Game: Rookie Unrealistic Expectations

Topic 20287 | Page 2

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6 string rhythm's Comment
member avatar

Rainy, I'm confused with your very first itemized "unrealistic expectation." Going local right out of CDL school is certainly not an unrealistic expectation. Rookie drivers do it all the time in the greater Harrisburg, York, and Carlisle area of Pennsylvania. I did. It's quite common here.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Natedog1971's Comment
member avatar

We used to have what we're called bookstores so I went to a used book store and bought a case of books. I would trade them in every so often when I finished a bunch of them.

That's a great point, despite the internet and tablets, I still like to read an actual book. Remember seeing the used book section at the library when I took my kids, $0.50 per book, may have to pick up a few. I typically read one a day or two days so maybe a crate is a good idea but once I'm done training.

Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

Rainy, I'm confused with your very first itemized "unrealistic expectation." Going local right out of CDL school is certainly not an unrealistic expectation. Rookie drivers do it all the time in the greater Harrisburg, York, and Carlisle area of Pennsylvania. I did. It's quite common here.

Awesome you have those opportunities in your area. Some areas aren't like that. In my area even if you do find a local job, without the one year OTR experience, you make about half what an experienced driver would make which isnt enough to live on here. Plus, NJ has really high insurance. Even my friend who owns his own fleet of ten trucks told me to wait the year OTR then come work for him. He could still only guarantee three days a week home. He said the home every a night isn't as profitable for smaller companies due to bureaucratic BS costs.

The USPS contracts out their routes. I knew the schedules due to working at the processing center and thought I'd give a try at those.companies.

For regional home every other night I'd get $15 per hour. For a box truck home every night I'd get $12.50 an hour. I made $26-40 per hour in the processing center. So why spend thousands to get the CDL to make half? Aldi's cashiers are making $11.50 per hour in my area.

That amount in WV or AL might be great. But not here. Not for a single person.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
ChickieMonster's Comment
member avatar

Rainy, I've never had to turn my truck in and I've spent 2 separate stretches of 6 days at home.

To me it's strange that y'all have to do that.

Unholychaos's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Rainy, I'm confused with your very first itemized "unrealistic expectation." Going local right out of CDL school is certainly not an unrealistic expectation. Rookie drivers do it all the time in the greater Harrisburg, York, and Carlisle area of Pennsylvania. I did. It's quite common here.

double-quotes-end.png

Awesome you have those opportunities in your area. Some areas aren't like that. In my area even if you do find a local job, without the one year OTR experience, you make about half what an experienced driver would make which isnt enough to live on here. Plus, NJ has really high insurance. Even my friend who owns his own fleet of ten trucks told me to wait the year OTR then come work for him. He could still only guarantee three days a week home. He said the home every a night isn't as profitable for smaller companies due to bureaucratic BS costs.

The USPS contracts out their routes. I knew the schedules due to working at the processing center and thought I'd give a try at those.companies.

For regional home every other night I'd get $15 per hour. For a box truck home every night I'd get $12.50 an hour. I made $26-40 per hour in the processing center. So why spend thousands to get the CDL to make half? Aldi's cashiers are making $11.50 per hour in my area.

That amount in WV or AL might be great. But not here. Not for a single person.

A buddy of mine was able to get a local job right out school with Coke hauling product to various places and stock shelves and coolers. Too much leg work for me haha!

Any myths I had were pretty much busted when I went on a 2 week ride along with my uncle. Really put a lot of things in perspective just from an observer point of view.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Tim H.'s Comment
member avatar

I thought I would like the solitude more than I do. I like solitude but enjoy company too.

Gladhand's Comment
member avatar

Rainy, I've never had to turn my truck in and I've spent 2 separate stretches of 6 days at home.

To me it's strange that y'all have to do that.

Think it has to do with demand for trucks and costs. Swift is the same. More than 3 days, hand in the keys

Sweet Jimmy's Comment
member avatar

As a rookie myself, I just did my first "drive all night". My unrealistic expectation was that when my partner and I swapped this morning, that I'd get in the bunk and sleep my whole 10 hours. That top bunk is NOT the place to get any sleep. Tips from any team drivers here on how to best sleep while rolling will be much appreciated. I think I slept 2 hours, at least I can sleep in my bed tonight.

Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar

Rainy, I'm confused with your very first itemized "unrealistic expectation." Going local right out of CDL school is certainly not an unrealistic expectation. Rookie drivers do it all the time in the greater Harrisburg, York, and Carlisle area of Pennsylvania. I did. It's quite common here.

I'm not in same area you are, but here in Iowa there's local companies hiring you and then sending you to school on their dime, that you're home every night and make great money. I actually just had my first day of class today. They are paying for my schooling with a 1 year contract, but also paying me 15 an hr while in class (40 hours a week for 4 weeks), then goes up to nearly 23 an hr once CDL in hand and going through 12 weeks 1 on 1 training with the company. Also being paid a meal allowance per day of 50 dollars, they're paying my lodging as school is 200 miles from home, and paying me 87 cents per mile driven in personal vehicle from time I left home til I return after week of class ( 47 cents per mile is company rate when travelling for work, and 40 cents depreciation on vehicle).

This is foodservice delivery as opposed to the LTL gig you landed, But this is exactly the kind of agreement I've needed to finally jump in. Its only 1 year, which I know it's gonna be difficult backs and very labor intensive but after the 1 year I'll re evaluate how I feel physically and decide what I want to do. I've wanted to do this for quite some time but having young kids (year and a half, and a 4 month old), and making nearly 60k a year at my warehouse job made me put it on hold.

To anybody reading this that may feel this is how they want to join the industry as well.....keep in mind I have over 5 years foodservice warehouse experience and what I was offered was, in my opinion, a way of luring me away from Sysco (previous company) and switch over to PFG (current company) as they felt I'd be a perfect match knowing the physicality involved as well as knowing the product as it's very similar between the two.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Unholychaos's Comment
member avatar

As a rookie myself, I just did my first "drive all night". My unrealistic expectation was that when my partner and I swapped this morning, that I'd get in the bunk and sleep my whole 10 hours. That top bunk is NOT the place to get any sleep. Tips from any team drivers here on how to best sleep while rolling will be much appreciated. I think I slept 2 hours, at least I can sleep in my bed tonight.

Never have and never will be a team driver, but I'd personally try and work it out with your co that if one is driving, the other sleeps in the bottom bunk. Speaking strictly from a safety standpoint, even you have the safety net latched in, what if it somehow comes undone or breaks and you get into a wreck? I know I'd feel more comfortable lower to the ground.

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