Automatic Trucks, How Do You Like Them?

Topic 10389 | Page 1

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New Beginning's Comment
member avatar

I haven't quite mastered driving trucks yet and am really beginning to get annoyed with myself whenever I grind a gear. Some days I drive like I have been doing this for ten years. Other days it's like I just started yesterday. I am curious as to how those of you that drive automatics like them. It seems like automatics would cut down on a lot of stress, especially when going through bumper to bumper traffic. Worrying about rpms, speed, how far to push on the clutch, and how heavy the load is really takes away from concentration on the road for me. The changing shifting points, and the dreaded climbing up hills is so frustrating.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
guyjax(Guy Hodges)'s Comment
member avatar

I drive an automatic now. While there is less stress the only difference is the truck shifts for you.

It's the weight of the load that causes you to be slow on a hill. Not the shifting. Automatics have the same issue. They are slow on a hill due to the weight.

The Persian Conversion's Comment
member avatar

giphy.gif

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

I drove standards for a bunch of years and then automatics (auto-shift, actually) with US Xpress. I loved the automatics. You can still switch to manual mode and select gears the way you would with a standard but of course you have the luxury of letting the transmission do the work most of the time.

Experienced drivers always freak out about the idea the first time but once they drive them for a little while they usually love em.

New Beginning's Comment
member avatar

I drive an automatic now. While there is less stress the only difference is the truck shifts for you.

It's the weight of the load that causes you to be slow on a hill. Not the shifting. Automatics have the same issue. They are slow on a hill due to the weight.

Well do you like it? I talked to a guy who had been driving for 40 yrs the last 12 with an automatic and he said he would never go back to driving a stick. I understand the weight slows you down,and speeds you up on hills, but the shifting from ten, to nine, to eight,to seven, to the dreaded sixth burns me up. And then shifting back up. I have a great appreciation for all you longtime truckers. I couldn't imagine not having cruise control. If they could only install self cancelled turn signal, hahaha. Sometimes I am worse than my grandma with that darn signal. Persian, love the meme.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

I haven't quite mastered driving trucks yet and am really beginning to get annoyed with myself whenever I grind a gear. Some days I drive like I have been doing this for ten years. Other days it's like I just started yesterday. I am curious as to how those of you that drive automatics like them. It seems like automatics would cut down on a lot of stress, especially when going through bumper to bumper traffic. Worrying about rpms, speed, how far to push on the clutch, and how heavy the load is really takes away from concentration on the road for me. The changing shifting points, and the dreaded climbing up hills is so frustrating.

Swift seems to be moving to an "all" automatic fleet as they purchase new trucks. I started driving one back in July. I must admit at first I was not a fan, perhaps my ego got in the way, not sure. Since I am a dedicated driver on the Walmart account, I spend a good bit of my time in heavy traffic, so it did not take me very long to change my tune. Although it took some getting used to it (what to do with my left foot, etc.), I am of the same thought as several other posts, I would not go back. Don't get me wrong, I enjoy shifting, but at the end of a long day I seem to be far less fatigued with the automatic.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
New Beginning's Comment
member avatar
double-quotes-start.png

I haven't quite mastered driving trucks yet and am really beginning to get annoyed with myself whenever I grind a gear. Some days I drive like I have been doing this for ten years. Other days it's like I just started yesterday. I am curious as to how those of you that drive automatics like them. It seems like automatics would cut down on a lot of stress, especially when going through bumper to bumper traffic. Worrying about rpms, speed, how far to push on the clutch, and how heavy the load is really takes away from concentration on the road for me. The changing shifting points, and the dreaded climbing up hills is so frustrating.

double-quotes-end.png

Swift seems to be moving to an "all" automatic fleet as they purchase new trucks. I started driving one back in July. I must admit at first I was not a fan, perhaps my ego got in the way, not sure. Since I am a dedicated driver on the Walmart account, I spend a good bit of my time in heavy traffic, so it did not take me very long to change my tune. Although it took some getting used to it (what to do with my left foot, etc.), I am of the same thought as several other posts, I would not go back. Don't get me wrong, I enjoy shifting, but at the end of a long day I seem to be far less fatigued with the automatic.

I almost went to Swift for my training, but I felt I needed more on the job training so I am at Prime. Sometimes I think I would have been better off with the shorter training cause being stuck in a truck for four months with someone is challenging. But anyway way, is the pay at Swift about average to other major carriers? I also chose Prime because after 6 months I can by out my tuition for $1600, if I am not happy with my situation. My trainer says he doesn't think Prime will be getting automatics anytime soon. But when I get back to the terminal I sure will be asking.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar
double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

I haven't quite mastered driving trucks yet and am really beginning to get annoyed with myself whenever I grind a gear. Some days I drive like I have been doing this for ten years. Other days it's like I just started yesterday. I am curious as to how those of you that drive automatics like them. It seems like automatics would cut down on a lot of stress, especially when going through bumper to bumper traffic. Worrying about rpms, speed, how far to push on the clutch, and how heavy the load is really takes away from concentration on the road for me. The changing shifting points, and the dreaded climbing up hills is so frustrating.

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

Swift seems to be moving to an "all" automatic fleet as they purchase new trucks. I started driving one back in July. I must admit at first I was not a fan, perhaps my ego got in the way, not sure. Since I am a dedicated driver on the Walmart account, I spend a good bit of my time in heavy traffic, so it did not take me very long to change my tune. Although it took some getting used to it (what to do with my left foot, etc.), I am of the same thought as several other posts, I would not go back. Don't get me wrong, I enjoy shifting, but at the end of a long day I seem to be far less fatigued with the automatic.

double-quotes-end.png

I almost went to Swift for my training, but I felt I needed more on the job training so I am at Prime. Sometimes I think I would have been better off with the shorter training cause being stuck in a truck for four months with someone is challenging. But anyway way, is the pay at Swift about average to other major carriers? I also chose Prime because after 6 months I can by out my tuition for $1600, if I am not happy with my situation. My trainer says he doesn't think Prime will be getting automatics anytime soon. But when I get back to the terminal I sure will be asking.

Sent you a PM (private message) on this...G

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
miracleofmagick's Comment
member avatar

When I first got my automatic, I didn't care for it very much, but then I got into my first traffic jam with it. It started growing on me real fast at that point. Now that I'm used to it, I like it a lot.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

New Beginning's Comment
member avatar

As I look through trucker magazines at truckstops I notice a lot of trucking companies are pointing out they are ordering new trucks and emphasizing automatics. I guess driver comfort is the at top of trucking companies to lure in newer drivers.

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