New Prime Driver

Topic 10548 | Page 1

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Mark P.'s Comment
member avatar

Hello everyone, Out on the road as a solo company driver for Prime for a month now. I have to say I'm happy with the job and the pay, but not with having to run slow. I try to be as polite as I can...stay in the right lane...flash the lights to let others know they're around me etc. I plan to put in the year with Prime to honor my commitment for the training and look for a company that has trucks that at least run the speed limit. All this being said I am not a total FNG. I drove straight trucks interstate in the Southeast for 20 years. Just chose Prime as the best option for myself as a way to learn the nuts n bolts of handling a Big Truck. Look forward to mixing it up with you on the forums!

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Robert W.'s Comment
member avatar

I have only been looking recently at OTR jobs and have no experience driving but I have got my class A CDL here in Texas. I've seen PRIME equipment on the road and was wondering about a job with them. Where is their training facility and do they have much business in the Southwest? Any info would be great.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Welcome to Trucking Truth, Mark! Shoulda started here sooner. Oh well.

I doubt if you'll find large company (the kind with all the benefits, miles and loads) that does not limit the speed on their fleet. Lower speeds mean safer drivers (and insurance $$) and better fuel mileage (5000 trucks x 0.001 per mile x 500 miles each day adds up.*)

And you may find Prime isn't too shabby a an employer anyway. Maybe you miss those ungoverned straight boxes, but 80,000 lb. semis roll different. Sounds like you're working to be a safe driver. That will work to your advantage. And you have 11 more months to think it over.

* sorry for the numbers, I used to be a math teacher.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Mark P.'s Comment
member avatar

I have only been looking recently at OTR jobs and have no experience driving but I have got my class A CDL here in Texas. I've seen PRIME equipment on the road and was wondering about a job with them. Where is their training facility and do they have much business in the Southwest? Any info would be great.

Robert Prime would require orientation and time with a trainer on the road if I'm not mistaken. Their main terminal for training is Springfield MO but there is also a smaller one in Salt Lake City. I have run the Southwest quite a bit but they will send you anywhere. Since May of this year I have been in 46 of the lower 48 states. Good luck and hope that helps!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Mark P.'s Comment
member avatar

Welcome to Trucking Truth, Mark! Shoulda started here sooner. Oh well.

I doubt if you'll find large company (the kind with all the benefits, miles and loads) that does not limit the speed on their fleet. Lower speeds mean safer drivers (and insurance $$) and better fuel mileage (5000 trucks x 0.001 per mile x 500 miles each day adds up.*)

And you may find Prime isn't too shabby a an employer anyway. Maybe you miss those ungoverned straight boxes, but 80,000 lb. semis roll different. Sounds like you're working to be a safe driver. That will work to your advantage. And you have 11 more months to think it over.

* sorry for the numbers, I used to be a math teacher.

Thanks Errol I don't really want to be a speed king... I was just in Wyoming having to run 22 miles below the speed limit and at times felt like a bit of a road hazard. I may be taking comments from other drivers about the slow trucks too personally.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Miss Miyoshi's Comment
member avatar

I had seen what Prime tops their driver speeds at, and I was actually wondering how that played out on interstates that have 70mph or 75mph speed limits. Safety first, of course, but in some cases being that much slower can be a hazard itself. Do drivers ever run into any traffic enforcement issues with truck speed, or do police officers generally understand the speed cap?

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar
Thanks Errol I don't really want to be a speed king... I was just in Wyoming having to run 22 miles below the speed limit and at times felt like a bit of a road hazard. I may be taking comments from other drivers about the slow trucks too personally.

Swift is limited to 62 MPH. Trust me, if I get behind anyone going 61 MPH, I do my best to pass them - it takes about 2 minutes, but I get my 1 mph back!

Mark P.'s Comment
member avatar

I had seen what Prime tops their driver speeds at, and I was actually wondering how that played out on interstates that have 70mph or 75mph speed limits. Safety first, of course, but in some cases being that much slower can be a hazard itself. Do drivers ever run into any traffic enforcement issues with truck speed, or do police officers generally understand the speed cap?

I have never heard of any of the drivers being hassled for obstructing traffic or anything of that sort. I imagine that as long as they stay in the right lane and are above the posted minimum speed that there is no reason for Law Enforcement to bother them.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Miss Miyoshi wonders:

Do drivers ever run into any traffic enforcement issues with truck speed, or do police officers generally understand the speed cap?

That's why Interstates have at least two lanes. One for cruising (right lane) and one for passing turtles (left lane). Sometimes there's a minimum speed, say, 40mph. Your rig should easily do that on a flat run.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

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