Too Smart To Go For My CDL?

Topic 22754 | Page 2

Page 2 of 2 Previous Page Go To Page:
Simon D. (Grandpa)'s Comment
member avatar

Lisa suggests...

double-quotes-start.png

Driving doesn't mean you can't keep thinking. You might explain to your interlocutors that while driving you can listen to books and lectures. You can also have a voice-activated recorder handy and write as you drive. If anything, it's an opportunity to get away from the lure of computers and the distraction of phone calls, and focus on your thoughts. (This assumes, of course, that such activities would be of interest to you.) That time to do nothing but think can produce amazing results. Dr. Kary Mullis, for example, was seeking a way to detect mutations in human genes. Only when he was driving his Honda down a long and winding road in Mendocino County did the idea for PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction) occur to him. In his case, knowledge, a problem to solve, and space to think led to a Nobel Prize. Just sayin'.

double-quotes-end.png

To be honest Lisa, overall your perception of this job is a bit skewed, dangerous. We are not driving little Hondas. I sit at the head-end of a modest size 73' long, 8.5' wide, 13' 6" tall building capable of "pancaking" the Professor's Honda.

Safe and efficient operation definitely requires you to focus on thought...but primarily on driving; understanding the variable real-time situation you are in, managing your space, constantly adjusting, scanning, and always prepared to safely handle the unexpected. Defensive driving on steroids.

I mean seriously...do you honestly believe driving a truck requires no conscience thought?

That it's mindless?

That it's 11 hours of contiguous mental downtime that safely enables total immersion in deep intellectual thought, at a level capable of curing cancer or solving world peace?

Sorry but it's none of the above.

We do much more than babysit these behemoths...figuratively they have a mind of their own, quick tempered and will physically make a collosal mess of things in the blink of an eye. Capable of inflicting unthinkable damage if in the hands of a distracted, unfocused, "intellectually drifting" driver.

There is a time and a place for everything. Listening to books and lectures might be okay to a point, but creating meaningful content using a voice recorder for hours on end? At the intensity level you described? Sorry no, I don't agree with that.

Our primary focus, especially in the first few critical months, must be total concentration on driving. By intent and design, your mind just cannot be on lots of other things... Just sayin'

Perfectly put as ever, G-town. 👍

I just wish I could get somebody sitting not too far from me to think this way!! 😜

The struggle is real........and continues!!

Lol

Zengrump's Comment
member avatar

I just went through this very recently. Most of the people in my life were very supportive of the change, but there were a few with their nose in the clouds that felt differently. Nothing said could change their minds. Hopefully, over the course of time, they will see that the move was positive from my continued improved disposition and patience. To those that won't let it go I generally say: I did the corporate thing a long time and it was time for a change; this is something I just want to try; and my degrees are always there for me if it doesn't work out. That usually will get them off my back (not without the occasional disapproving look though). This career is unconventional, and moving away from their comfort zones. We're no longer part of the world in which they've known us for so long and extra effort may be needed to keep those relationships from drifting away (Brett might have talked in one of his podcasts about this type of thing(?) but I'm having a hard time remembering (after 6 weeks of orientation, cdl school and securement training my mind is a little mushy)). Regardless, the sayings about making everyone happy and opinions will always be true. You may need to do a little ignoring for a while because if there is one thing I learned over the last 6 weeks mentioned above, if you want to make this work you'll need to stay focused and positive. Good luck!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

I was 41. My mother and i argued over it. I won.

I was a high school AP honors student, a college honors grad, a Lieutenant Governor for an international community service organization during which I had lunch with POTUS, and i was given an award by the Post Master General of the US while working at the USPS for 18 years. I have written and published six books, 5 audiobooks (on audible.com), and co founded a very successful online magazine. I toured a large part of the country with my books and have sold books in most of the Barnes n Nobles and Amazon markets including: UK, Austrailia, Canada, India, Germany, Spain, France, Italy and Japan. Three different people offered me.large sums of.money for the movie rights of one of my novels. i have traveled the world....swam with dolphins, snorkeled with sea lions, played with a tiger, bungee jumped over the Grand Canyon, parasailed, walked on glaciers, and so much more. I spent weeks caring for victims of hurricane Katrina, saved someones life via CPR, attacked a mugger, and tackled a possible terrorist in an airport. I also faught off two armed assailants. I ordered and loved my dream car, a Mustang GT...of which i have owned 3.

