Roehl Transport's New Training Contract Is It Fair?

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Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

(I'm only speaking from my experience - Swift's company school then Swift driving, and what I've read her at TT.)

It's too bad it's not easy for a prospective student to learn more about the trucking lifestyle before they even set foot in a school. The trucking companies will accept almost any warm body with a DOT physical and a CDL permit. But most of those warm bodies have little idea what they're getting into, both the financial commitment and the physical requirements.

If you get a job in a warehouse, for example, and decide the pressure to get things moved and packed is too much, you can pretty much just walk away. But if you realize for your self that trucking is just too much, you may be already on the hook for several thousand dollars, and no way out of that.

At the Swift school, the first three days are no charge, and if you decide it's not for you you can walk out and they will get you a bus ticket home, all no charge. But even that doesn't give you the real idea of the truckers lifestyle.

All very true. That was the #1 reason I wrote my book (free to read online!) and started this website was to help people understand what they're getting themselves into before they make the commitment.

What I've pondered is creating a "Life On The Road" section in the High Road Training Program where people can learn about the demands, risks, pressures, sacrifices, and expectations for drivers in this industry. My thinking was that a company or a school could require someone to do that section before showing up on day one. That way you know the person has at least been warned and their expectations of what lies ahead in training and life on the road should at least be reasonable.

People often go in with such skewed expectations that within hours or days of beginning their training they're ready to walk away. And many do! If this industry could do more to educate people about the demands of the job before they got started it would save a lot of grief.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Robert B. (The Dragon) ye's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

(I'm only speaking from my experience - Swift's company school then Swift driving, and what I've read her at TT.)

It's too bad it's not easy for a prospective student to learn more about the trucking lifestyle before they even set foot in a school. The trucking companies will accept almost any warm body with a DOT physical and a CDL permit. But most of those warm bodies have little idea what they're getting into, both the financial commitment and the physical requirements.

If you get a job in a warehouse, for example, and decide the pressure to get things moved and packed is too much, you can pretty much just walk away. But if you realize for your self that trucking is just too much, you may be already on the hook for several thousand dollars, and no way out of that.

At the Swift school, the first three days are no charge, and if you decide it's not for you you can walk out and they will get you a bus ticket home, all no charge. But even that doesn't give you the real idea of the truckers lifestyle.

double-quotes-end.png

All very true. That was the #1 reason I wrote my book (free to read online!) and started this website was to help people understand what they're getting themselves into before they make the commitment.

What I've pondered is creating a "Life On The Road" section in the High Road Training Program where people can learn about the demands, risks, pressures, sacrifices, and expectations for drivers in this industry. My thinking was that a company or a school could require someone to do that section before showing up on day one. That way you know the person has at least been warned and their expectations of what lies ahead in training and life on the road should at least be reasonable.

People often go in with such skewed expectations that within hours or days of beginning their training they're ready to walk away. And many do! If this industry could do more to educate people about the demands of the job before they got started it would save a lot of grief.

So, so true. Everyone thinks, I'll get my cdl and money will rain from the heavens and this and that. It truly is a lifestyle, even for the drivers who run local. Every day brings a different challenge and you either overcome it or it'll run you over. In regards to Ruminators objection to the Roehl training and cost, go somewhere else.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
Everyone thinks, I'll get my cdl and money will rain from the heavens and this and that.

They also hear, "Truck drivers are in huge demand!" and that sends some people strollin right on in the place thinkin they're a rock star.

They're wearin their shades at night, they have an entourage carrying their bags, they chose to fly instead of take the bus, and they're like "Thank you. Thank you. Here's my list of demands. Here's everything I can already see you're doing wrong as a company. Here's what I expect from the people I encounter. Here's the minimum specs for any truck I'll consider driving. Here's the minimum requirements for any trainers I'll be considering for the position."

....and they don't realize that no one thinks anything of rookies in the beginning because no one is assured of success or longevity in this industry. Unless you've lived it you haven't done anything and you don't know anything in the eyes of the people who have. You might not last a week, and even then you may hit a bridge or go bonkers from isolation and burnout. Nobody knows. They're just going to grab a bag of popcorn, sit back, and wait to see what happens.

