Local Driving For SUre Winner Foods

Topic 21495 | Page 1

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Kyle B.'s Comment
member avatar

Company: Sure winner food Operation area: New england Terminals: Saco, Maine Sryicuse, New york Pay: 19.50 per hour 4 dollar inc for staying under 10 hrs)

Class A & B (major class b Trucks) ==== I sadly was let go of the company some time ago but this does give a different view of local deliverys. S.W.F is known as a hannaford Warehouse on top of being a frozen food delivery services. The storys the deliver to are Hannafor, market basket,Doller general, Walmart, shaws and several other. I was a class A driver/ cover driver in the begining, Covering routes that needed covering. Normaly Ill have 12 stops or slightly more depending on the day. All the delivers where paltizes and where normaly the whole pallet, We have powerjacks (that die quickly) to unload ourselfs. Half the time I had to go in during off hourse due to delays in the runs. (beer trucks Piorty trucks despite having priority my self at hannaford. ) Regardless I got the loads done regardless if I fell behind or not. ANd got along veyr well with management and Co workers. I was eventaly moved to a more stable position as a cross docker. THis one is different I have a class A truck I take it to Burlington,vt White river vt, (There is another but I cant remember where it is.) Manchester Nh, Or Hermon, maine, (rarely IO have to go father than that due to the driver running out of time.) And put the loads into a class B truck, Yes that means backing against another trailer, Using a dock plate and a power jack. (that dies allot). Trust me allot can go wrong, from Pallets falling over and having to restack, to The jack falling off due to poor dock placement. To messy drivers. (long story short the driver was fired). While during the winter I did some Deliverys on a friday or a saturday. I also picked up from one of two of our mandatory pick ups (friendlys or hood).

What happened?: So why was i let go? Well We haul icecream what is the one thing you NEVER do when hauling frozen foods?

Forget to turn on the refer in the other dirvers truck.. I eneded up doing that more than once. WHile only 1 load was lost, and the others saved (Abit where late) They let me go baised on that sadly.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Han Solo Cup's Comment
member avatar

Kyle, I've read through all your posts and I think you need to do two things. One, you need to slow down... a lot. If you really want to make trucking your career then it seems to me like you maybe need to take things at a much slower pace. That's not to say there's anything wrong with you, your approach, or your desire. It just sounds to me like you're trying to keep up with the big dogs who have been doing this for years and you can't; accept that you're a rookie and take it slow. I'm simply saying that based on the number of minor (and supposedly unreported) accidents you've had, missed directions, and forgotten instructions (like the reefer) that maybe you need to slow things down. And that's okay. There's some things in life that I can breeze through and there are other things I need to do at a snail's pace. And this is exactly why I haven't changed careers yet. I know I'll be slow for a while and my pay will suffer. I'm waiting till the home life and finances are such that we can support me learning at my own pace till I can prove I'm a top earner.

And two... I know we shouldn't pick on this but... your posts are atrocious. Many times I have to read and re-read and re-read again just to understand not only what you're saying but the general idea of what you're trying to convey. I can promise you that, as someone who does a lot of formal documentation, employers evaluate everything you do, say, and write. When a post looks like it's been run through a wood chipper, people immediately judge and label the author. I'm sorry but it happens. If your intra-company communication is anything like your posts here, then your employers have already judged and labeled you. Seriously, in addition to slowing things down driving-wise, slow down your text based communication. Read what you've written before you post or send via Qualcomm; it makes a huge difference.

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Kyle B.'s Comment
member avatar

Kyle, I've read through all your posts and I think you need to do two things. One, you need to slow down... a lot. If you really want to make trucking your career then it seems to me like you maybe need to take things at a much slower pace. That's not to say there's anything wrong with you, your approach, or your desire. It just sounds to me like you're trying to keep up with the big dogs who have been doing this for years and you can't; accept that you're a rookie and take it slow. I'm simply saying that based on the number of minor (and supposedly unreported) accidents you've had, missed directions, and forgotten instructions (like the reefer) that maybe you need to slow things down. And that's okay. There's some things in life that I can breeze through and there are other things I need to do at a snail's pace. And this is exactly why I haven't changed careers yet. I know I'll be slow for a while and my pay will suffer. I'm waiting till the home life and finances are such that we can support me learning at my own pace till I can prove I'm a top earner.

Thats the take away, Im taking it easyer now with W.E now then I was with the local job.

And two... I know we shouldn't pick on this but... your posts are atrocious. Many times I have to read and re-read and re-read again just to understand not only what you're saying but the general idea of what you're trying to convey. I can promise you that, as someone who does a lot of formal documentation, employers evaluate everything you do, say, and write. When a post looks like it's been run through a wood chipper, people immediately judge and label the author. I'm sorry but it happens. If your intra-company communication is anything like your posts here, then your employers have already judged and labeled you. Seriously, in addition to slowing things down driving-wise, slow down your text based communication. Read what you've written before you post or send via Qualcomm; it makes a huge difference.

I know My way of writing things is bad, I try to be sure Im proof reading my message. But like work I tend to rush when typing.

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Han Solo Cup's Comment
member avatar

Cool, at least you’re aware that you tend to rush things. Now, just start slowing everything down. As you become more proficient, the speed will pick up. Best of luck to you.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

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