T.M.C LIED! STAY AWAY FROM XXXX

Topic 22298 | Page 5

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Don's Comment
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Reading Brandon's post here and over on TTR, my comprehension is that his biggest issue was his trainer addressing him as "Boy" all the time. Brandon mentioned that he is a black man. We all know that to address a black man as "boy" will definitely cause some issues. Hence, the comments about "being treated like a man" plus other comments pulled from his posts. It isn't clear if Brandon told the trainer in very clear terms to stop addressing him as "boy" or not. I would hope he had. His other comments relating to the trainers living habits and cleanliness shouldn't be relevant to a trainee, but how well a trainer trains should be, shouldn't it?

G-Town's Comment
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Don, roaches in the truck are not acceptable...health hazard.

Yuuyo Y.'s Comment
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Reading through the OP, I had the same impressions that the OP did, but what Brett and the others said gave me a better perspective. Especially this line.

And you're saying that as the student he made you do most of the driving and do the tarping? My God, he must think that doing the job is the best way to learn the job.

That sounds like a dream come true to me now compared to if you hardly got to do anything and then upgraded to your own truck where you'd have to do exactly the same thing as now but all over again!

Susan D. 's Comment
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Excellent observation Yuuyo. Yep, learn the job while you have the luxury of a one on one mentor to help you become productive and successful, so you aren't struggling so much when you upgrade to solo.

Dave Reid's Comment
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Brandon, training is only a few weeks. We can put up with anything for a few weeks so long as it isn't too dangerous. A few weeks of training and then you have your own ticket. Standing up for something and being proud leaves you unemployed. Sure there are other jobs, but if you want to be a trucker, you have to pay the price of admission.

To all the people attacking me.My question is how long can you handle being called boy and your grown. You should respect people and dude clearly had no respect for himself,the truck or me.Manning up is going home with my dignity and respect.No man should be called out his name regardless periodTreat others the way you wanna be treated.Nobody here is talking about the unprofessional communication aspect.If you know a persons name then call them by that.The 1940s are over and some people still mad about that.We're either one tribe in America or not.Im back home proud I stood for something.Whats right.No man nor woman driver new or old should be addressed like their less.If the money means more to some then fine. Not me.Too many other oppurtunites

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Don's Comment
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G-Town, I agree wholeheartedly about not having roaches in the truck. Gross!

Don, roaches in the truck are not acceptable...health hazard.

Jeremy C.'s Comment
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Brandon, training is only a few weeks. We can put up with anything for a few weeks so long as it isn't too dangerous. A few weeks of training and then you have your own ticket. Standing up for something and being proud leaves you unemployed. Sure there are other jobs, but if you want to be a trucker, you have to pay the price of admission.

^^^ THIS ^^^

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Don's Comment
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What the OP has failed to do in his posts here is to let others know he is a black man. He mentions this over on The tRucker Report. Dave, read again his reply that you quoted. Throughout the thread, he returns to what appears to be his main reason why he is upset. In his one reply alone, his statements include:

""To all the people attacking me.My question is how long can you handle being called boy and your grown" "No man should be called out his name regardless periodTreat others the way you wanna be treated" and "No man nor woman driver new or old should be addressed like their less"

The majority of his statements seem to convey his frustration, as a black man, with being addressed as "Boy" by his trainee. Is making statements such as Standing up for something and being proud leaves you unemployed and if you want to be a trucker, you have to pay the price of admission, imply that he (being a black man) should accept being addressed as "boy." as the "price of admission? Myself, I wouldn't accept being called "Honky", "cracker" "boy" or other derogatory terms by anyone. In this thread, it seems we are giving the trainer all the benefit of the doubt and casting blame on the OP. The OP's comments about T.M.C. and the trainer's appearance doesn't help his cause here, but his frustration on how the trainer addresses him appears, to me at least, to be the main point he is trying to express. His other comments about the trainer's weight, the truck conditions, etc., appear to e secondary.

Brandon, training is only a few weeks. We can put up with anything for a few weeks so long as it isn't too dangerous. A few weeks of training and then you have your own ticket. Standing up for something and being proud leaves you unemployed. Sure there are other jobs, but if you want to be a trucker, you have to pay the price of admission.

double-quotes-start.png

To all the people attacking me.My question is how long can you handle being called boy and your grown. You should respect people and dude clearly had no respect for himself,the truck or me.Manning up is going home with my dignity and respect.No man should be called out his name regardless periodTreat others the way you wanna be treated.Nobody here is talking about the unprofessional communication aspect.If you know a persons name then call them by that.The 1940s are over and some people still mad about that.We're either one tribe in America or not.Im back home proud I stood for something.Whats right.No man nor woman driver new or old should be addressed like their less.If the money means more to some then fine. Not me.Too many other oppurtunites

double-quotes-end.png

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Don's Comment
member avatar

Exactly

I think he meant Yankees a people from the north who weren’t slave states during the civil war. I’m drawing that conclusion because he claimed the trainer was racist.

Jeremy C.'s Comment
member avatar

The majority of his statements seem to convey his frustration, as a black man, with being addressed as "Boy" by his trainee. Is making statements such as Standing up for something and being proud leaves you unemployed and if you want to be a trucker, you have to pay the price of admission, imply that he (being a black man) should accept being addressed as "boy." as the "price of admission? Myself, I wouldn't accept being called "Honky", "cracker" "boy" or other derogatory terms by anyone. In this thread, it seems we are giving the trainer all the benefit of the doubt and casting blame on the OP. The OP's comments about T.M.C. and the trainer's appearance doesn't help his cause here, but his frustration on how the trainer addresses him appears, to me at least, to be the main point he is trying to express. His other comments about the trainer's weight, the truck conditions, etc., appear to e secondary.

Hey, Don, I'm about to respectfully disagree with you... But first wanted to say hello to a fellow buckeye!

Okay, my opinion on the price of admission isn't based on race (just my humble opinion.) I think it exist and I think that price is different for each and every person. Some may have to face racial issues, some may have to face not seeing their children for months on end, some may lose family members while away, etc., etc. My point is, everyone is going to have to deal with something. And name calling seems like one of the pettiest things I can imagine giving up for.

I just don't get it, brother. It sounded like there may (and again I don't know the whole story) but it sounds like it was a whole combination of events that gave him the excuse to do something he wanted to do all along, anyway - quit.

I'm not sticking up for the other guy, eff him if he was at all like he was described. And I don't mean to draw some personal line with you. But I also can't understand how that dude just quit (for any reason.) Much less let words figure into that decision.

Again, great to see someone else from Ohio in here!

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
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