Frustrations With Werner Enterprises, I'm Finished With Them

Topic 18670 | Page 2

Page 2 of 10 Previous Page Next Page Go To Page:
Cwc's Comment
member avatar

Truckers themselves would be better off if they read it themselves. I've worked for a major carrier and I was laid off from a smaller carrier, the OP will figure out what I mean by that.

I also was a team driver so no sympathy for sleeping during the day in a moving truck. I think you'll find this is a norm for a lot of folks on this forum... if most of us could do it what makes him special?

ad356's Comment
member avatar

For someone who does not have a family a large carrier is probably OK. i don't mean to single Werner out, they aren't the only ones, but running student drivers with little or no experience is dangerous and not the best training regimen. team driving students seems to be an industry problem. as far as Werner, i respect that CL is running the company again so to speak, the trucks were nice, and there are things that aren't terrible. they seem to respect safety in the sense they will allow to park it if the weather is bad, and will allow you to re-route around bad weather. i do not want to sound like i am badmouthing them, i just am making the suggestion that people try for a small to medium sized carrier instead of just going to the mega carriers. my exp really could have been much better. Werner is the only mega carrier i have ever worked for but i have been told they are all the same. avoid them when possible. i got my CDL back in November, so yes i am new to this and i will admit that. however sitting people around in a hotel away from their family and offering you no training while you are there stinks. no simulator, no backing, nothing. i should be an expert backer with the time i was sitting there. they should and can be more efficient with training.

as far as my new opportunity, if everything matches at least closely to what i was told it will be a much better fit. if i get home every weekend including training, it will be a pretty good fit. they only have 4 trainers and vet them heavily. not just anyone can be a trainer there. i really felt i was pushed through Werner's training program without really getting proper training, they were ready to give me my own truck already and i felt i was no where near ready with the limited backing i received. safety is #1, im not looking to hit anyone or cause property damage. i also felt that since i was driving while the trainer was sleeping and vesa versa for allot of the time, i was teaching myself how to drive.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
ad356's Comment
member avatar

I actually did not want to work for a large carrier to begin with. i got my CDL and tried my due diligence to find a local job with a mom and pop operation. i probably called 30 companies the week after i got my CDL. i went with Werner because the way i saw it, they were better then swift or CR england. i still believe they are. after calling 30 or 40 smaller companies, i came across a common obstacle. the insurance obstacle, the small carriers will not hire you because the insurance companies wont allow them to hire you. its impossible to get your start at a small outfit anymore. Werner kind of was like a last resort. then i discovered a much smaller company that would hire me, its a privately owned family run company. i think they will be a better fit.

did i fail? NO i drove through major cities of LA, Dallas, ect ect. i did allot of that driving while my trainer was snoozing in the back. i did not have accidents. i drove into black ice while he was sleeping in the back, scared the poop right out me. i handled a dangerous situation safely with no close calls. did it meet my expectations? absolutely not. i did not expect to sit in a hotel and do nothing for days on end TWICE, that's 3+ weeks of my life i cannot get back. the recruiters told me one thing, and something completely different happened. dishonesty in order to make paid sales commission sucks. truth is the big carriers lie to the drivers.

i know someone who works for wadhams, and he said they aren't too shabby. im going to try them out. if at least 3/4 of what they are telling me is true it will be a better fit. i want to drive, but i also value time with my wife and child. after i have my time into the dry van division, switching over to a division that gets me home every day is something i certainly will explore.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

ad356's Comment
member avatar

Truckers themselves would be better off if they read it themselves. I've worked for a major carrier and I was laid off from a smaller carrier, the OP will figure out what I mean by that.

I also was a team driver so no sympathy for sleeping during the day in a moving truck. I think you'll find this is a norm for a lot of folks on this forum... if most of us could do it what makes him special?

i will NEVER run as a team. team driving is a choice, one that i will choose not to do. its a good for some but if you already having sleeping problems stay away from team driving. its not a requirement to work in trucking. it should not be a requirement for student drivers. i used to work in a milk plant and know allot of drivers that work for small companies, they always seemed to have work and they were home everyday. sure some jobs are seasonal.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Cwc's Comment
member avatar

All your posts sound as if you had no clue as to what to expect as an over the road driver.

Thinking a carrier was going to get you home for the weekends "even during training" those are not realistic expectations as a new driver.

Had you looked around on this site you would realize everyone feels as if they were rushed through training and that they didn't feel as if they got enough backing practice. The best part was expecting lots of trainers during winter... you know... when everyone is shut down due to inclement weather.

Over The Road:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Matt 's Comment
member avatar

Unfortunately the recruiters job is to get people hired and not all are honest.all recruiters aren't like that I am looking for pretty much the same as far as home time and have actually had a couple recruiters say that they wouldn't be able to do that but wish me the best of luck.

