May I Please Have Some Advice?

Topic 22691 | Page 2

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∆_Danielsahn_∆'s Comment
member avatar

G-Town giving me mixed messages! lol

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We never recommend starting with a company with the intent of moving on after only 3-6 months. It's highly recommended to commit to your first company for at least one year.

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But then:

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Get 6 months of OTR experience then look at tanker.

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Just teasing, you did follow up with

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If you choose a company like Prime or Schneider, you may have the option of moving into a tanker job once you have some experience.

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so its only SORT of confusing! :)

Just wanted to give you a hard time, you do great work around here - keep it up!

Getting 6 months experience is not even the same thought process, and is completely separate from the 1 year commitment. I cannot really comment on this particular topic, though, as I left Swift after 7 months. I was 100% committed to giving them at least a year, but family circumstances, altered my course.

There are those that go straight into tanker, and do well. It is primarily recommended against, for the sole reason, of the added stress, and learning curve, to an already full plate of new experiences, lessons, and challenges.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Danielsahn made a move:

I left Swift after 7 months. I was 100% committed to giving them at least a year, but family circumstances, altered my course.

True - if there's something going on in your life that needs attention, do what you have to do. No problem.

Danielsahn, you do know the refrain "Stay for one year" applies to "Greener Grass" thinking.

Don't drop from your first, or mainly any company just for perceived better benefits. Job hopping on your work history won't help you.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
There are those that go straight into tanker, and do well

There are also people who have survived a jump from an airplane without their shoot opening and "did well" but is it really worth mentioning as a legitimate consideration?

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
∆_Danielsahn_∆'s Comment
member avatar

Danielsahn made a move:

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I left Swift after 7 months. I was 100% committed to giving them at least a year, but family circumstances, altered my course.

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True - if there's something going on in your life that needs attention, do what you have to do. No problem.

Danielsahn, you do know the refrain "Stay for one year" applies to "Greener Grass" thinking.

Don't drop from your first, or mainly any company just for perceived better benefits. Job hopping on your work history won't help you.

Swift actually has better benefits. This move was definitely not a "grass is greener" move. It was a that parallels the direction my family is moving. Is it a great company? Yes, Do I like it here? Definitely. Do I work twice as hard, definitely. I gave Swift every opportunity to work with me, and they tried. But it didn't work out. So I paid my obligation, and moved. I have to mow the grass a lot more, than I did at Swift, but I still wouldn't chang my decision.

There are also people who have survived a jump from an airplane without their shoot opening and "did well" but is it really worth mentioning as a legitimate consideration?

Very true, and good point.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

icecold24k's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

G-Town giving me mixed messages! lol

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

We never recommend starting with a company with the intent of moving on after only 3-6 months. It's highly recommended to commit to your first company for at least one year.

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

But then:

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

Get 6 months of OTR experience then look at tanker.

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

Just teasing, you did follow up with

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

If you choose a company like Prime or Schneider, you may have the option of moving into a tanker job once you have some experience.

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

so its only SORT of confusing! :)

Just wanted to give you a hard time, you do great work around here - keep it up!

double-quotes-end.png

Sorry, didn't mean to confuse. To clarify; move to a tanker job available within the same company.

Yes this absolutely. I did 8 months in the flatbed division at Prime before switching to tankers here. It is a whole different world pulling tanks and even I would advise against it until you have a good winter or so under your belt in another division. I just don't think it is a good idea to jump straight to tanker. Even with the experience I had before moving over to tanker I can honestly say this winter I had a few pucker moments pulling a fully loaded 48000 lb tank. Also we do strictly food grade and to add to the danger factor Schneider does some Hazmat. Just something else to consider.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

I see you have your CDL-A but have no experience? Is your CDL still valid? Did you keep up with your DOT physical and self certification requirements?

If it is still valid, I see you are in Wisconsin and would be in West Side Transport's hiring area. If your CDL is still valid, West Side would probably give you a shot. You'd have to go with a trainer (total orientation, training and test out) would be about 30 days. We do dry van. It's a good solid company to drive for (as are many others).

If your CDL has lapsed (or most carriers will require you to repeat your CDL schooling because it's been too long since you obtained it with no real verifiable experience) I'd highly recommend a larger carrier such as Swift, Prime, or Schneider because they have their own schools and have a huge variety in the opportunities they can offer, such as dry van , refer, flat bed, and tanker.

I'd definitely start out dry van or reefer , then change to a tanker division later after you're a more seasoned driver and sticking with the same company is absolutely in your best interest.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

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