A Single Question That's Literally For The Birds: Cab Bouncing. How Bad Is It?

Topic 17327 | Page 2

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Cwc's Comment
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How heavy or light your load will make a difference. Also if you have your load balanced. Lighter loads I can feel the trailer bounce, but not much effects up front. Hitting a hard bump with a heavy load tends to toss my truck around pretty good.

You can always tell when it's a good one.... All the doors for the cabinets are open.

Plot Twist!'s Comment
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I thought about bringing my Grey in the beginning but I just couldn't do it and he is "my bird" so he has alot more fits while I'm gone.

But he's a happy camper when I get home. He won't shut up for the first few hours "just to make sure he gets all my attention for awhile"

I also recommend checking out a Pack O Bird. Other companies might make them now but for the times you have to get out of your truck like at some shops while in for service it makes life a little easier and they collapse down to nothing.

Oh, that's a good carrier. I hadn't found that in my research for carrier cages without gaping gaps in them (finch bodies are like, the size of shooter marbles under all those feathers). Onto my list of things to get, it goes.

Parrots are all such babies, though I suspect my cats will be just as needy whenever I'm home. They like the roommate who will be taking care of them well enough, but I'm me. Pretty sure they'll be first on the list for attention whenever I get home, followed by my car getting all its fluids cycled around and its two whole axles (!) moved. Cars need to be ran once in a while or all kinds of stuff goes bad with them, and no one touches my machine child but me. :)

(I'm going to be such a nuisance for the mechanics if I'm not careful, just pelting them with questions... I may have already started learning the basics of diesels. But, I won't wrench on it if it's not mine unless it's something stupidly simple like clamping a hose back on or cleaning off an electrical ground that's getting grumpy.)

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Plot Twist!'s Comment
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How heavy or light your load will make a difference. Also if you have your load balanced. Lighter loads I can feel the trailer bounce, but not much effects up front. Hitting a hard bump with a heavy load tends to toss my truck around pretty good.

Hm, noted. I may need to come up with some way to cushion them extra-good regardless of the truck itself.

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How heavy or light your load will make a difference. Also if you have your load balanced. Lighter loads I can feel the trailer bounce, but not much effects up front. Hitting a hard bump with a heavy load tends to toss my truck around pretty good.

double-quotes-end.png

You can always tell when it's a good one.... All the doors for the cabinets are open.

Same with RVs. If it can swing, rattle, or open, it will.

Cwc's Comment
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Luckily my grey has another slave "my wife" and he tolerates her especially since while on my hometime I make up stuff for him to get daily like dried fruits and some but not many nuts and plastic and wood toys in coffee filters. And put them in an old pellet bucket to stay fresh and she puts them around his cage for him to find. But with her putting them into his cage I think that gives her cool points in his eyes.

Anyone reading this that doesn't have FIDS or Feathered kIDS, yes they can be just like kids... different moods, bribery is common, And you will have times that they will surprise you with just how smart they are. A dog can be kicked by it's owner and still seek affection from him. I have a Caique small 6-8 inchs tall.. And birds get pin feathers that hurt if touched the wrong way. This Caique will come up to be petted or scratched knowing she has pins that hurt and still rub her head against your hand and if it hurts her she'll bite the crap out of you for revenge. If you move your hand away from her she will chase it down and not stop till she gets her revenge. She won't naw on you forever but she will make it "even"

My Grey talks alot but occasionally gets bored and starts being loud to get our other two birds going then he'll be quiet for a few minutes and then tell the other two birds "cut it out your being to loud"

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Plot Twist!'s Comment
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Luckily my grey has another slave "my wife" and he tolerates her especially since while on my hometime I make up stuff for him to get daily like dried fruits and some but not many nuts and plastic and wood toys in coffee filters. And put them in an old pellet bucket to stay fresh and she puts them around his cage for him to find. But with her putting them into his cage I think that gives her cool points in his eyes.

Anyone reading this that doesn't have FIDS or Feathered kIDS, yes they can be just like kids... different moods, bribery is common, And you will have times that they will surprise you with just how smart they are. A dog can be kicked by it's owner and still seek affection from him. I have a Caique small 6-8 inchs tall.. And birds get pin feathers that hurt if touched the wrong way. This Caique will come up to be petted or scratched knowing she has pins that hurt and still rub her head against your hand and if it hurts her she'll bite the crap out of you for revenge. If you move your hand away from her she will chase it down and not stop till she gets her revenge. She won't naw on you forever but she will make it "even"

My Grey talks alot but occasionally gets bored and starts being loud to get our other two birds going then he'll be quiet for a few minutes and then tell the other two birds "cut it out your being to loud"

On top of that, for the uninitiated, an african grey is the size of a housecat. And can take a thumb off.