I can't stress this enough.....be humble, especially in the beginning. You don't know how difficult this job or lifestyle is until you've lived it. Just trust us when we tell you that. We're saying it for your own good. If you want things to go smoothly you need to get along well with people, listen and learn, be tolerant, and be humble.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
The Persian Conversion's Comment
member avatar
They're wearin their shades at night, they have an entourage carrying their bags, they chose to fly instead of take the bus, and they're like "Thank you. Thank you. Here's my list of demands. Here's everything I can already see you're doing wrong as a company. Here's what I expect from the people I encounter. Here's the minimum specs for any truck I'll consider driving. Here's the minimum requirements for any trainers I'll be considering for the position."

Awesome imagery. I can totally see it: Kim Kardashian arriving at CDL school...

rofl-1.gif

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
RebelliousVamp 's Comment
member avatar

There is *absolutely* nothing wrong with no wanting a smoker or someone who is a slob as a trainer. Those are MY minimum requirements and I'm not being prissy because of that. It's putting my health first. I'm allergic to cigarette smoke and will have strong nausea and eventually throw up if not taken away from a smoker fast enough. we're not children anymore, we're all adults and it's ok to know what we're willing to put up with, and what we're not. Simple as that. Being humble to me is knowing that regarding driving a truck (the skills it takes), I know NOTHING of it indeed. I do need to be humble on that aspect and pay attention to those who have the knowledge. This is why I'm going to training. To learn how to operate a truck, safely and efficiently. Regarding the rest...hygiene, how I should eat (it's well known that a vast majority of truckers eat truck stop food and are overweight as a result), how to manage my personal space, etc. I think I can manage very well with that. I know a thing or two and I'm not exactly stupid, even tho it seems that some people have all the best answers, know everything and I'm always wrong. It's getting quite frustrating to be told over and over "you know nothing, you're just a newb". Frankly, I feel like seeing myself going back to where I came from, because almost *anything* I talk about or voice an opinion on, I always get criticized on and I guess I have nothing "intelligent" to contribute for all who have apparently all the correct answers. I hope not to read that I'm "just a newb" again today. I am well aware that I am new to trucking. I am not new at LIFE, however. And I certainly do not consider myself as a super star. Quite the opposite. I matter very little in this big world.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Miss Miyoshi's Comment
member avatar

They also hear, "Truck drivers are in huge demand!" and that sends some people strollin right on in the place thinkin they're a rock star.

I don't know about the rest of you guys, but I'm TOTALLY a rockstar. m0827.gif

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

RebelliousVamp stands up and says,

We're not children anymore, we're all adults and it's ok to know what we're willing to put up with, and what we're not. Simple as that.

Hit the nail on the head, and sets it with one stroke!

RV, I've read many of your posts here. You are one of the few that hides nothing: your eagerness, your disappointments, what you want out of this business.

I can't say I'm "amazed", because that means I had lower expectations for you. But I am stoked for you because you do not give up. Pick up, dust off, and get back at it. You're setting an example for those who come later.

Keep Movin'!

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

RV, I've never seen anyone so easily offended. That's not going to serve you well at all out there. If you can't stand to hear that you're a newbie when you are from someone who wants to see you be successful and is trying to help, how are you going to handle yourself out there when on a daily basis you're hearing cavemen throw disgusting filth your way just to see how vile they can be? Because trust me, it's going to happen quite regularly.

And to be honest I wasn't even thinking of you at all when I was saying that stuff. But now that you've decided to be offended, you do happen to have an extraordinarily long list of wants and needs compared with your typical truck driver so I guess that's why you thought I was referring to you and why you're so easily offended about it.

Geez, and Miss Miyoshi halfheartedly said that maybe we should allow some swearing in here? I can't even call a newbie a newbie without getting blasted for it.

Well RV I don't mean to offend you so often. I try to be perfectly honest about what you guys are going to deal with out there and obviously it isn't always want people want to hear. That seems especially true for you. But that's why the site is called TruckingTruth. We try to be nice about everything but honest at the same time and that's a tough line to toe sometimes. But hey, If we only wanted to sell the smooth and creamy side of trucking we'd be callin it TruckingButter.

RebelliousVamp 's Comment
member avatar

I want this. Failure is not an option. I'm walking into this thinking it will be worse than anything I've imagined, so if it's actually easier than I thought, I'll be happy and relieved. I do speak my mind, I know I don't always have the best "filters" but at least, you know what you're getting into with me. I'm genuine, not a hypocrite. What you see is what you get. I just always hope I don't hurt people's feelings along the way, because it's never intentional. (Unless you're a mean person to me, then I might show you my horns)

RebelliousVamp 's Comment
member avatar

What's wrong with truckingbutter. Sounds good.

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