Schneider, Roehle, And Werner

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Hawkeye's Comment
member avatar

Afternoon Everyone,

I've been looking at this website for months and enjoy the frank discussions and great advice.

I am 57 years old and looking forward to my driving career. After 20 years in the military and a couple of jobs in the private sector, I decided it was time for me to do something I've always wanted to do and drive a truck. This website has provided me with great information about trucking and I want to thank Brett for hosting the site.

After reading all the information about truck driving schools and reading the trucker's forum, I decided to attend a private driving school. While the company sponsored training is tempting, I decided I wanted more of an independent approach to learning how to drive. After researching several schools in my area, I decided to attend Shippers Choice. I start on the 8th of February and will try and keep you updated on my progress.

Now I do have a couple of questions. I've narrowed my choice of companies I'd like to drive for down to three. Schneider, Werner and Roehl. Now if you read the mostly negative comments about trucking companies from drivers, whether on this site or others, you would never get into the business. However, I agree with Brett, most of these drivers just have an axe to grind and these comments are not typical of the vast majority of those who drive on a daily basis.

Now my questions:

I've read a few comments from drivers who work for Schneider and Roehl about the company telling drivers which route to take. Is this a standard practice? To me, part of the appeal about driving is being able to plan your own route. Also, I would rather stay on the major freeways as apposed to taking an 80,000 pound truck on some side roads.

Now each of the companies I've researched have great attributes. From what I can tell Schneider has a great training program, Werner seems to have good equipment and Roehl has a great home policy.

My second question is about the home policy which is the most important attribute to me. While a regional route is something I want, I wouldn't mind being on the road for a couple of weeks as long as I could have at least three days off in-between jobs. Roehl's website says it offers this type of program. However, I'd like to hear from Roehl drivers on how the program is working for them.

Although home time is an important consideration, I'm leaning towards Schneider because of all the possitive comments I've read about their training program. Now, if they offered three days off in between jobs, I would work for them. Anyone know if Schneider offers this time of home time program?

Again, thank you Brett for hosting this site, I've found it very informative and an invaluable tool in helping me get my CDL learners permit.

Regards,

Bill Centreville, Virginina

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Company Sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

William P wrote:

I've read a few comments from drivers who work for Schneider and Roehl about the company telling drivers which route to take. Is this a standard practice? To me, part of the appeal about driving is being able to plan your own route. Also, I would rather stay on the major freeways as apposed to taking an 80,000 pound truck on some side roads.

Welcome Bill! Thanks for crossing over from lurking to posting.

Most of the large carriers electronically dispatch which includes a pre-selected route plan that is then updated automatically into the GPS navigation system (ex: "NaviGo" which in my case is integrated within the "Qualcom" system). Although it's advisable for a driver to check the selected route plan using a trucker's atlas (Rand McNally) ensuring the route is truck friendly, most of the actual planning is done for us. It's best to follow the route that was selected. Unless necessary (due to road closures, traffic or weather), going too far out-of-route is not a good idea and will likely prompt a discussion with a driver manager. The trick for us is to plan where to shut-down for the 10 hour break so the 11 hours of legal drive time is maximized.

Good luck with school.

Driver Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Nate_K's Comment
member avatar

Roehl tells you the route to take and where to get fuel. Now I have veered off their route a few times and have never heard a word from them about it. Roehl also will run you most direct route. I seem to get a good variety of freeway and highway routes.

As far as hometime Roehl has some good options. I run the 7/4, 7/3 which I like. I can plan things months in advance because I know when I will be home. They also offer a 14/7 that I will switch to in the future. The downside to these options is you share the truck.

As far as equipment goes Roehl has great equipment. I think 2014's are being phased out because I only see 2015-16's and all our trailers (reefer is what I pull) are in great condition. We actually just bought a bunch of new ones and heard more will be purchased soon.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Hawkeye's Comment
member avatar

Thanks Nate for the comments.

Question, do you have to live near a drop yard to make the hometime work?

I live in Centreville, Virginia which is outside of Washington, DC. How do I meet up with the truck?

Bill

Roehl tells you the route to take and where to get fuel. Now I have veered off their route a few times and have never heard a word from them about it. Roehl also will run you most direct route. I seem to get a good variety of freeway and highway routes.

As far as hometime Roehl has some good options. I run the 7/4, 7/3 which I like. I can plan things months in advance because I know when I will be home. They also offer a 14/7 that I will switch to in the future. The downside to these options is you share the truck.

As far as equipment goes Roehl has great equipment. I think 2014's are being phased out because I only see 2015-16's and all our trailers (reefer is what I pull) are in great condition. We actually just bought a bunch of new ones and heard more will be purchased soon.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

RebelliousVamp 's Comment
member avatar

Roehls home time + is not offered everywhere. I already called and asked, I'm in New England. All they offered was a week out, one day at home. Same as with any other company. :(

Hawkeye's Comment
member avatar

That's what I was afraid of.

Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

Roehls hometime options really depends on where you live. I guess I would be considered lucky if I chose to work for them because in my area, all their options are available. Call a recruiter and see what's available in your area.

A regional job would very likely have you home weekends, but that's most likely for 34-48 hours for your reset. Most OTR jobs you esrn 1 day off for every 7 days out, so if you had to have 3 days off you'd likely be required to stay out 3 weeks at a time.

Additionally, home daily jobs are not unheard of for new drivers. Just realize that many of these are store delivery accounts, fuel tanker delivery, with having to get in really tight places and deal with heavy traffic, while doing your own unloading. It's very hard work and difficult for brand new drivers. . Not impossible, but difficult.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Hawkeye's Comment
member avatar

Thanks for the advice Sue!

Bill

Steve L.'s Comment
member avatar

Afternoon Everyone,

I've been looking at this website for months and enjoy the frank discussions and great advice.

I am 57 years old and looking forward to my driving career. After 20 years in the military and a couple of jobs in the private sector, I decided it was time for me to do something I've always wanted to do and drive a truck. This website has provided me with great information about trucking and I want to thank Brett for hosting the site.

After reading all the information about truck driving schools and reading the trucker's forum, I decided to attend a private driving school. While the company sponsored training is tempting, I decided I wanted more of an independent approach to learning how to drive. After researching several schools in my area, I decided to attend Shippers Choice. I start on the 8th of February and will try and keep you updated on my progress.

Now I do have a couple of questions. I've narrowed my choice of companies I'd like to drive for down to three. Schneider, Werner and Roehl. Now if you read the mostly negative comments about trucking companies from drivers, whether on this site or others, you would never get into the business. However, I agree with Brett, most of these drivers just have an axe to grind and these comments are not typical of the vast majority of those who drive on a daily basis.

Now my questions:

I've read a few comments from drivers who work for Schneider and Roehl about the company telling drivers which route to take. Is this a standard practice? To me, part of the appeal about driving is being able to plan your own route. Also, I would rather stay on the major freeways as apposed to taking an 80,000 pound truck on some side roads.

Now each of the companies I've researched have great attributes. From what I can tell Schneider has a great training program, Werner seems to have good equipment and Roehl has a great home policy.

My second question is about the home policy which is the most important attribute to me. While a regional route is something I want, I wouldn't mind being on the road for a couple of weeks as long as I could have at least three days off in-between jobs. Roehl's website says it offers this type of program. However, I'd like to hear from Roehl drivers on how the program is working for them.

Although home time is an important consideration, I'm leaning towards Schneider because of all the possitive comments I've read about their training program. Now, if they offered three days off in between jobs, I would work for them. Anyone know if Schneider offers this time of home time program?

Again, thank you Brett for hosting this site, I've found it very informative and an invaluable tool in helping me get my CDL learners permit.

Regards,

Bill Centreville, Virginina

Welcome! I started driving for Schneider just over a year ago @ age 53. Military & private sector experience as well. Thanks for your service.

1. Schneider routes you like many others, but it's on approved truck routes and mostly interstate or US highways (which I often prefer because of less traffic and many are four lane highways). However, I will sometimes take an alternate route if it makes sense. E.g. NaviGo often routes me on US 20 east across Indiana. I take the Indiana toll road which is quicker, same path and company pays the toll (EzPass).

2. Home time varies with your position. I'm OTR and go home 2 times a month. Once for two days, once for three days. With Schneider, if you're regional, you'll get home each week, but might get home Saturday and back out Monday. Also, Schneider has many dedicated accounts. One I recently worked for a long weekend was for Target out of Stuart's Draft, VA. It was all drop/hook to stores in Baltimore, DC, MD, DE & NJ area. Some of the drivers I spoke with really like it 'cause if they live near there, they get home more. The schedule is consistent and the money is good.

Schneider is a great company and they've kept every promise the recruiter made.

You can private message me if you want more Schneider info and I'll give you my phone number.

Good luck and thanks again for your service.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

Company Sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Hrynn's Comment
member avatar

Yousaid thatta you were okay working for a couple of weeks if you got at least 3 days at home, right? The regular roehl hometime policy is 11-14 days out earns you 3 days at home. Now they also have the hometime fleets, but as RV said, that might not be available in your area. You have to live within a certain distance of a dropyard. RV was told they don't do hometime fleets out of the yard nearest her, I'm not sure why, so you will have to call and ask what/if they have available extended hometime options.

(RV, did they say why? The only theory I can come up with is that is not a secure yard so maybe they aren't comfortable leaving trucks there unattended for a week at a time. Most yards have a locked gate that you need your company id/gate pass to get in, but if I remember correctyly Springfield was just open. Darlington is also open though and I think they do hometime out of there....no idea).

Schneider I've heard also offeres extended hometime options, but they don't advertise it as much as Roehl so it may be a little more limited in availability. You will most likely still need to live near a Schneider facility and as with Roehl you will just have to call them to see what is available. I don't know much about Werner's hometime policies.

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