Cwc's Comment
member avatar

Unfortunately the recruiters job is to get people hired and not all are honest.all recruiters aren't like that I am looking for pretty much the same as far as home time and have actually had a couple recruiters say that they wouldn't be able to do that but wish me the best of luck.

Don't get me wrong it can be done.. but after you are a solo driver and done with training and after you have proven yourself as a reliable and safe driver.

But to expect it from the jump is umm..

Old School's Comment
member avatar

So now you are going to say that it isn't just Werner, the problem actually lies with all large carriers. And the reason you can say this is because...

i have been told they are all the same. avoid them when possible.

That is a unique statement. Pray, who is it that is telling you this stuff? Could it be that same brother in law who once worked for Werner, or maybe someone else with much more knowledge than him?

You see the vast majority of us work for large carriers, and even got our start with large carriers. They are some of the most successful trucking companies around. Their equipment is top notch, their emphasis on safety is over the top, and they have got all kinds of freight to keep us making good solid money. Have you ever considered how they got to be considered "large carriers?" Well it is because they have been successful, and that success came to them because they had happy loyal employees who helped them get to that point.

I certainly wouldn't begrudge a man who wants to be with his family, I miss mine severely at times. But that is no reason to blame the large carriers and come screaming in here like they are some kind of hateful organizations who try to separate folks from the people they love. It is part of the job! If you don't like it that is all fine and good, just stop trying to lay the blame on someone else.

i really felt i was pushed through Werner's training program without really getting proper training, they were ready to give me my own truck already and i felt i was no where near ready with the limited backing i received.

You see, this is the way EVERYBODY feels when they go through training. We teach this all the time. We warn people all the time that when they hand you the keys to your own truck, you are going to be asking yourself, "do they really think I am ready for this?" You could have made such a better start if you would have just been a part of our forum before you got a bee in your bonnet and came in here with guns a blazing.

You just didn't have any kind of understanding of what it was you were getting yourself into, and then you failed - you were not prepared.

I'm going to let you in on a dirty little secret... you are not prepared for what you are about to get into next either.

ad356's Comment
member avatar

Frankly the dishonesty started with the woman at the CDL school where i got my CDL. when i signed up for classes, one of the first things i asked the school was if i could get a local, home every night job driving truck after graduation. they told me that i would be able to do that. well about 3 weeks after graduating and trying my due diligence to get that local job, i came to realize that wont happen without at least driving regional first. i really dont have an interest in over the road driving and i was expecting not to care for it. if i was single or divorced fine, but i would like to prevent that. ALLOT of OTR drivers end up giving up their marriage, something im not prepared to do. as far as recruiters go, i hate being lied to; actually i despise it. it puts a very bad taste in my mouth as a first impression, honesty is always the best policy.

the company that i am going to informed me that students go home over the weekends, it was not an expectation or even a question. i assumed it would be similar, although probably not gone 8 weeks. they volunteered that information. the big deal for me is being home every weekend and working for a company that doesnt even run weekends. having up to 55 hours of home-time per week is a good gig. i have the advantage of having an "insider" that works in the milk hauling division. this is actually someone i knew from my days in the milk plants. he formerly worked for bugman milk hauling, a company that goes into my former employer. he now works for wadhams milk hauling division. he informed me that wadhams is an honest company that has integrity and he actually likes working there. he suggested i look into them in the first place.

so yes, i would agree that so far this journey has been full of things that don't meet expectations. hopefully the new company is a good fit for me, and i will just bite the bullet, and get my experience....... switch over to the fuel or milk hauling division in a year, that gets me home daily. if my goal is to be home as much as possible i think they are more aligned with my carrier objectives.

thank god my wife has been supportive of me through all of this. i married a good woman

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Over The Road:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

ad356's Comment
member avatar

All your posts sound as if you had no clue as to what to expect as an over the road driver.

Thinking a carrier was going to get you home for the weekends "even during training" those are not realistic expectations as a new driver.

Had you looked around on this site you would realize everyone feels as if they were rushed through training and that they didn't feel as if they got enough backing practice. The best part was expecting lots of trainers during winter... you know... when everyone is shut down due to inclement weather.

it wasn't so much that they were shut down for weather, more of them were shut down for the holidays. again poor recruiting tactics. when you already have 40 students warehoused in a hotel, why would you continue to recruit more people? makes no sense. here is some solutions, remove the recruiters from commission pay, place them on salary. stop giving them incentives to send too many students in for training. add to this the people at the terminal should call the recruiters and tell them they are full. i wonder how many students actually stay and how many get upset enough to cut bait and leave.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Over The Road:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Page 2 of 10 Previous Page Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More