Boots And Gloves Recommendation

Topic 12675 | Page 1

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sgtwilldog's Comment
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What brands do current drivers recommend for boots and gloves? I heard some gloves advertised on roaddog radio but I forget what they are called. Anyone know about these? Thanks!

Errol V.'s Comment
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I don't really go for a particular brand. If you are looking for brands, go all the way: Carhart gloves & jacket, Red Wing boots.

If you want to use your first paycheck for more than a pair of gloves and some boots, just get a pair of leather palmed gloves. I wore mine out after about 6 months. Then another pair of $7 gloves which are still doing great.

For your tootsies, a pair of ankle high hiking or work boots will do you just fine. Some people talk up steel toe, buy in my first year, I never saw a requirement for them.

Susan D. 's Comment
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Many companies don't require steel toe (or composite either) but if they do, they'll generally give them to you or reimburse some or all of the cost. What companies DON'T want to see at the terminal or in training are: slip ons, open toed, athletic shoes, etc. Most want to see you in sturdy leather boots with low heeled rubber bottoms.

in late November, I ordered an awesome pair of retro Dingo harness boots. They look great with my jeans if I say so myself,. They're super comfortable and I can walk in them all day on concrete floors with no trouble.

I got a great pair of hybrid poly/spandex leather palmed work gloves with leather reinforced palms (double leather across palms) (Midwest Quality Gloves) the other day from Walmart. I think they were about $12. They look similar to bull riding gloves. I already had a black carhartt work jacket that i don't mind getting dirty for pretripping and fueling.

Next I need an updated atlas, a heavy duty mag style flashlight, and a few other basic odds and ends, but I'm ready.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Rob S.'s Comment
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Mechanics gloves that can be washed with my laundry. Ordinary new balance walking shoes.

SouthernJourneyman's Comment
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My advice is to wait till you find out what the requirements are for the company you are going to end up working for. Some you may get away with tennis shoes and cloth gloves. Others not. The company I drive for is strictly flatbed and we haul a lot of steel. When in steel mills and many other shippers we have to wear steel toe leather boots and leather gloves. I really like my Redwing Irish Setter boots. And I get the split leather gloves at Tractor Supply. Cost more than the ones my company sells but they last a lot longer. Keep in mind, you can wear whatever when driving.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

DWI:

Driving While Intoxicated

Susan D. 's Comment
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WST sent me a list of exactly what to bring and I'm sure most companies do that too.

Errol V.'s Comment
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WST sent me a list of exactly what to bring and I'm sure most companies do that too.

To be sure! But one reason I put so much detail in many answers is fit the benefit of other readers still trying to figure out Trucking.

I suggest leather palm (you don't need those big grey leather work gloves) is some landing gear crank handles would work as meat grinders - so protect your hands.

For boots, since you'll be hopping in and out of the truck, ankle high boots for foot & ankle support. Steel toes: in the year I've been driving for Swift, all drop/hook, no-touch, I've never been in a situation that would use steel toe. If you first bed with steel, or drive car carrier, maybe.

I have a pair of steel toe boots, but they are for motorcycle riding.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
G-Town's Comment
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I swear by Caterpillar boots. They have many styles, many are waterproof, with and without steel toe. They wear extremely well, comfortable, and I have never had an issue with fit. I purchase them through Amazon. For gloves I've had very good results with gloves sold by Harbor Freight. I use three types of gloves; basic leather palm work glove, a rubber faced glove for fueling and a heavy duty winter weight work glove for outdoor work in the yard and on docks (drop and hook, spotting trailers, etc.).

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

C. S.'s Comment
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I swear by Caterpillar boots. They have many styles, many are waterproof, with and without steel toe. They wear extremely well, comfortable, and I have never had an issue with fit.

I second this. I wear Cat work shoes that are nonslip and steel toed; they look like a regular pair of sneakers and are very comfortable. They have lasted over a year and a half now, are starting to get slightly worn but they're the only shoes I wear and I tend to abuse my shoes (pulling on/off without untying).

The Persian Conversion's Comment
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I chose to go with the Original Muck Boot Company, Wetland series. I did the steel toe because I drive flatbed and there are some places where they are required. They're totally waterproof even when splashing in puddles (yes, I still do that), and they have great traction and ankle protection. All-around a great product.

And yeah, Carhartt gloves are top-notch as well.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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