Sometimes Looking Isn't Enough.

Topic 22058 | Page 1

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Big Scott's Comment
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Yesterday I had a drop and hook. When I hooked to my empty, I did my routine. Back partially under, get out and look to see the fifth wheel and kingpin are aligned, if all is good, finish backing until I hear the click. Then get out with my flashlight and look to see that the jaws are locked around the trailer, if all looks good, raise the landing gear and hook up the lines. Pre trip the trailer and roll.

I pulled forward and thump. Something went wrong and the trailer fell on the back of my frame. CRAP!!. Thankfully it was an empty trailer and easy to raise up with the landing gear. Then I repeated backing under and looking. Once locked, I did what I forgot to do the first time, TUG TEST. Yes, trucking will humble you. When stuff happens, remain calm, think about the solution. If all else fails call dispatch and/or road service. This could have been much worse.

Stay safe out there and double check.

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

∆_Danielsahn_∆'s Comment
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Dropping a trailer is one of my biggest DOH! fears.

Brett Aquila's Comment
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I always did a tug test every single time I started moving the truck without exception. Whether I went into the truck stop for a moment, came out of the shipping office, finished fueling, or left my parking spot for the night it didn't matter. Every single time I started rolling I would release the tractor brake, give it a little pull to make sure the trailer was firmly attached, then release the trailer brake and roll. Every single time. You never know when someone might sneak in and pull that 5th wheel pin or some mechanical failure may have happened.

PackRat's Comment
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Kind of like the thread I wrote about two weeks ago...You were extremely lucky.

∆_Danielsahn_∆'s Comment
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I always did a tug test every single time I started moving the truck without exception. Whether I went into the truck stop for a moment, came out of the shipping office, finished fueling, or left my parking spot for the night it didn't matter. Every single time I started rolling I would release the tractor brake, give it a little pull to make sure the trailer was firmly attached, then release the trailer brake and roll. Every single time. You never know when someone might sneak in and pull that 5th wheel pin or some mechanical failure may have happened.

I am ocd about that. I also recheck the air lines, and piggy, do a visual lock jaw, and before I roll, I creep it to about 3mph and hit the trolley break, as a secondary test. (every stop)

Ever since I jumped the kingpin certain things have become ocd for me. Which is a good thing. I am more aware.

Big Scott's Comment
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I normally always do tug tests like Brett said. I just forgot that last night. All I wanted to do was get to the Pilot across the street and hit the head. I post my oopses here so others can learn from my stupidity. lol.

Diver Driver's Comment
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trucking will humble you.

Yes it will ! I just had an experience like that. I was in Detroit, and had just dropped my full trailer. I went and found an empty and was about to get it fueled up. (COMPLETELY empty) in the mean time, I get dispatched out of where I'm sitting. (No need to grab that trailer) I call over the CB to a Will Trans driver asking if he needs a trailer. He comes over and he says that he'll take it. But before he can get to his truck, he gets a dispatch out of the same place. (He no longer needs the trailer either) So I'm back to taking this trailer to get fueled. (I've got time, and I don't want to "Blue falcon" my fellow driver) I pull away, and BAM ! the trailer is now laying on my frame. Thankfully it was empty, and besides my pride, nothing else was hurt

Rainy D.'s Comment
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Dropping a trailer is one of my biggest DOH! fears.

If you pull out really really slowly, and it does drop on the frame....you can crank up the trailer, and if loaded, drop the air bags to get back under it. some heavy loads wont want to go up high enough, so dropping the air bags could help.

Chuck 's Comment
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So glad that this was not worse than it clearly could have been. We talked about this tonight on the phone and I am going to make a mental note to make sure that I do a tug test each time that I am stopped for any length of time or after fueling just to make sure there aren't any problems. Proof that you can never be too careful. Be careful brother and hopefully once I am in Joplin we can meet up finally.

JuiceBox's Comment
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double-quotes-start.png

trucking will humble you.

double-quotes-end.png

(I've got time, and I don't want to "Blue falcon" my fellow driver)

Not sure if everybody knows that term but im guessing they get it lol

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