monday load has me crossing into Canada, then Michigan to pick up a load then back again. Will be no trouble as long as my paperwork is in order-that will get you hung up for hours too.

Ninety percent of the time going either way it’s simply pulling up, handing over my enhanced license and whichever crossing manifest is needed, answering a question or two, then going on my way.

Posted:  3 weeks ago

View Topic:

Petroleum Driving Advice Needed

Hey Jeff, I've now been hauling gas, fuel, propane, etc. in tri and quad axle trailers for a couple of months, and while obviously not super experienced, can share some thoughts. Also, my experiences will not be the same with every company in every location (snow and Canada being things you'll never have to deal with.)

I'm not sure what you're getting at with your pay question. I am payed hourly with time and a half over forty, so it's pretty straight forward. I get paid thirty minutes a day total to pre and post trip and fuel, but can get paid extra if I have to say add fluids or arrange shop time simply by sending a macro. Most days average ten hours at this terminal, but I can request another local load to bump up my hours daily if I want. I get two days off in a row guaranteed every week, but can work the sixth day any time I want. We've got guys who work fifty hours a week, and others that work seventy every week-some do the seventy in five days, and others stretch it into six-so there is plenty of flexibility. Our terminal just has to make sure to get a 36 hour reset every week since we're constantly in and out of Canada.

Pro's and Con's? Honestly, after two months, haven't found a serious con. Winter is coming, so it's going to get cold, and driving is going to suck, but I've lived and worked in it my entire life and it is what it is. A lot of the con's I hear about this job are no big deal to me-some examples. Surge in the tankers-doesn't affect propane, or even gas since our gas trailers have compartments and we run them maxed out. The only time I'll feel a little something is hauling diesel since it's heavier and there is more empty space in the compartments. Hauling a bomb strapped to your tractor-it's something I don't think about, it's just another load I'm hauling, and since I always drove carefully anyway, my driving habits haven't really changed. I've had some flatbed load that worried me a lot more than a load of fuel. Backing into stations and dealing with cars-can almost guarantee you that you'll start out working the night shift, which makes these annoyances easier to deal with. I start work around 1500 every day, so after dealing with some afternoon rush hour the first load, the rest of the shift is a piece of cake. It also helps that I work out of a small market (can get from one side of my city to the other in thirty minutes) and we do a ton of rural work. Also, we run way heavy out of my terminal, so I'm rarely off major roads. Conversely, snow will be falling shortly, so will have to see how that will make things more difficult. A lot of people don't like working a night shift, but my wife works the same shift, so will probably stay here even if a day spot opens up. As for the backing thing, in two month I've backed into or out of stations TWICE. Again, that just may be because of our market, or our company primarily dealing with larger, newer stations, or the night shift, but I can literally feel my backing skills starting to atrophy. Seriously, after maneuvering and backing a spread axle daily in all of the big cities in this country for two years, getting a day cab in and out of these stations is not a big deal, border crossing are a much bigger annoyance for me. As for pro's-I've got a short commute and am home daily. I'm driving a brand new 2020 Pete. Fantastic money and benefits. No heavy lifting. Always busy. All the hours I want. Plus, we have quite a bit of variety-I'm all over Western New York, and into Canada and Pennsylvania regularly. For example, propane season is starting, so my first two days are going to be 500 mile round trips to pick up and deliver a single load of propane. Then I'll be delivering to stations for a couple days, then it looks like pulling a single load across the state for another driver to deliver. I'll probably have close to seventy hours in five days, but that's because dispatch knows I like to run. I'm enjoying it so far, although like I said, winter may drop my enjoyment level a bit.

The hardest thing for me about this job is not the driving, it's the loading and unloading (not the physical aspect of it.) If you are carrying five compartments with different amounts of different products for different stations, you really need to be paying attention to what you are doing and double checking everything. Overall though, I am very happy with my decision to go local fuel hauling. I loved flatbed and loved Maverick, but being home all the time is very nice.

Posted:  1 month ago

View Topic:

Melton truck lines

Got to remember, flatbed pays more but you’ll get fewer miles. I’d be willing to bet you’ll make less your first six months flatbedding because you’re spending so much time tarping and securing.

I made more on flatbed than most dry van guys because I hustled and was super stingy with my clock, but I’ve found the average flatbedder and the average door slammer made the same amount even though the cpm’s were quite different.

Posted:  1 month, 2 weeks ago

View Topic:

Almost got rear ended driving training truck

I'd be interested to know how others handle this occurence. I cant slow down too much because then I risk really getting stuck in that lane as everyone passes me on the right.

