Looking At Central Or Roehl...also A Medication Question, Thank You

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G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Mr bean says "Nope!":

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I made this post without looking up Central. When I did and found it listed under Swift, I thought "Nope!" because I've "heard" things about Swift on here,

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Errol replied to Mr. Bean

So you "heard"/read things here about Swift that make you say No?

Just curious, what's wrong with Swift? TT/Swift drivers want to know.

Ditto for me Mr. Bean... What did you "hear" and where is "on here"?

firemedic2816's Comment
member avatar

The Internet is FULL of USEFUL accurate information (if it's online it HAS to be true LOL) I don't know much about Swift except for they are one of THE LARGEST carriers in the United States and you don't get that way by being a BAD Company. If you want to know about a COMPANY Call THEM or ask drivers on here....When I was researching for a company to go to, I went to the local truck stops (there are about 8 with in 10 miles of my house) I simply researched them online, and when I found one I liked I headed to the truck stops. I would see them in the Restaurants and politely tell them my intentions and ask if I could pick their brain about their company for a moment. The ones that agreed to let me pick their brains, ended up getting the tab picked up by me. I learned a lot about different companies BY ASKING DRIVERS....Recruiters are there to get Tails in the driver seat, (many are honest, other's are just trying to make a dollar)

Don't trust EVERYTHING you read ON LINE....Put some miles on them shoes and ASK PEOPLE

I'm getting down to it. Well, almost. The bug has bitten me and I'm about ready to start applying, and I've narrowed the list down to either Roehl or Central. I'm looking for something with zero payment down, which I know is hard to find, but it's all I can afford right now. Only question is - I'm on medication (Prozak)...Will that blow my chances at becoming a driver?

I know Roehl requires you to take the CDL exam before applying, I've been through their site, watched the videos, yadda yadda.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
worrywort's Comment
member avatar

Guys - I'm very sorry. I wasn't thinking, and y'all are right - Swift came up on some truck review site on Google. I've got a headache and I'm smh for bad mouthing. And, thank you for not throwing me to the wolves. (I'm trying my best not to come across as sarcastic, it's my attitude, I think.)

Well...I'm not sure who I'll go with training-wise - but - my application was approved on Monday to start for Prime in Jefferson, Missouri. A few of my friends and family, (okay, just one friend and two family members), are advising me against traveling all the way to Missouri. I'm trying hard not to listen to them. I would miss them tremendously, and the recruiter asked me if I and my family are prepared for me leaving, to which I said yes, which was kind of a lie. Ugh...

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Bean, you are forgiven. Swift is a great company, and could be the second choice if Prime doesn't with out.

"Friends" are advising me against traveling all the way to Missouri. I'm trying hard not to listen to them. I would miss them tremendously, and the recruiter asked me if I and my family are prepared for me leaving, to which I said yes, which was kind of a lie

Missouri is OK. I spent a week there once last year. No problems!

No matter where you go for school, plan to be gone for several months. You get school (4 weeks), then road training (4+ weeks) and then, hopefully, your own truck. Now Prime may let you get home in between those sections, so ask your recruiter about that.

Of course, if you're going OTR you will be driving as long as two weeks to a month between home visits.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
worrywort's Comment
member avatar

Thanks Errol V.

Where is Swifts training hq? I suspect it's Utah since Central was based there.

Oh yeah, Prime won't let me take my own vehicle to travel to Missouri, I have to ride the Greyhound. D'oh! The recruiter told me that there aren't enough parking spaces at the hotel and hq to be able to park my own vehicle. If I go with Prime, does anyone know if theres parking somewhere nearby and then just be able to walk to the hotel/hq?

Seriously considering Swift right now, though.

Does Swift allow travel to their training hq in your own car? Does Swift put you in a hotel? Also, how long before my first paycheck?

My fam just needs to suck it up...

Bean, you are forgiven. Swift is a great company, and could be the second choice if Prime doesn't with out.

double-quotes-start.png

"Friends" are advising me against traveling all the way to Missouri. I'm trying hard not to listen to them. I would miss them tremendously, and the recruiter asked me if I and my family are prepared for me leaving, to which I said yes, which was kind of a lie

double-quotes-end.png

Missouri if OK. I spent a week there once last year. No problems!

No matter where you go for school, plan to be gone for several months. You get school (4 weeks), then road training (4+ weeks) and then, hopefully, your own truck. Now Prime may let you get home in between those sections, so ask your recruiter about that.

Of course, if you're going OTR you will be driving as long as two weeks to a month between home visits.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Bean, I think you're overly focused on the training phase. When it comes to choosing a company, go with one that has the type of freight you'd like to haul and the home time options you're looking for. Those are the big two. Don't worry about how long the training is or where the hotel is or any of that stuff. Doesn't matter. Here's some great information to help you decide if you haven't seen it already:

My fam just needs to suck it up...

We highly recommend you make sure your family is on board with this. Getting your career started in trucking is super stressful as it is. Doing it without the support of your family will make it ten times more difficult. They may not be happy about it but are they willing to support you during the tough times until you can find a way to be home more often? That's an important question.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Bean wrote:

Seriously considering Swift right now, though. Does Swift allow travel to their training hq in your own car? Does Swift put you in a hotel? Also, how long before my first paycheck?

