Embarrassing, But I Gotta Fess Up

Topic 19803 | Page 1

Page 1 of 2 Next Page Go To Page:
Turtle's Comment
member avatar

At the shipper last Friday, a delay caused me to burn up the remainder of my 14 while being loaded. While unfortunate, I wasn't too concerned since I still had till Monday to deliver. Plenty of time.

Once I was finally loaded I rolled over to a corner of the lot next to a couple other trucks and set up to get my 10hr break. Hung out a bit, watched trucks roll in and out, grabbed some chow, and hit the sack.

I got up at 0330 to head out. Imagine my dismay when I saw a locked gate blocking my exit... Uh oh...

Thinking someone will show up at 0700, I didn't sweat it but instead crawled back in the bunk for a little more shut-eye.

By 0800 I was still all alone in this lot. That's when the "duh" moment hit me: It's the weekend, nobody will be coming until Monday morning. This is not good.

So I called the two contact numbers I had. No luck, these were office numbers with a voicemail telling me the hours are mon-fri etc. I even googled the contact names hoping to get a cell number or facebook profile, something. Nada.

Facing the realization of spending the weekend here in this dusty lot, along with the fear of a service failure, I had to make the call of shame to weekend dispatch. He said he'd see what he can do, but he had the same contact numbers as I did, so I didn't expect much success.

At 0930 a pickup rolled up to the gate. Great, I'm getting out! He rolled his window down as I walked up to the gate and asks me "Are you the one who's letting me in?"

Um no I was hoping you'd be letting me out.

Turns out he was a contractor there to do some concrete work over the weekend. Someone was to be letting him in at 10am. WooHoo for me!

So the guy shows up and apologized profusely for not seeing me when he locked up the previous night. I'm not sure how he missed this big red truck of mine but nonetheless I took the blame for assuming I could park there. They do have overnight parking, but it's outside the gate across the road.

That was a valuable lesson, one that could've cost me much more than just the embarrassment.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Eric G.'s Comment
member avatar

Chin up, part of the job is the lumps that come with it. There is no manual on how to do this job 100% of the time. Sometimes we learn by making judgement calls and learning from the fallout that comes with them.

Stay safe

Cornelius A.'s Comment
member avatar

Turtle I have spilled water all over my desk laughing... good you were able to get out lol

Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

::hangs head::: same happened to me at a produce place but I knew they were coming back in the morning.

Live and learn. Now just think...dispatch knows that you not only messed up but got out of it. Maybe not of your own doing but so what. You solved a problem they didn't have to. By next week they will only remember an accident occurring that day.

I can't imagine the panic you felt though lol

Pianoman's Comment
member avatar

Haha that is hilarious! Not embarrassing at all in my opinion. Keep on trucking!

Bud A.'s Comment
member avatar

Oh man, that would be a real panic moment!

So the guy shows up and apologized profusely for not seeing me when he locked up the previous night. I'm not sure how he missed this big red truck of mine but nonetheless I took the blame for assuming I could park there. They do have overnight parking, but it's outside the gate across the road.

That was a valuable lesson, one that could've cost me much more than just the embarrassment.

It's always a good idea to ask if it's OK to park at a shipper or a receiver, even if you've done it before. It shows respect for them and their property, and sometimes it brings up some important information like the gate's going to be locked. I had that happen once, almost didn't ask but decided I'd better, and found out I would be locked in over the weekend. But there was a spot just outside the gate that worked.

In the end, no harm, no foul. Glad it worked out!

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

That's hilarious!

rofl-3.gif

It's actually nothing to be embarrassed about or anything. I mean, they obviously should have let you know to move on out of there before they locked you in. That's on them. You just parked in the lot to take a nap. I don't think anyone would expect to be locked in.

Glad you got out though.

Now if anyone asks you, "Didn't living in that truck feel like being in prison?"

You can say, "One time it did!"

smile.gif

LDRSHIP's Comment
member avatar

Wish I could sympathize, but I can only give you empathy on this one. Never been locked in. I have sat over a weekend at a customer before because I had a Saturday delivery and they don't work weekends, lol

Papa Bear's Comment
member avatar

Well, but you were at the end of your clock. Because of the loading time. What were you supposed to do, bust your clock to go find somewhere else to park? (Seriously.) What if you have been pulled over for a log check on your way to somewhere else to park?

Diver Driver's Comment
member avatar

That's funny !! Especially since I had a similar experience just yesterday.

I get to my 01, just after closing hrs. The guy informs me that everyone is gone, because "you were supposed to be here 3hrs ago. " (I was getting unloaded from my pervious load, so it's not on me. 😉) But since it was only 3 pallets, he'd load my truck his self.

So I get loaded, slide my tandems , do my depart call, and roll to the gate...... NOTHING. Give a friendly honk on the horn...NOTHING. I look at the employee parking lot and see not a single car. I call the contact number, and get an answer "I'm at the gate, can you let me out?" "Ummm sir, where are you ?" It's the damn answering service... I explain the situation, and they remotely open the gate. Ever notice that this always happens when your clock is winding down to nothing?

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Page 1 of 2 Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More