Found Out Why RMD GPS Products Do Not Route A Lot Of Trucks Over The GWB Had To Share It

Topic 21448 | Page 1

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Kevin L.'s Comment
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Ok So here is what I found. Truck with 53' trailers carrying divisible loads (any load that cn be broken down into smaller loads) are prohibited in NYC. 53' trailers carrying loads that cannot be divided to trailers that are shorter require special oversize permits. That is according to the NYC DOT. The bridge itself is controlled by the New York - New Jersey Port authority which has no prohibition on the length of the trailers.

What that tells me is that if you go over the GWB into NY as soon as you hit the NY side they could technically pull you over and unless you have a permit they could seriously fine you. I am not sure if that ticket would be driver or company responsibility but I think it would fall upon the driver. I wonder how many companies force dispatch drivers into NYC with 53 foot trailers and no permits. How many drivers really know the risk they are taking.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Think about what you are saying here...the GW Bridge is used by through trucks, most of which are headed to points south and not destined for NYC. They are passing through and risk nothing by doing that.

53' trailers are perfectly legal for the Interstates (like I-95) and other designated truck routes that go through and around NYC. Once off the Interstates, it depends exactly where you are headed. When quoting guidance it's important to read and understand all of it.

Here is the link: NYC DOT law

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Think about what you are saying here...the GW Bridge is used by through trucks, most of which are headed to points north or south and not destined for NYC. They are passing through and risk nothing by doing that.

53' trailers are perfectly legal for the Interstates (like I-95) and other designated truck routes that go through and around NYC. Once off the Interstates, it depends exactly where you are headed. When quoting guidance it's important to read and understand all of it.

Here is the link: NYC DOT law

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

Who wants to go the GW anyway? i avoid that bridge at all costs. and did you think about the tolls for 5 axles? its like $105 or something which they want to raise

Kevin L.'s Comment
member avatar

So they are allowed to drive a 53 ft trailer through the city on certain sections of certain interstate highways but no deliveries with 53 ft without a permit.

Basically dispatchers won't say pick up this load on a 53 ft trailer and deliver it to nyc unless the address happens to be on the highway itself or the driver is given a trip permit

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Robert B. (The Dragon) ye's Comment
member avatar

I'd love too see your source for this info Kevin because it's completely false. I've taken several loads into all the boroughs and have never even heard of this. Heck, there's a cold storage facility not even a mile from the WTC. Trucks are in and out of there all the time with everything you can think of and the only thing you need a permit for would be over dimensional loads or parking at a jobsite for a delivery which falls on the customer.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

I run divisible flatbed loads on 53 foot trailers over the GWB and through the Bronx all the time. Never had any issues.

I'm wondering if you are confusing the fact that you can't permit oversize loads that are divisible. I don't know how you came up with this confusion.

Splitter's Comment
member avatar

I run divisible flatbed loads on 53 foot trailers over the GWB and through the Bronx all the time. Never had any issues.

I'm wondering if you are confusing the fact that you can't permit oversize loads that are divisible. I don't know how you came up with this confusion.

From G-Town's NYCDOT link:

Trucks with 53-foot trailers may only travel on the portions of I-95, I-695, I-295, and I-495 that cross the city between the Bronx-Westchester County line and Queens-Nassau County line. 53-foot trailers carrying non-divisible loads must apply for a New York City Permit.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

icecold24k's Comment
member avatar

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icecold24k's Comment
member avatar

I’m thinking he may have read the above I posted saying 53 foot trailers can’t make pick ups or delivery’s within the 5 bouroughs. It’s the NYC DOT site so it may not be accurate.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

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