Backing Up

Topic 11339 | Page 2

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A-Ro's Comment
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Appreciate the advice y'all

Second Chance's Comment
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My grandfather drove in the 60's, 70's, 80' 90' and retired in 2000. He said you will never master it, and you will always continue to learn to fix mistakes quicker then the previous time.

Also as someone else said, just drive in NJ. My second night out I had to do a 90 degree blindside twice. I was crapping bricks it was so tight. Thank God no one was watching, took a deep breath, and followed it in. Don't let the trailer drive you. Take control and make it do what you want it to do.

Like someone else said, it all about it clicking on your own timeing.

Follow the path of the tandems and the rear of the trailer at the same time. Get the bend, and follow it in. The key is setup. If you can't get your setup right, you will be there all day. Keep track of your setup as well, this way when you come to the conclusion it is a bad setup, you know where your started to make changes. I always pull a lane ahead go to 12 and turn to 9 and back it in. Well, there isn't always space for that. What I found was let say you only have the room to go to 10 or 11 instead of 12, you then need to pull forward more on your 9 to have the room to bend it in. If you don't give yourself space to turn the truck, for instance a 45 back driverside: make sure you have wiggle room on your passenger side otherwise you will never get it in.

When I did the 90 blind side. I had no room. I was basically scraping the wall on my driverside of the tractor. The only way I was able to get it in was to pull far enough forward to allow it to drop in with out doing a whole lot of steering, and timing it so that by the time the trailer slides in the hole, your at the point where there is space enough to straighten out. Hopefully you deciphered that😁

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

Michael R.'s Comment
member avatar

Omg Minnie me lol. I take it your talking about an angle back between two trailers or trucks. First of all breathe 2nd screw everybody else you got to not worry about that that puts to much pressure on you. Ok so maybe this will help you two things a vet showed me and it works.first when angle backing between two trailers or trucks you got to get the picture and what I mean is take your driver side tandems and keep them on the line on the drivers idea if there is one or closest to the trailor on the driver side hence creating the pic if I'm that close on drivers idea I'm good on the otherside. 2nd get some flashlight or something lay them down and keep close to them. Hope this helps it did me because what you explained was exactly me. Laughing at yourself is a great thing because if anyone was going to criticize you it shuts them up. I did my first blind side back yesterday at 3 am after driving 11hrs I was tired it was dark concrete walls all around very tight quarters and docks were at angle and trucks all around point is omg I did it but took me 50 minstrel lol but I learned so much.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

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