After all that... .I became a truck driver.

I wish i had the time to continue writing my novels, but i am not afforded such.

My point....never let anyone or anything stop you from doing whatever you want. LIVE your life.

My mother always tells me of bungee cords being cut or people dying in adventurous ways. I told her "do no feel bad if i die in a tropical paradise doing something i enjoy...while most people cant afford to do so, or have responsibilities that prevent them. Just remember that i lived my life to the fullest."

Dustan J.'s Comment
member avatar

People have this crazy notion that your degree is equivalent to your personality, desires, sense of adventure, etc. Not only that, a pathological need to shove their opinions onto other people seem to accompany that. You are responsible for you own happiness, so go with what you believe is best for you. If you're a single guy or otherwise not obligated to much financial responsibility then trucking can be a great way to pay off loans and set yourself up for success. I find it hilarious that someone would tell another person how to live their life, as though they are absolutely sure. A young person stands to gain a lot of knowledge and life experience pretty quickly from trucking, much like a reasonable stint in the military or something that gets you out and about in the world meeting interesting people and seeing things you could not otherwise experience from a humdrum life in the same workplace day in and day out, just a steady drone of monotony like a lawn mower outside your window at the crack of dawn on your only day off in months.

Dustan J.'s Comment
member avatar

Lisa suggests...

double-quotes-start.png

Driving doesn't mean you can't keep thinking. You might explain to your interlocutors that while driving you can listen to books and lectures. You can also have a voice-activated recorder handy and write as you drive. If anything, it's an opportunity to get away from the lure of computers and the distraction of phone calls, and focus on your thoughts. (This assumes, of course, that such activities would be of interest to you.) That time to do nothing but think can produce amazing results. Dr. Kary Mullis, for example, was seeking a way to detect mutations in human genes. Only when he was driving his Honda down a long and winding road in Mendocino County did the idea for PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction) occur to him. In his case, knowledge, a problem to solve, and space to think led to a Nobel Prize. Just sayin'.

double-quotes-end.png

To be honest Lisa, overall your perception of this job is a bit skewed, dangerous. We are not driving little Hondas. I sit at the head-end of a modest size 73' long, 8.5' wide, 13' 6" tall building capable of "pancaking" the Professor's Honda.

Safe and efficient operation definitely requires you to focus on thought...but primarily on driving; understanding the variable real-time situation you are in, managing your space, constantly adjusting, scanning, and always prepared to safely handle the unexpected. Defensive driving on steroids.

I mean seriously...do you honestly believe driving a truck requires no conscience thought?

That it's mindless?

That it's 11 hours of contiguous mental downtime that safely enables total immersion in deep intellectual thought, at a level capable of curing cancer or solving world peace?

Sorry but it's none of the above.

We do much more than babysit these behemoths...figuratively they have a mind of their own, quick tempered and will physically make a collosal mess of things in the blink of an eye. Capable of inflicting unthinkable damage if in the hands of a distracted, unfocused, "intellectually drifting" driver.

There is a time and a place for everything. Listening to books and lectures might be okay to a point, but creating meaningful content using a voice recorder for hours on end? At the intensity level you described? Sorry no, I don't agree with that.

Our primary focus, especially in the first few critical months, must be total concentration on driving. By intent and design, your mind just cannot be on lots of other things... Just sayin'

I agree with this response. I'd like to think that a lot of us have pulled over for a cat nap or a stretch of the legs to get the brain back on track.

Page 2 of 2 Previous Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More