A True Story About The Consequences Of Refusing Loads

Topic 18398 | Page 1

Page 1 of 3 Next Page Go To Page:
Old School's Comment
member avatar

So far this week I have run two loads that are going onto this weeks pay period. The first one carried me up to New Hampshire from Louisiana with eight stops, and then my back-haul run bringing me back to my dedicated customer in Delhi, Louisiana. Those two loads total 3,132 miles, and I nailed all the appointment times while still managing to finish the final stop in New Hampshire one full day in advance of the scheduled appointment.

So, I am back in Delhi today resting on my ten hour break when my phone rings, and it is my dispatcher wanting to discuss the next batch of loads with me to see which direction I would like to go. He reads me off several different loads and I chose one of them which was a one stop run down to Miami. Then he says, "There is a possibility of that load not actually going out yet for a few days, could you also choose a different one and I will call you back a little later when I know if that Miami load is going to actually go or not?" My response was, "Sure, I'll take that one that has one stop in Louisville, Kentucky, and then finals in North Collins, New York." He hesitates just a moment and says, "You know what, I have got two guys who have really been complaining that they are not getting enough miles, and I feel like I should really at least offer that load to them first. Can I call you back after I know what is going on with that Miami load? Then I will have had the time to offer this North Collins load to those other two drivers, and I will have a better idea of what we should do with you." My response was, "Sure, you know I will be happy with what ever you come up with. I've already run in excess of 3,000 miles this week, and I can finish any of those loads you've got for this weekend in time to put it on this same pay period - those loads are just icing on the cake this week!"

About an hour later my phone is ringing again. "Well neither one of those drivers wants to go up to the Northeast, and the Miami load is not going to actually be ready yet," says my dispatcher with some degree of incredulity in his voice. He adds, "I don't understand these drivers, they tell me they want miles, but then they refuse to take the longer runs when I offer them, because of where they go to." "It looks like you are going to North Collins, New York after all, and they can stay on Louisiana to Texas runs for the next month as far as I am concerned!"

I don't get the mentality of some of these folks, but they sure are working hard to pad my paychecks! Let's see, this load is 1,150 miles, and I'll finish it by the payroll cut-off. Add that on top of the 3,132 I just completed... Yep, this week is looking really nice!

Make sure you are delivering on time or early, and keep yourself available when ever possible folks. Go for all you can get. Be a willing player, that is how you end up being counted on as a runner. That is how to be successful at this game, you've got to be a contender for the rewards of the game.

Did you catch what the attitude of the dispatcher was? They always remember the folks who help them out, but they even have a stronger memory for the folks who refuse to help when called upon.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Pete B.'s Comment
member avatar

Some things I never tire of: seeing deer in the wild, clouds mixing it up w/these Andes Mts., and lessons from Old School on what it takes to be successful in this industry. Thanks OS, your posts are worth their weight in gold!

Bill F.'s Comment
member avatar

Driver asks for more miles. Dispatcher offers more miles. Driver refuses more miles.

shooting_ourselves_in_the_foot_shoot_the

How can anyone not understand this?

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Eric H.'s Comment
member avatar

I haven't even begun training yet but I already have a better attitude then them. Once I'm in my own truck I don't care where the load is going, I'll be more then happy to take it.

I don't get those two drivers either. If your wheels aren't turning you're not making money. Or, well at least not any good money....

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Michael S.'s Comment
member avatar

Old School; I have three questions.

How many hours do you have on your clock, including recap? When is your pay period cut off, is it Sunday? Do you plan to make these deliveries Saturday and Sunday, or what is your plan to deliver?

Old School's Comment
member avatar

I have three and a half hours with no re-caps coming back. So... I am doing a reset which started at approximately 0800 this morning (Friday).

Pay period cuts off at 10:00 a.m. Tuesday.

I will deliver my stop in Louisville, KY at 0700 Monday morning, at which time my ten hour break will be over because I will have slept at that customer's location.

Then I roll on to North Collins, NY and sleep in my customer's yard so they unload me first thing Tuesday morning.

My dispatcher already has my PTA (projected time of availability) and knows that not only will I be empty at that time, but have a full days clock ahead and ready for action!

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Bud A.'s Comment
member avatar

Another gem, Old School! I have a question, too. Why was your first choice the Miami load?

OK, two questions. Do you get regular backhauls out of south Florida, or are you like most of the rest of us and have to deadhead 500 miles out of there for your next load?

Deadhead:

To drive with an empty trailer. After delivering your load you will deadhead to a shipper to pick up your next load.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Very astute question Bud.

I bring in approximately an extra 1,800 bucks each quarter in bonus money. There are several measurements involved in that bonus, one of which is fuel mileage. As a dedicated driver on this SAPA account they never leave me sitting anywhere because they want us back to the plant in Delhi as quickly as possible. Consequently, we seldom have a backhaul load lined up on those Florida runs, and if they can't find one they dead head us back.

SAPA has agreed to pay those deadhead miles as long as Knight is making efforts to find us something. We sometimes get a load of aluminum logs from one of the ports that go to our plant, and we sometimes get a load out of the SAPA plant in San Augustine, Florida.

Most of the time we run back empty. That just puts a little padding in that formula that my bonus money is calculated by. There ya go...

That's my story, and I'm sticking to it!

Deadhead:

To drive with an empty trailer. After delivering your load you will deadhead to a shipper to pick up your next load.

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Gladhand's Comment
member avatar

Funny how these guys want the whole world, but aren't willing to do anything for it. I'll be honest, I don't like going east of i25 haha, but if I have to i will. Have to go where the money is. I think i been running good right now because I am willing to run the northwest, thankfully the snow has slowed down haha.

We need more people like you old school. Being proactive and getting er done. Little by little I follow what you guys say and it works.

BillTheSlink's Comment
member avatar

When I grow up I want to be just like Old School.good-luck-2.gif

Seriously, Old School's attitude is great. The sad fact is those two drivers who refused the loads are likely to be on YouTube soon moaning how Knight is some gowd awful company and scaring people looking for a career in trucking with a good company.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Page 1 of 3 Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

This topic has the following tags:

Advice For New Truck Drivers Hard Lessons Learned Truck Driver Salary Truck Driving Stories
Click on any of the buttons above to view topics with that tag, or you can view a list of all forum tags here.

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More