I've never had a Caique. We had a grey in the house when I was a kid, and I've had a few 'tiels, and a two species of finch (who... obviously aren't parrots, lol). You can hand-train finches, but it's a lot of work and with so many cats around in my case, not nearly worth the risk. One chomp or claw swipe and a finch would be toast. Cats can even kill them through the bars of the cage, which is part of why I'd rather have them with me. Roommate staying behind can take care of the cats who will scream bloody murder if they run out of food or water, but even finches... they're, mnnn, I wouldn't say "higher maintenance", but more caution has to be taken.

Thankfully because they're not parrots they're quite pleased to just be in their (nice and large, for them) cage. I definitely won't have bird poop all over my truck. IDK how people truck with even the most travel-happy of parrots unless they are On The Ball about cleanup, because parrots aren't pleased to just chill in their cage all day every day. They're too smart for it.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Cwc's Comment
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My Grey and one of the two Caiques use the trash can and the toilet. And yes in the cage when they must, the other Caique was a rescue and she is coming around slowly. But we haven't been training her as we did the other two. White paper plates. Put one in the area right in front of the door to the cage, open the door, bird climbs out and uses the bathroom on the plate... do this for a couple weeks and move the plate to the trashcan. Yes change the plate after each use.

So my favorite speach thing that happend with my Grey was when he learned the difference between a bath and a shower... Greys are powder birds vs oily skin... He would say "wanna take a shower" he goes in a stands on the curtain rod and soaks up the steam... well one day he said "wanna take a bath" so I filled the tub up and put him in. He looked at me and said "WANNA TAKE A SHOWER!!!) and sounded just like a little kid and even put inflection on the word shower...

I couldn't quit laughing and smile every time I think of that.

Plot Twist!'s Comment
member avatar

My Grey and one of the two Caiques use the trash can and the toilet. And yes in the cage when they must, the other Caique was a rescue and she is coming around slowly. But we haven't been training her as we did the other two. White paper plates. Put one in the area right in front of the door to the cage, open the door, bird climbs out and uses the bathroom on the plate... do this for a couple weeks and move the plate to the trashcan. Yes change the plate after each use.

So my favorite speach thing that happend with my Grey was when he learned the difference between a bath and a shower... Greys are powder birds vs oily skin... He would say "wanna take a shower" he goes in a stands on the curtain rod and soaks up the steam... well one day he said "wanna take a bath" so I filled the tub up and put him in. He looked at me and said "WANNA TAKE A SHOWER!!!) and sounded just like a little kid and even put inflection on the word shower...

I couldn't quit laughing and smile every time I think of that.

Ahaha, he learned an important lesson that day: be careful what you ask for!

Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
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Altitude might make a difference too, not just bounce. My cat yawns more in the mountains and since my eyes pop I'm assuming his are too.

Do different birds handle the altitude differently???

Cwc's Comment
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Not so much. Birds are built to fly. And that's actually an over simplified way of stating it. We get tired from lack of oxygen but birds have massive sized lungs that make up most of their chest cavity. Also their sinus and ear are built differently so no popping and all that.

What generally is the problem with birds travelling is car sickness. They will literally throw up for hours if they are affected by it. And may even be miss judged for something else... When a bird tries to feed you it's a sign of affection.... Strangely enough it looks pretty spot on for car sickness... So while you think that poor bird loves you it ,unbeknownst to you, wants nothing more than to get out of the car and remove your larynx for having subjected it to that kind of treatment.

But not all birds are affected by it.

Plot Twist!'s Comment
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Yeah, like some airlines let you bring pet birds with you like you might bring a cat etc. Doesn't bother them the same way.

As for car sickness, I'll probably drive them around for a few hours in my car to see how they respond since it's been yeeeaaars, before I really consider sticking them in a truck for a month. I read that not letting them see out the side of the vehicle is key, which shouldn't be much problem in the back (and I tend to keep a beach towel wrapped around the sides and back of the cage anyway). I've also seen people say here and there that the more a bird flies, the less likely they are to get motion sick in a car.

My finches are in a flight cage and fly and fly and fly. When they invariably escape during any kind of cage transfer etc, it takes forever for them to wear out of flapping around in my bathroom (only room I do these things in, with the toilet seat down of course). They're strong little fuzzballs! Usually caged finches wear out fast, but my pair are a couple of workout fiends and they're in a big enough cage to do loops while also having four or five different perches (of different sizes and shapes, for toe health) that they land on whenever.

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