Descending Steep Downgrades In An Automatic

Topic 22715 | Page 3

Page 3 of 4 Previous Page Next Page Go To Page:
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Apparently I’m still learning or my engine’s compression isn’t as strong as in the condos. This learning curve is no joke though!

I go between LWs and full condo; the motor is lighter in the LW, lighter/smaller pistons...less mass available for retarding the momentum of the truck.

Be careful. You'll get it.

Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

No wonder Rainy was on me like white on rice about being overconfident! Thank you all again for all the sage advise.

rofl-3.gifrofl-1.gifrofl-2.gif

I swear people....we really did have fun and laugh a lot! i wasnt all nagging and head drilling!

You are doing great!!!

Splitter's Comment
member avatar

Thanks GTown. It’s difficult to reign myself in when I’m running on recaps & trying to get this load in on time. I know the load is not worth my life or the safety of the driving public around me. Just that I’m in a completely new & challenging industry. It’s causing me to think deeper & further ahead then in my previous comfort zone.

Rainy, we had a blast while I learned as much as humanly possible in a short period of time. As I told you, I do miss being in your capable hands & great company. Give Mr Gata aka Goofball some turkey slices from me. ;)

Villain's Comment
member avatar

Okay, I've looked at this post several times and didn't feel comfortable replying because of my lack of experience. But the comments about taking the descent in auto mode when the weather is good begs the question : if you don't learn how to descend in manual mode in good weather, then what happens in bad weather? Learn on the fly? I always descend in manual mode. It seems that the Descent Mode in my truck is faulty. Tried it twice and the damn thing upshifts like I was on a flat road & wanted to accelerate. I couldn't find the page to provide a link, but these newer transmissions are made to rev above 2k rpm on a descent.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

Cwc's Comment
member avatar

Have you set the speed of your Jake? If I recall correctly they have a menu for it on the extra lever opposite of the turn signal lever. Run through it and you should find an engage speed or target speed or something along those lines. Sorry I can't be more specific but it's been a day or two since I was last in a Volvo.

And yes learn your equipment in good weather and you have plenty of time before the snow flys.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
PlanB's Comment
member avatar

Apparently I’m still learning or my engine’s compression isn’t as strong as in the condos. This learning curve is no joke though!

Yes i think the lightweights have the 12.8 litter and the Condos have the 14.8 liter. The engine brake will be weaker on the smaller motor.

PlanB's Comment
member avatar

Okay, I've looked at this post several times and didn't feel comfortable replying because of my lack of experience. But the comments about taking the descent in auto mode when the weather is good begs the question : if you don't learn how to descend in manual mode in good weather, then what happens in bad weather? Learn on the fly? I always descend in manual mode. It seems that the Descent Mode in my truck is faulty. Tried it twice and the damn thing upshifts like I was on a flat road & wanted to accelerate. I couldn't find the page to provide a link, but these newer transmissions are made to rev above 2k rpm on a descent.

In weather where traction is reduced you reduce speed. Take it slow and steady...

What you described sounds like the decent mode is working as intended. First thing it will do is blip the throttle and upshift, then cut fuel to use the natural resistance of the motor and transmission to slow the truck. As your truck approaches or tries to exceed the speed you set the decent mode at, it will engage engine brake and switch between levels 1-2-3 to prevent the truck from exceeding your set speed. As the hill levels out and you slow down below your set speed it will disengage the engine brake and just coast in gear. It will not give the motor any fuel until you turn hill decent off or press the accelerator yourself.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

PlanB's Comment
member avatar

And just to clarify my truck is a Freightliner Canadia. If your driving something else the system may very well be different.

PlanB's Comment
member avatar

Canadia lol rofl-3.gifrofl-3.gif

Where the edit feature when ya need it.

Freightliner Cascadia. smile.gif

Voyager's Comment
member avatar

This may be alittle late, but i found out that your mechanic can turn on the ACC using a computer. apparently by default it is turned off.

That is one thing I disliked at first, with the International LT, or at least, my LT. The ACC doesn't work for diddly squat with my Jakes. I really got spoiled on my mentor's truck, and then my first Freightliner Lightweight. Now, put it in 8th or 9th, set my Jakes, and then break as needed to maintain speed. Although, I sometimes forget to put it back in auto mode.

Page 3 of 4 Previous Page Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More