DAC Report? Need Help, Please!

Topic 22436 | Page 1

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Michael N.'s Comment
member avatar

So, I'm a CDL new grad within the last 6 months, I got hired with 2 local companies and they were just not a good fit for me and I finally found a job that I really enjoyed and feel confident doing. I did the road test for the new job and passed and now they are not calling me back. Being a new grad, I did not know anything about a DAC report. I only lasted in the first 2 jobs like a week because I could not bare the overnight hours and the one guy who ran it was a total jerk. Anyway, is their a possibility that the new job found out about these 2 old jobs that only lasted a week? That's ridiculous for me to discriminated against just because they were not a good fit for me. Please help. I did not put these past 2 jobs on my resume because they were so short in length and I felt if I did they would not hire me otherwise. Any advice. I really like this new job I applied to but feel like they found out something in the DAC.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Yes, absolutely.

If you didn't include those two jobs on an employment history as part of your application and/or resume and they found out about them; it's not truthful, non-disclosure is considered a lie.

So three things stand-out; you weren't truthful, lack a stable job history and have a grand total of two weeks experience since receiving your CDL six months ago. Do you honestly believe you are a qualified candidate? Discrimination it's NOT, you are a risk.

Most (not all) trucking companies report start and end dates on a DAC. Keep that in mind on your next application. Be honest.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Michael N.'s Comment
member avatar

Bad work history? I think not. I've held jobs for over 5 years. Just because I'm having a hard time finding a good fit for this industry and being new is not bad to me. I've found a job that fits for me. It's like dating. No difference. I find it absurd that companies frown upon this because they would let you go too if you weren't a good fit. Hence probation periods.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
Bad work history? I think not.

You may not think so, but employers do. You've had two jobs, each of which you quit immediately, in the past 6 months. Then you failed to report either of those jobs on your application to the third job. So you started out with a lie before they even knew you.

Put yourself in the shoes of the people doing the hiring. Why would they bother taking a chance on you? What are the chances you're going to stick around for a while? Pretty much zero it appears.

Come on, man. You should have a basic understanding of how employers see things at this point. You should also understand that any job is going to take a while to get used to, especially when you have no experience in a new and extremely challenging industry. You have to stick it out for a while and pay your dues. You don't even know how to handle a rig yet and you're shopping around for that mythical "perfect job".

confused.gif

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Michael N.'s Comment
member avatar

I never said I was looking for a perfect job. I said one that better suited me. The first two jobs were too physically demanding. They wanted me to unload the trucks. This job I do not have to do any of that so yes that better suited me. Plus one of those jobs were overnight and I could not adjust to the overnights and not being able to sleep during the day which made it very hard to get rest to do the job overnight. I was not going to drive rig on not being able to sleep. This 3rd job is better because it's day time hours and no hard physical labor. It's a better fit for me. That's all I'm trying to say, but I guess I see what the employer sees, but their is always two sides of the coin. They never hear it from the employee.

double-quotes-start.png

Bad work history? I think not.

double-quotes-end.png

You may not think so, but employers do. You've had two jobs, each of which you quit immediately, in the past 6 months. Then you failed to report either of those jobs on your application to the third job. So you started out with a lie before they even knew you.

Put yourself in the shoes of the people doing the hiring. Why would they bother taking a chance on you? What are the chances you're going to stick around for a while? Pretty much zero it appears.

Come on, man. You should have a basic understanding of how employers see things at this point. You should also understand that any job is going to take a while to get used to, especially when you have no experience in a new and extremely challenging industry. You have to stick it out for a while and pay your dues. You don't even know how to handle a rig yet and you're shopping around for that mythical "perfect job".

confused.gif

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar
their is always two sides of the coin. They never hear it from the employee

If you were an employer, given your only jobs in this industry you quit after a week and have had a CDL for 6 months but only worked 2 weeks would you take a chance on You? Honestly answer that....

The amount of money it costs to "onboard " someone is large. Why hire you when someone else may look better on paper? Fact is you tried to hide those 2 jobs because you knew it'd look bad. If you weren't willing to physically unload your truck why did you take that job? If you can't sleep during the day why'd you take that job? Being a truck driver requires you to do what it takes to get the job done. What will you do if this job were to offer you a position and in a couple months say they need to to start working overnights?gonna throw in the towel or find a way to make it happen?

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Old School's Comment
member avatar
They never hear it from the employee.

Oh yes they do.

You opted not to tell them. You learned a lesson that you very well would have been able avoid had you been paying attention to the prolific information available to you here on this site.

You concealed your first two failed attempts at trucking. That was on you, not on them.

Jeremy C.'s Comment
member avatar

...but I guess I see what the employer sees, but their is always two sides of the coin. They never hear it from the employee.

Brother, I'm not trying to pile on (what's been said is pretty straight-forward and accurate.) Right now it sounds like the employer only got to hear one side of the story this time - and it wasn't from the side they should have heard of it from first.

Bottom line: You've made some interesting choices so far, BUT you sound like your trained, licensed, and still have a clean driving record. Reset, recharge, and re-engage!

If this company doesn't have an interest in you, then move on (but first CONFRIM that they do or don't have an interest in you.) And if this opportunity is gone, LEARN FROM THIS EXPERIENCE (no matter who you think is right or wrong), and start looking for the next one.

So far, this is really not an impossible situation. You made some choices and now you have to deal with the outcome of those choices. People have overcome worse odds and worse situations than this. Reset, recharge, and re-engage!

Best of luck!

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Old School's Comment
member avatar

Michael, these are your words from one of your posts several months ago.

I just feel like maybe I'm being lied to and I'm just wasting my time with this whole CDL class.

When you felt like you were being lied to, you determined they were wasting your time. That is precisely how an employer feels.

On your next shot you really should take a little bit of the advice we always give. You've now discovered on your own, what we always teach. Starting out as a local driver is really a tough way to start a trucking career. Commit to an OTR job for one year. That's the medicine you need to kick start your career.

You've done everything you can to avoid heeding our advice, and yet you're always coming back asking for our help. Seems kind of senseless doesn't it?

I remember when you said this to us...

Did not get much help here but thanks

We've tried helping you many times, but you always seem to know better than our many years of combined experience can offer.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Daniel B.'s Comment
member avatar

If you did your research you would know it was driver unload and overnight shifts. The employers do not hide these facts. Your work history is really terrible and the fact that a hiring employer in an industry that is desperate for drivers isn't calling you back should tell you a lot.

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