Bean,...I do agree with Brett. Training is important, however in the grand scheme of things only one piece of the decision making process. For example; my final decision to go with Swift came down to a discussion with one of their experienced mentors (running as a Northeast Regional Dedicated Driver) who was referred to me by a mutual friend. Up to that point I had a three way tie. In hindsight I definitely made the right decision, still with Swift 4 years later.

The answer to your questions:

1- YES, Swift does allow you to drive to their training facilities and will reimburse for your mileage. They don't have a single training HQ, they have numerous training locations.

2- YES, Swift will put you up in a hotel, sharing a room with up to two other students. This is part of the tuition costs.

3- You receive your first paycheck approximately 1.5 weeks after orientation which occurs after you graduate and pass the CDL tests. At that point you are on the payroll as a driver trainee.

Many of your questions and possibly future questions could be addressed if you review their website: Swift Transportation

Good luck.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Swifttrans:

Swift Transportation began operations in 1966 transporting imported steel through the ports of Los Angeles to Arizona and Arizona cotton for export back through to Southern California.

Jerry Moyes, founder, began with the same entrepreneurial, can-do spirit that is one of Swift’s core values today.

Today, Swift generates over $4 billion in revenue and operates nearly 18,000 trucks.

worrywort's Comment
member avatar

Thank you G-Town and Brett, good info!

The family I'm talking about is *mainly* my dad, who is pessimistic about me getting into trucking, since I'm on "crazy" (my term) pills (he is sure that I won't be able to get a job, and that it would be hard to schedule appointments for getting prescriptions, etc.). Other than that, he's okay with it - he doesn't like the idea of me traveling to Missouri, though, but jesus h. christmas, I'm 34.

Anyway, I'm studying like a madman here on truckingtruth.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
worrywort's Comment
member avatar

Thank you also firemedic2816. I've noticed that, too, about things on the internet...it must be the name of the game!

The Internet is FULL of USEFUL accurate information (if it's online it HAS to be true LOL) I don't know much about Swift except for they are one of THE LARGEST carriers in the United States and you don't get that way by being a BAD Company. If you want to know about a COMPANY Call THEM or ask drivers on here....When I was researching for a company to go to, I went to the local truck stops (there are about 8 with in 10 miles of my house) I simply researched them online, and when I found one I liked I headed to the truck stops. I would see them in the Restaurants and politely tell them my intentions and ask if I could pick their brain about their company for a moment. The ones that agreed to let me pick their brains, ended up getting the tab picked up by me. I learned a lot about different companies BY ASKING DRIVERS....Recruiters are there to get Tails in the driver seat, (many are honest, other's are just trying to make a dollar)

Don't trust EVERYTHING you read ON LINE....Put some miles on them shoes and ASK PEOPLE

double-quotes-start.png

I'm getting down to it. Well, almost. The bug has bitten me and I'm about ready to start applying, and I've narrowed the list down to either Roehl or Central. I'm looking for something with zero payment down, which I know is hard to find, but it's all I can afford right now. Only question is - I'm on medication (Prozak)...Will that blow my chances at becoming a driver?

I know Roehl requires you to take the CDL exam before applying, I've been through their site, watched the videos, yadda yadda.

double-quotes-end.png

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Thank you G-Town and Brett, good info!

The family I'm talking about is *mainly* my dad, who is pessimistic about me getting into trucking, since I'm on "crazy" (my term) pills (he is sure that I won't be able to get a job, and that it would be hard to schedule appointments for getting prescriptions, etc.). Other than that, he's okay with it - he doesn't like the idea of me traveling to Missouri, though, but jesus h. christmas, I'm 34.

Anyway, I'm studying like a madman here on truckingtruth.

Bean considering the above statement, you should probably check this link to the FMCSA website specifying prohibited medications: Medications that disqualify a CMV driver. Once you are in there you can hunt around for the information you need. I would clue your Doctor in on what you are considering and take any of the FMCSA documentation you download with you.

Good luck.

CSA:

Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA)

The CSA is a Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) initiative to improve large truck and bus safety and ultimately reduce crashes, injuries, and fatalities that are related to commercial motor vehicle

FMCSA:

Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration

The FMCSA was established within the Department of Transportation on January 1, 2000. Their primary mission is to prevent commercial motor vehicle-related fatalities and injuries.

What Does The FMCSA Do?

  • Commercial Drivers' Licenses
  • Data and Analysis
  • Regulatory Compliance and Enforcement
  • Research and Technology
  • Safety Assistance
  • Support and Information Sharing

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

CMV:

Commercial Motor Vehicle

A CMV is a vehicle that is used as part of a business, is involved in interstate commerce, and may fit any of these descriptions:

  • Weighs 10,001 pounds or more
  • Has a gross vehicle weight rating or gross combination weight rating of 10,001 pounds or more
  • Is designed or used to transport 16 or more passengers (including the driver) not for compensation
  • Is designed or used to transport 9 or more passengers (including the driver) for compensation
  • Is transporting hazardous materials in a quantity requiring placards

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
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