Probably get some flack for this, but I very rarely leave my lane for merging four wheelers. Lane changing was one of our biggest causes of accidents, so I use throttle control instead. If the car coming down will reach the dotted lines before me, I let off the throttle a bit and they merge in front of me. If I’m going to get to the dotted line before them, I keep on it and they can work in behind me. If it’s a steady flow off the ramp, traffic is probably too busy to get over anyway, or I’m already in the next lane over because it’s three or more lanes and they can work themselves in around me. I will get over for trucks though, though I often just fall in behind them too since they’re usually faster than me anyway.

Posted:  1 month, 2 weeks ago

View Topic:

Hazmat Endorsement

Bill, no you do not have to have your CDL yet, but you do need to have your fingerprints & background check completed before you take the HAZMAT endorsement test.

Actually, he’s going to want to check with his state’s dmv-here you did have to have your cdl before they would even let you start the hazmat process. It seems to vary by state.

Posted:  1 month, 2 weeks ago

View Topic:

Still struggling to understand HOS

First you have daily rules: you can't be on duty more than 14 hours.

Probably one of the biggest fallacies I see out here-you can literally be on duty nonstop for a week, just have to take a ten before you can drive again.

Posted:  1 month, 3 weeks ago

View Topic:

Qualcomm DOT -12:40

And to simplify the 10 hour break you can just put the entire 10 hours or longer on sleeper without changing to off duty for part of it but have to have at least 8 out of ten uninterrupted hours in sleeper.

This is inaccurate. If your talking about the eight hour portion of a split, then that does have to be in sleeper berth. But you seem to be talking about the ten hour break and that can all be done in sleeper, off duty, or a mix of the two.

Posted:  1 month, 3 weeks ago

View Topic:

The secrets to flatbed.

Do your load checks.

Posted:  1 month, 3 weeks ago

View Topic:

What to bring with you

I’ve seen what guys leave in those sinks, disposable dishes for me.

Found a turd in a washing machine once. What impressed me was it was a front loader, seems like the angle would have been difficult.

Posted:  1 month, 3 weeks ago

View Topic:

Want to lose weight? Try flatbed

May lose some weight the first few months, but once you get it down, the job is not hard. Half hour/forty-five minutes walking around the trailer setting straps/chains, unrolling a tarp, then setting bungees. In two years only had to lift lumber tarps over my head three times, and that was just because I could do it and was in a hurry. Tarp machines and forklift drivers will set the heavy tarps pretty much every time.

I had to drastically change my diet going from an actually very physically demanding job to flatbedding, just wasn’t burning the calories I used to.

Posted:  1 month, 3 weeks ago

View Topic:

The Highway Bottleneck Awards, 2019

So happy that the only one of those I’ll see anymore is number 99 on the list. 😄

Posted:  1 month, 3 weeks ago

View Topic:

Got my CDL A. Auto or manual truck job?

Thank you. If ever i will get an auto transmission job. What if few years later i decided to find better paying company. Wouldn't be harder for me to get job because i still have no exprience on manuals? Lots of companies looking for drivers that experienced in manual transmission.

I have some very recent experience in this exact situation. Got my cdl with no restrictions, then never touched a manual for almost two years. Went in to interview with a local company and did a road test. Ground a couple of gears, but it was nothing major, the interviewer was looking more that I was comfortable getting a truck down the road.

Funny thing was, they are trying to switch to autos with all the safety features and their drivers are throwing fits about it because they are constantly setting off the audible warnings. Was actually asked if I would have a problem driving an auto with adaptive cruise control, lane departure, etc I just laughed and replied that that was all I’d driven for two years, and that once you learn to drive so that the warnings don’t go off..........the warnings don’t go off.

Got the job and a brand new 2020 with my name on it.

Posted:  2 months ago

View Topic:

Test date on the 26th. Looking like I’ll be a professional truck driver. Questions on trip planning

Still have to watch clearances, there are two places I can think of off the top of my head that we have to go in a certain way because bridges are too low. I’ve routinely hauled loads at 13’6” and had a few lumber and pipe loads that had to be reworked due to over height.

I used the Rand McNally 740 with no problems, then google maps satellite view once I got in close. Maverick also is good about company directions, probably 70% of the places we go, the company has truck directions on how to get in legally. There is also a very good Facebook page for maverick drivers that has a steadily growing database of how to get places, how to check in, etc.

Posted:  2 months ago

View Topic:

Thinking About Leaving Schneider

You know, the first question that springs to mind is you can’t be the only guy on this account, what are the other guys doing that haul these loads?

Posted:  2 months ago

View Topic:

Thinking About Leaving Schneider

Not my picture, but this is an example. I’ve hauled many loose boxes on pallets with a similar setup and no issues.

0797900001568600409.jpg

Page 1 of 15

Next Page
Go To Page:    

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More