Schneider Pre-Work Screen Keeps Me From Driving For Them

Topic 22736 | Page 2

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G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Beating up on Schneider’s orientation helps no one. For me their set up WAS the perfect scenario. I arrived with my CDL in hand and plenty of years of experience in the area of RESPONSIBILITY.

Sorry, but it is a system that works for many. I just think the advice is helpful, and more effective, without the bashing of a company.

I wasn't bashing them.

Read my entire post. Stating that 1 week of driving with a trainer isn't enough before going solo is not bashing. It's my opinion, and nothing will change it.

My point to the OP was everything must be considered.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Tim F.'s Comment
member avatar

I got my permit (spent $200 in PA including the $125 DOT physical PA requires) and had plans to attend school paid for by Schneider starting in 3 weeks. It's the ideal situation: they pay for school and you sign on for only 6 months; paid orientation for 3 weeks; only 1 week with a trainer on the road; regional job with gaurenteed salary of $47,000/yr. Too bad I cannot pull 100lbs or squat 10x in a row due to arthritic knees (I'm almost 56). The recruiter told me I could call a lumper if I didn't think I could unload the trailer. I wonder how that works in the real world. I was soooo excited to be doing this. Totally disappointed.

Does anyone know of a similar paid CDL and training plan out there? I haven't found one. All the paid training programs require at least a 1 year contract and they reimburse you so you have to pay out of pocket to start. There is no pay during training and I need that income. I cannot go without income through school and orientation.

Sorry Phillip...most companies will require you to prove you can physically do the work. With arthritic knees how did you expect to get in and out of the truck? What about sweeping trailers? How will you get inside an empty to sweep it out? If you can’t pull 100 lbs and do 10 squats, maybe this isn’t for you.

Good luck

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Unholychaos's Comment
member avatar

Schneider may only have 1 week road training, but at least the trainer is in the passenger seat the entire time, not sleeping in the bunk while the trainee drives unattended.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Schneider may only have 1 week road training, but at least the trainer is in the passenger seat the entire time, not sleeping in the bunk while the trainee drives unattended.

First 50 hrs of the student driving for Swifts mentoring is the same deal.

Unholychaos's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Schneider may only have 1 week road training, but at least the trainer is in the passenger seat the entire time, not sleeping in the bunk while the trainee drives unattended.

double-quotes-end.png

First 50 hrs of the student driving for Swifts mentoring is the same deal.

So essentially 5 days worth of solo driving then team? Other than the teaming aspect, what does the trainee actually learn from teaming that they can't learn without the trainer there? Legitimate question btw.

∆_Danielsahn_∆'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

Schneider may only have 1 week road training, but at least the trainer is in the passenger seat the entire time, not sleeping in the bunk while the trainee drives unattended.

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

First 50 hrs of the student driving for Swifts mentoring is the same deal.

double-quotes-end.png

So essentially 5 days worth of solo driving then team? Other than the teaming aspect, what does the trainer actually learn from teaming that they can't learn with the trainer there? Legitimate question btw.

Once I was driving team with my mentor, there were a few occasions that I woke him up, for some assistance, in a tight back, pressing the re route button, and following new routing down a truck legal, but not truck safe road, and random other things. Could I have figured things out on my own? Probably, but I had someone there to help, and make things much easier, and a great learning experience, instead of a potential critical event, and a very short career.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
So essentially 5 days worth of solo driving then team? Other than the teaming aspect, what does the trainee actually learn from teaming that they can't learn without the trainer there?

That's quite an odd question coming from an experienced driver. You can't think of any situations that a driver with one week of driving experience might not know how to handle?

Unholychaos's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

So essentially 5 days worth of solo driving then team? Other than the teaming aspect, what does the trainee actually learn from teaming that they can't learn without the trainer there?

double-quotes-end.png

That's quite an odd question coming from an experienced driver. You can't think of any situations that a driver with one week of driving experience might not know how to handle?

My question mainly stems from the teaming while training aspect; that logic just doesn't click for me. I mean yeah you can wake the trainer up if you need help, but wouldn't it make more sense for them to just be awake the whole time?

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
wouldn't it make more sense for them to just be awake the whole time?

Not neccessarily, for a few reasons.

  • Trucking companies are in a fierce battle for economic survival, as are most businesses for that matter. It's extremely expensive to put a highly paid trainer with a paid student and run the truck 2,000 miles per week.
  • In the very beginning the student needs time behind the wheel more than anything. They just need to get comfortable behind the wheel and relax their mind a little bit. They don't need to be in heavy city traffic and snowstorms, but just cruising down the Interstate in light traffic. The trainer doesn't have to be there watching every moment if you're just cruising on the Interstate in light traffic.
  • No one can really relax and focus very well with someone looking over their shoulder critiquing every detail of their existence. It's nice to leave the student alone and let them do their thing when the conditions are pretty mellow.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

Unholychaos's Comment
member avatar

Btw, I'm not knocking team training because it obviously works or else companies wouldn't be doing it. I just personally wouldn't be comfortable in either shoe; being a trainee with minimal road experience while the trainer is asleep and vice versa.

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