Local Food Service As A Rookie

Topic 20873 | Page 4

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Rob T.'s Comment
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This next picture is how the trailer looked at my 3rd stop. My 2nd stop had a dock as well as a pallet jack so I was able to move the cooler pallets to the side with dry pallets so I could reach the bulkhead and get the frozen out through the backend rather than using the steps.

0659424001513971570.jpg the reason the blue blankets are on top of the pallets is to help protect the produce. It will help keep them warm in winter, and cooler in the summer.

Bulkhead:

A strong wall-like structure placed at the front of a flatbed trailer (or on the rear of the tractor) used to protect the driver against shifting cargo during a front-end collision. May also refer to any separator within a dry or liquid trailer (also called a baffle for liquid trailers) used to partition the load.

Rob T.'s Comment
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Here is a picture of how we normally have to access the freezer until we can reach bulkhead (typically last couple stops)

0292169001513971872.jpg

It gets tiring, and is not very efficient to use the side door like that. That is why i move the pallets if I have the space to, and access to a pallet jack. I hate only being able to get maybe 10 cases out at a time before needing to climb down to stack on wheeler and repeat..

We have to use side door because were a domicile yard. We get our trailers by someone dragging a set of doubles out to us. Obviously they want to get as much as possible. Sysco runs a 53 footer around because their warehouse is in town, and most of their stuff is loaded on one side of trailer so they don't need to climb into a side door.

Bulkhead:

A strong wall-like structure placed at the front of a flatbed trailer (or on the rear of the tractor) used to protect the driver against shifting cargo during a front-end collision. May also refer to any separator within a dry or liquid trailer (also called a baffle for liquid trailers) used to partition the load.

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

Rob T.'s Comment
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In order to get to the product I needed at the current stop I had to tear the pallet apart. To be most efficient its best to sort and segregate as you tear it down. I put the following stop on the left side, and the stop after that closest to the tail. in training i was always told "you touched it, now do something with it" it pays to keep the trailer organized. 0850852001513972137.jpg

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Rob T.'s Comment
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An empty trailer (minus a return) makes me happy....you'll also notice my 2 wheeler dolly. That is all I have to help me get my trailer unloaded.

0179171001513972400.jpg

Rob T.'s Comment
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After I'm done with a strap I immediately hook it to the side. There are far soo many instances of drivers (across all companies in this sector) falling out of trailers. I make it a point to keep the straps and plastic wrap picked up, to help me avoid that common hazard.

0123126001513972488.jpg

Ithel's Comment
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Good luck with the cold today, Rob.

John P.'s Comment
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Good luck with the cold today, Rob.

John P.'s Comment
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Weld one an good luck

Rob T.'s Comment
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Good luck with the cold today, Rob.

Thankfully I'm off Saturdays and Sundays (and Tuesdays), although due to new years they tweeked my schedule to B off Saturday thru Monday instead. The last couple days have sucked between the snow. And ice. The cold has been more of an inconvenience than anything. I've had to turn my reefer up in my cooler compartment to pump out heat to try and keep trailer warm enough so produce doesn't go bad. Only really have to deal with the cold while wheeling down the ramp and into the business. Did end up falling on my butt,then back on Thursday cuz customer didn't salt their steps..that was fun.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Rob T.'s Comment
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Thursday was nerve racking. We had gotten hit with snow. And some freezing rain that made I-80 and I-35 a skating rink. I left my house about 230am for a 330 start time. That gave me time to get the truck I was taking warmed up while I waited for my trailer to arrive. Due to the snow and ice I got started a half hour late. I was already irritated because I had been hoping I would be done early, as it was my sons 2nd bday, but was scheduled a 12 hour day. I didn't allow running late to make me drive faster than I felt comfortable doing and instead moved faster while unloading. Due to Christmas making us a day behind on our deliveries I was sent on my typical Wednesday route that takes me south on I-35. Thankfully about 20 miles south the roads weren't as bad and I was able to go a little faster although an OTR driver put his truck in the ditch just ahead of me. At one of my stops they hadn't shovelled or salted their sidewalk. Their shovel was broken and didn't have salt so I took the salt out of my tractor and salted sidewalk prior to unloading. When I was taking my last load of frozen (from side door of trailer) up ramp i ended up falling onto my butt then my back. Thankfully I was ok, but still reported it in case it hurt later. This place has a concrete ramp that is about 6 feet long that goes up about 2 feet, then has a flat area just outside their food that's maybe 3 feet long. I backed my truck into a position that allowed me to not use their ramp, and I put the ramp from my trailer on the top. Just outside the door. I stacked everything up inside my trailer so I could just scoop it up with my dolly and run it in. After it was all stacked up and I was ready to take it in I propped the kitchen door open despite it being really cold. One of the lady's in the kitchen told me "I'm sorry hunny but this door has to stay closed, it is way too cold out here". Unfortunately I let my frustration get the best of me and said some things I shouldn't have...to the effect of I already fell once, it will not happen again, as well as This door stays open or I'm taking everything left on the trailer with me. Of course there was profanity involved, which I regret acting in such an unprofessional way. She immediately apologized and fortunately this is a customer that I get along with quite well and they know that I was upset (rightfully so) and they let it go. Once I started on the back county roads the snow decided to start up again. Ended up being a 14 hour day, and only got to see my bday boy for an hour before he went to sleep.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

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