Looking To Switch Companies

Topic 15270 | Page 1

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Chelsea P.'s Comment
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I'm currently with Celadon, running under contract for them so I don't have to pay them back out of pocket for the training. However, they only pay 27 cents a mile during this timeframe; once I finish it, they bump me up to 33 cents a mile as a company driver. From what I've heard from other drivers, that's like pennies basically. So, I'm looking to change companies after I finish my contract, which should take about a year. The things I'm looking for are better pay, mostly drop and hook , no touch freight and a terminal in Gwinnett County, GA because I live there. A governor higher than 65 would also be great. I've heard that Averitt and US Express are good and I know that Averitt has a terminal that's like 10 minutes from my house. Any suggestions?

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

James J.'s Comment
member avatar

I drive for Averitt, they are a good company and start out at .39c a mile. check them out....

Gladhand's Comment
member avatar

Before you get ahead of yourself. Focus on finishing the contract. For all you know after a year, you may want to go local, or may not like it at all, or celadon may be the perfect fit.

I find myself doing the same thing some days, but if you are a good driver it doesn't matter who you work for. Be safe and keep it between the lines!

Last Shadow's Comment
member avatar

Shaffer or Crete will start you off at .45 CPM , they have a terminal in Marietta, if you go Shaffer which is reefer , and freight slows down you pull dry box, it's all no touch freight,.... Check it out....out

I'm currently with Celadon, running under contract for them so I don't have to pay them back out of pocket for the training. However, they only pay 27 cents a mile during this timeframe; once I finish it, they bump me up to 33 cents a mile as a company driver. From what I've heard from other drivers, that's like pennies basically. So, I'm looking to change companies after I finish my contract, which should take about a year. The things I'm looking for are better pay, mostly drop and hook , no touch freight and a terminal in Gwinnett County, GA because I live there. A governor higher than 65 would also be great. I've heard that Averitt and US Express are good and I know that Averitt has a terminal that's like 10 minutes from my house. Any suggestions?

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

Sam the Wrestler's Comment
member avatar

Don't you get a bump every 30,000 miles? Also, I've learned here at tt, don't always go on what other drivers say, do your own math. Js.

Chelsea P.'s Comment
member avatar

In answer to the question about pay raises, it's 1cpm every 120k miles. I do plan finishing my contract before doing anything so I don't owe them anything. I've been doing my own research about this but I thought I would ask more experienced drivers for some suggestions. I'm having difficulty just getting consistent miles with Celadon and I've been with them for two and a half months. I'm barely breaching 1000 miles a week here for the most part. That's another reason why I was looking elsewhere. Please keep the suggestions coming!!

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Gladhand's Comment
member avatar

In answer to the question about pay raises, it's 1cpm every 120k miles. I do plan finishing my contract before doing anything so I don't owe them anything. I've been doing my own research about this but I thought I would ask more experienced drivers for some suggestions. I'm having difficulty just getting consistent miles with Celadon and I've been with them for two and a half months. I'm barely breaching 1000 miles a week here for the most part. That's another reason why I was looking elsewhere. Please keep the suggestions coming!!

Have you talked to dispatch? Idk if celadon allows you to talk to the planners, but at Swift if I don't like what they are offering me I will contact a planner and they will usually give me a nice load.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Chelsea P.'s Comment
member avatar

I'm a company driver. I can't even get them to pay for all the actual miles that I drive. I had one load that was 110 miles over what they said it would be and didn't pay me for it just because that's what my GPS said versus whatever system they used. So sadly...no, can't do that, not unless I switch to owner operator which I'm not doing. Thanks for the suggestion though.

Owner Operator:

An owner-operator is a driver who either owns or leases the truck they are driving. A self-employed driver.

Tman's Comment
member avatar

There are some big trucking companies whose drivers wish to be able to drive at 65 mph. My governor is set at 61. I heard recently that there is talk on the federal level about governing all big trucks at 65 mph.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
C. S.'s Comment
member avatar
I'm barely breaching 1000 miles a week here for the most part.

1k a week is so ridiculously low I almost have to assume it is something on your end. I team for Celadon and we consistently break 6k a week. I know a lot of solo drivers who have no problem averaging 2,500 - 3,000. Equipment is expensive, they don't want it sitting if it doesn't have to. Have you proven yourself in the last two and a half months? Do you accept every load quickly? Do you do what it takes to make it on time to customers, early if possible? Do you figure out problems on your own, or do you expect your DM to hold your hand through every minor issue? I just honestly find it hard to believe that you're sitting for what is effectively five days out of every week if you're doing everything right, especially since it's high freight season.

I can't even get them to pay for all the actual miles that I drive. I had one load that was 110 miles over what they said it would be and didn't pay me for it just because that's what my GPS said versus whatever system they used.

This is typical. Look up the difference between HHG miles, practical miles, and hub miles. Most large carriers pay HHG miles.

My only point is that some of your complaints are likely related to you learning the ropes or the industry in general, not Celadon. I'm with you on the pay, though--if you can make 12 cpm+ more elsewhere it might be worth it to make the switch (after you've completed your contract, of course). Personally I think Celadon is a very team oriented company, which is one of the reasons I work for them. With all that said, I agree with what Devan said above; who knows what the next year will hold? They gave teams a raise a few months ago, maybe they have plans to raise solo pay as well.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

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