Reefer Tips For Rookies

Topic 16411 | Page 2

Page 2 of 4 Previous Page Next Page Go To Page:
icecold24k's Comment
member avatar

Thank you so much for this wealth of information. I am currently in my PSD phase with a reefer driver and I was planning on going flatbed during TNT and be in the flatbed division but am kind of on the fence now about which division I want to do. This is so helpful.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

PSD:

Prime Student Driver

Prime Inc has a CDL training program and the first phase is referred to as PSD. You'll get your permit and then 10,000 miles of on the road instruction.

The following is from Prime's website:

Prime’s PSD begins with you obtaining your CDL permit. Then you’ll go on the road with a certified CDL instructor for no less than 75 hours of one-on-one behind the wheel training. After training, you’ll return to Prime’s corporate headquarters in Springfield, Missouri, for final CDL state testing and your CDL license.

Obtain CDL Permit / 4 Days

  • Enter program, study and test for Missouri CDL permit.
  • Start driving/training at Prime Training Center in Springfield, Missouri.
  • Work toward 40,000 training dispatched miles (minimum) with food allowance while without CDL (Food allowance is paid back with future earnings).

On-the-Road Instruction / 10,000 Miles

  • Train with experienced certified CDL instructor for 3-4 weeks in a real world environment.
  • Get 75 hours of behind-the-wheel time with one-on-one student/instructor ratio.
  • Earn 10,000 miles toward total 40,000 miles needed.

TNT:

Trainer-N-Trainee

Prime Inc has their own CDL training program and it's divided into two phases - PSD and TNT.

The PSD (Prime Student Driver) phase is where you'll get your permit and then go on the road for 10,000 miles with a trainer. When you come back you'll get your CDL license and enter the TNT phase.

The TNT phase is the second phase of training where you'll go on the road with an experienced driver for 30,000 miles of team driving. You'll receive 14¢ per mile ($700 per week guaranteed) during this phase. Once you're finished with TNT training you will be assigned a truck to run solo.

Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

Here's another thread we got going with great info

tips for rookies

Fatsquatch 's Comment
member avatar

Here's a little visual tutorial of what I was talking about. Since Interstate only uses Thermo King reefers, I can't speak to the how-to for Carrier units, but this should give the newbies (or even veterans who've never delved into the menus before) an idea of what I meant.

So, from the default screen: flbamJd.jpg

Push the button that says "menu." You should see something that looks like this: 2lQiEsC.jpg

Push the button that says "gauges." A screen like this should pop up: w5eHcRu.jpg

Keep pushing the "next" button until you see this screen: RCbW5VI.jpg

Voila! A quick and easy way to see how much fuel is in your reefer no matter how scuzzy the gauge on the tank is. Unless the fuel level sensor itself is broke, in which case you're boned and the trailer should be taken to the shop anyway.

Again, this only specifically applies to Thermo King units, but I'm sure Carrier has a similar function built in somewhere.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Farmerbob1's Comment
member avatar

Thank You. Stevens runs exclusively Thermo King, so this will be useful for me the next time I run into a problem unit.

Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

Winter is upon us which means cold weather and dead batteries.

Be sure to us antigel in your reefer fuel tank, then fuel to mix it. If not the fuel will gel up and clog everything then shut down. You also need to put a quart in your tractor when fueling (depending on tank size, read labels).

We've been told never to use HOWES, it doesn't work.

When starting a reefer, be sure to let it run for a awhile before running the pretrip setting. The cold will give you an "electrical current fail" if not. If you get any failed test message dispatch or road assist.

Always remember dead batteries can be jumped by your truck or even jump your truck with the reefer...so have cables.

TA and Petro have reefer batteries but will not repair other issues. Know your manufacturer so you can find a dealer near you...AFTER you message your road assist people ;)

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Fatsquatch 's Comment
member avatar

Winter is upon us which means cold weather and dead batteries.

Be sure to us antigel in your reefer fuel tank, then fuel to mix it. If not the fuel will gel up and clog everything then shut down. You also need to put a quart in your tractor when fueling (depending on tank size, read labels).

We've been told never to use HOWES, it doesn't work.

When starting a reefer, be sure to let it run for a awhile before running the pretrip setting. The cold will give you an "electrical current fail" if not. If you get any failed test message dispatch or road assist.

Always remember dead batteries can be jumped by your truck or even jump your truck with the reefer...so have cables.

TA and Petro have reefer batteries but will not repair other issues. Know your manufacturer so you can find a dealer near you...AFTER you message your road assist people ;)

I don't know who's telling you not to use Howe's or why, but they're full of it. I've used Howe's numerous times over the years, in temps as low as -30°F, and never had any problems. It works fine.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Winter is upon us which means cold weather and dead batteries.

Be sure to us antigel in your reefer fuel tank, then fuel to mix it. If not the fuel will gel up and clog everything then shut down. You also need to put a quart in your tractor when fueling (depending on tank size, read labels).

We've been told never to use HOWES, it doesn't work.

When starting a reefer, be sure to let it run for a awhile before running the pretrip setting. The cold will give you an "electrical current fail" if not. If you get any failed test message dispatch or road assist.

Always remember dead batteries can be jumped by your truck or even jump your truck with the reefer...so have cables.

TA and Petro have reefer batteries but will not repair other issues. Know your manufacturer so you can find a dealer near you...AFTER you message your road assist people ;)

double-quotes-end.png

I don't know who's telling you not to use Howe's or why, but they're full of it. I've used Howe's numerous times over the years, in temps as low as -30°F, and never had any problems. It works fine.

Considering Rainy works for Prime...probably they are.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Reaper's Comment
member avatar

Thanks rainy much appreciated!!!

Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

Prime does tell us not to use it...but...one of my friends who is a trainer at Stevens and been driving for 20+ years used to use it until he got stuck in the cold in the middle of nowhere. He's a lease op who really takes care of his truck for the obvious reasons. The repair bill was staggering. The mechanic told him "its OK until you get in extreme temps". What extreme temps are who knows, but why risk it? Another Prime friend also was gelled and it wasn't fun. I felt bad for her cause she was so frustrated she called me crying and yelling.

But now I'm wondering if it has to do with the FL? Now that I'm thinking about it, all of the complaints I heard were in FL.

Fatsquatch what do you drive? Is there something in one make/model that would prevent it from working? Like a material in the hose lines or tanks or something? Also, all the trucks had APUs , so would Howes possibly clog the APUs or something but not affect the truck?

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

APU:

Auxiliary Power Unit

On tractor trailers, and APU is a small diesel engine that powers a heat and air conditioning unit while charging the truck's main batteries at the same time. This allows the driver to remain comfortable in the cab and have access to electric power without running the main truck engine.

Having an APU helps save money in fuel costs and saves wear and tear on the main engine, though they tend to be expensive to install and maintain. Therefore only a very small percentage of the trucks on the road today come equipped with an APU.

APUs:

Auxiliary Power Unit

On tractor trailers, and APU is a small diesel engine that powers a heat and air conditioning unit while charging the truck's main batteries at the same time. This allows the driver to remain comfortable in the cab and have access to electric power without running the main truck engine.

Having an APU helps save money in fuel costs and saves wear and tear on the main engine, though they tend to be expensive to install and maintain. Therefore only a very small percentage of the trucks on the road today come equipped with an APU.

Mr M's Comment
member avatar

Did you take home some of that meat. Would probably make some good carne asada burritos

Page 2 of 4 Previous Page Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

This topic has the following tags:

Hard Lessons Learned Refrigerated Tips for Parking
Click on any of the buttons above to view topics with that tag, or you can view a list of all forum tags here.

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More