HOS Question (Swift Style)

Topic 21523 | Page 1

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∆_Danielsahn_∆'s Comment
member avatar

Today, I arrived back at the Walmart DC, with 15 minutes left on my 14 hr clock. I had a back haul, and needed to fill the reefer can with fuel, before parking it. After parking, and doing my Mac 6 (empty) I was - 9 minutes, when I went off duty for my 10 hr.

Would this be considered an HOS violation? Would it effect my RA score? I went to ask my DL, but they were all busy, and now I am warm and comfy in my truck.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Today, I arrived back at the Walmart DC, with 15 minutes left on my 14 hr clock. I had a back haul, and needed to fill the reefer can with fuel, before parking it. After parking, and doing my Mac 6 (empty) I was - 9 minutes, when I went off duty for my 10 hr.

Would this be considered an HOS violation? Would it effect my RA score? I went to ask my DL, but they were all busy, and now I am warm and comfy in my truck.

I definitely know this routine...

As soon as I hit the gate upon returning to the WM DC, I shut the truck down before pulling the lock, sending a mac5 and submitting the seal card to security. Turning the ignition off automatically takes you off the drive line and on-duty, not driving status. As long as you do not exceed 15mph putt-putting to the reefer fuel bay and then dropping the trailer, you won't be on the drive-line.

Long story, short, you did nothing wrong.

BMI:

Body mass index (BMI)

BMI is a formula that uses weight and height to estimate body fat. For most people, BMI provides a reasonable estimate of body fat. The BMI's biggest weakness is that it doesn't consider individual factors such as bone or muscle mass. BMI may:

  • Underestimate body fat for older adults or other people with low muscle mass
  • Overestimate body fat for people who are very muscular and physically fit

It's quite common, especially for men, to fall into the "overweight" category if you happen to be stronger than average. If you're pretty strong but in good shape then pay no attention.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Just to clarify, you can be on-duty beyond the daily 14 hours. The rule is you cannot be on the drive-line beyond 14 hours. What you described; arriving back to your D.C. with 15 minutes remaining on your 14 is a regular occurrence. In fact, all things being equal my preference is to return with 30 minutes or less on the 14, usually indicating earning potential was maximized.

Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar

G town....just curious, do you guys have the 16 hour exemption? Or does swift/that account not like it? I don't blame companies for avoiding it....quite easy to violate HOS as it gets pretty complex

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

G town....just curious, do you guys have the 16 hour exemption? Or does swift/that account not like it? I don't blame companies for avoiding it....quite easy to violate HOS as it gets pretty complex

Only the local guys can invoke that, and it requires terminal manager approval.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar

Ahhh I gotcha, I thought you returned to DC every day. That's probably a good thing to require approval. I've only had to do it once and was worried I was gonna goof it up (despite my Elogs telling me what time I had)

double-quotes-start.png

G town....just curious, do you guys have the 16 hour exemption? Or does swift/that account not like it? I don't blame companies for avoiding it....quite easy to violate HOS as it gets pretty complex

double-quotes-end.png

Only the local guys can invoke that, and it requires terminal manager approval.

Elog:

Electronic Onboard Recorder

Electronic Logbook

A device which records the amount of time a vehicle has been driven. If the vehicle is not being driven, the operator will manually input whether or not he/she is on duty or not.

Elogs:

Electronic Onboard Recorder

Electronic Logbook

A device which records the amount of time a vehicle has been driven. If the vehicle is not being driven, the operator will manually input whether or not he/she is on duty or not.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Rob replied:

Ahhh I gotcha, I thought you returned to DC every day. That's probably a good thing to require approval. I've only had to do it once and was worried I was gonna goof it up (despite my Elogs telling me what time I had)

We all try to return. Local guys slip-seat in day cabs (defined as commuting to the D.C. every day, residing near-by).

The drivers "assigned" full condo sleepers, if need be can shutdown at a store for their 10 hour and typically don't need to invoke the exception.

Elog:

Electronic Onboard Recorder

Electronic Logbook

A device which records the amount of time a vehicle has been driven. If the vehicle is not being driven, the operator will manually input whether or not he/she is on duty or not.

Elogs:

Electronic Onboard Recorder

Electronic Logbook

A device which records the amount of time a vehicle has been driven. If the vehicle is not being driven, the operator will manually input whether or not he/she is on duty or not.

Day Cab:

A tractor which does not have a sleeper berth attached to it. Normally used for local routes where drivers go home every night.

Grumpy Old Man's Comment
member avatar

I am currently on the HOS portion of the High Road Training, and had a question.

Let's say, for example, I was tight on my 14, and pulled into a truck stop as my 14 expired. Could I then put myself as on duty, not driving, and park, fuel, etc? I know you said under 15 mph wouldn't show up, but I'm not sure every company's eLogs work the same. So for the purposes of HOS, would that count as drive time, even though I'm not on the road?

Thanks again for the High Road Training, it is an awesome tool. I am slowly learning to read the questions and answers very carefully, as almost every question I get wrong is because I didn't read carefully. Like the brake test, I kept missing the two minutes in the answer instead of one minute.

Elog:

Electronic Onboard Recorder

Electronic Logbook

A device which records the amount of time a vehicle has been driven. If the vehicle is not being driven, the operator will manually input whether or not he/she is on duty or not.

Elogs:

Electronic Onboard Recorder

Electronic Logbook

A device which records the amount of time a vehicle has been driven. If the vehicle is not being driven, the operator will manually input whether or not he/she is on duty or not.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Old School's Comment
member avatar

The answer is yes. You can be on duty as far past your 14 hour clock as needed. The 14 hour clock is merely a window of time that you must stop driving within. Once you reach that 14 hour limit you can no longer drive, but you can perform "on duty" tasks like fueling.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Just for clarification... your truck will have to be stopped for you to be able to change your logs. And if you have to move the truck from the fuel island to a parking spot it will not automatically switch you over to the "drive" line. It does automatically switch to the "drive" line when you get back out on the road, but not on such a small amount of movement like within the confines of the truck stop parking lot.

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