Backing Practice™ 19 - Claremont Paper Mill

Topic 17500 | Page 1

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Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

This Backing Practice™ was sent to me by Stewart A, who is not a member, but admits to lurking. In an email he said

First off, I'm sorry for not being a truck driver and contacting you with this but it is a place I have gone by a number of times and felt bad for the drivers that had to back into this dock. Especially in the winter backing up a pretty steep slope into a very narrow and blind side back.

This one is in Claremont NH on Allen ST. for the Claremont paper mill. The whole street is only about the length of 5 tractor trailers so it can't be missed.

The three views you have here are of a truck in place with the overhead view. One is directly in front of the empty dock from the street and a mark showing about where your front bumper ends up when parked and the other is from about where you would start your backing from. One of the glitches to this is the pitch change right at the turn from uphill to level so you can't see any of the surface you are backing onto until after you would have your tandems on the wood surface and your tractor was high enough to see it.

First off, I'm sorry for not being a truck driver and contacting you with this but it is a place I have gone by a number of times and felt bad for the drivers that had to back into this dock. Especially in the winter backing up a pretty steep slope into a very narrow and blind side back.

This one is in Claremont NH on Allen ST. for the Claremont paper mill. The whole street is only about the length of 5 tractor trailers so it can't be missed.

The four views you have here are a Google Maps picture, and a truck in place with the overhead view. One is directly in front of the empty dock from the street and a mark showing about where your front bumper ends up when parked and the other is from about where you would start your backing from. One of the glitches to this is the pitch change right at the turn from uphill to level so you can't see any of the surface you are backing onto until after you would have your tandems on the wood surface and your tractor was high enough to see it.

Google Maps: overhead view of truck driver's backing problem in Claremont New Hampshire

Overhead: overhead view of truck driver's backing problem in Claremont New Hampshire

Street Views:

overhead view of truck driver's backing problem in Claremont New Hampshireoverhead view of truck driver's backing problem in Claremont New Hampshire

=÷=÷=÷=÷=÷=÷=÷=÷=÷=÷=÷=÷

If you have an interesting trailer backing situation, send it to me. I need at least an address, better is your screen shot, done up with your drawing & notes is best. Make a description I can copy into the post. If you search for Backing Practice™, you'll see how popular these are.

Send information to me at TT.errolv@spamgourmet.com

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Plot Twist!'s Comment
member avatar

Maybe it's my lack of a CDL (let alone experience with backing into docks) talking, but man, that looks like such a mess...

shocked.png

Lurking furiously to see what solutions folks have.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Stewart does point out you are backing up a hill. Look to the left of the road in the street views. You can see the drop from the road to the building. And the wooden planks are actually the roadway over a bridge you need to back over!

Plot Twist!'s Comment
member avatar

Yeah, I noticed all that! Looks pre-tty terrifying to me.

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Yeah, I noticed all that! Looks pre-tty terrifying to me.

You will learn these things, Grasshopper. And excel without fear!

Plot Twist!'s Comment
member avatar

I actually take it as a good sign that I'm equal parts terrified... and equal parts dying to know the trick to it.

I guess terrified's the wrong word. "I have a healthy respect for the problem at hand" just isn't as succinct!

Farmerbob1's Comment
member avatar

While this is definitely a dangerous back, it's not technically challenging. The critical part here is how do you reduce your risks!

The first thing I would do as a solo driver is ask the mill if they will put someone on the road over the hill to stop traffic for me while I am backing.

A team could have the other teammate get out and stop traffic.

If there is no traffic help, I would set out my red triangles, AND the three little orange cones I bought at Staples. Orange and red all over the crest of the road.

After that, it's 'just' a blind side backing maneuver into a herringbone parking space.

Granted, it IS narrow. The driver WILL need to Get Out And Look at least a couple times.

Again, the challenging part is how to reduce your risks. If the mill wouldn't help, and I put out triangles and cones, but cars were driving around them, I would call local police and ask them to stop traffic for me.

There's a chance that I would call local police regardless, to ask for a brief traffic stop, if the scene seemed worse in person than it appears in these pictures.

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