Prime CDL Training

Topic 22982 | Page 25

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Splitter's Comment
member avatar

Take your time Kim. Use the reference points. That’s the key. The reference points for me were the middle of the “V” of the landing gear & turning the steering wheel 1.5 revolutions. Also, make sure you stop when transitioning to either side. Other drivers use the legs of the landing gear with full revolutions of the steering wheel.

Another thing is to what the trajectory of the wheels more so that the actual trailer. You’ll definitely get it. Remember to breathe, GOAL, watch the set up points too. It’s crucial to set up properly. That’ll determine whether or not the rest of the maneuver will fall into place.

Lastly , if you can get a toy truck, that’ll help you visualize how the trailer reacts to different inputs from you. And before you start each maneuver, stop & point in the direction you want to go then turn the wheel in the opposite direction. It’s another great way to visualize where you want to guide the trailer.

Oh snap! Almost forgot. Make small corrections. Don’t oversteer. Someone called it making baby steps. They’re easier to rein back in if you see you are off your trajectory.

Keep your head up! You’re nearly there!!

Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

And heres a tip... if you get to the point where you fail backing twice and are afraid of the "do or die" factor, ask for additional help. there are local trainers there like Dave, Anthony, Brett, and others that will get you through it. they might be able to explain it im a different way. hang in there

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

Kim T.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks guys! We went back to the pad tonight and...I did two driver’s side offsets and two blind side offsets!!! Then, when we were done with that she told me to park and unhook the trailer. And I did it! I feel a lot better about tonight’s session than I did this afternoon’s. I thought about what you all said, took a deep breath before each maneuver, calmed down, and just backed it in the hole. Was it perfect? No. Was it pretty? No. Did I lose track of my trailer and have to pull up to reposition? Yes. But I did it. I got out and looked, figured out what I needed to do, and worked towards that. Tomorrow we are going to do more offsets and then throw in parallels and alley dock.

Thanks again everyone! Now it’s time to pass out.

Signed, One tired but happy girl.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Congratulations Kim!

You are now experiencing Emotional Roller Coaster Of Truck Driver Training.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Kim T.'s Comment
member avatar

Thank you Old School.

I just got back from the pad again and we worked on parallels and did some more offsets. On offsets I do much better on the blindside offset than I do driver’s side. On parallels I do just the opposite. It’s weird. We are going back tonight and work some more. My trainer is also going to evaluate me on the full pre-trip. Fingers crossed!

Kim T.'s Comment
member avatar

I almost called David, my son, on Tuesday and had him come to Missouri to pick me up. I’d had it. I was mentally and physically exhausted. I was trying to learn alley dock and it was not working no matter what I did. I met with my trainer Wednesday morning and told I her I needed a day off and why. She said she was exhausted too so we took off. We met back at the pad yesterday morning and I did the alley dock six times and the offsets and parallels several times each! It’s amazing what rest and sleep can to do. We are going back to the pad this morning for a little more practice and...I am scheduled to test out on Saturday morning. 😜 I think I’ve got this though.

So please, keep the good mojo coming this way. 😁

Old School's Comment
member avatar
I almost called David, my son, on Tuesday and had him come to Missouri to pick me up. I’d had it. I was mentally and physically exhausted.

Thanks for posting this Kim.

This is something we try to warn people about all the time. The frustration and exhaustion of the training period is a deal breaker for so many, but it's only a temporary situation. You did the right thing - you took a day off and got yourself focused - that was just what you needed.

Hang in there. You'll have days and nights that are super challenging. How you respond to the challenges will begin to shape you as a driver. So far, I'm seeing a decent future for you in this career. Keep up the great work you're doing. I can assure you that after a couple of years into this you are either going to really be enjoying it and reaping the rewards, or you will be able to quit with your head held high and filled with a vast array of great stories to share with your friends of your "time on the road."

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Like Old School said, we're always trying to warn people about the emotional rollercoaster that trucking is, especially in the beginning. Almost everyone wants to quit several times in those first few months. You can expect it.

Every year many thousands of people drop out of trucking, many of them before they even make it to solo status, because of the exhaustion, frustration, and homesickness they experience in the beginning. Most of these people would have gone on to be very good drivers, but their careers ended quickly because they simply didn't have the determination to see it through.

Trucking is such a gratifying career because of the endless stream of challenges you'll face out there. It will get easier, but trucking never gets easy. You have to embrace the challenges and always keep counting your blessings. It's an incredible privilege in my book to have the opportunity to drive these big, beautiful rigs across the country and make such a good living doing it.

Finally, do not allow yourself to entertain negative self-talk. There is no quitting. There is no crying about it. Yes, it's tough, but it's not that tough. If millions of people have done this before you then you certainly have what it takes to do this, right? Of course. So don't quit on yourself and don't accept anything less than success. Keep your thinking positive at all times and be thankful for the opportunity you have. It makes all the difference in the world.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Brian's Comment
member avatar

Just remember that when you eventually go solo. All that will matter is that you did it in a safe manner. What I mean is I'm not world's ahead of you in terms of experience. I deliver alot in Chicago, and have stops I have to goal half a dozen times sometimes. When I get back for the day to turn in copies of invoices no one is asking how many pull ups you do at this stop. Or what took you so long to back in. The only care is that you didn't hit anything.

Also you're with a trainer still and chances are she is making you nervous and you are also trying to impress her. I was the same way and when I was by myself and somewhat able to relax alittle things came along alittle easier. So hang in there. This is all normal.

Splitter's Comment
member avatar

I almost called David, my son, on Tuesday and had him come to Missouri to pick me up. I’d had it. I was mentally and physically exhausted. I was trying to learn alley dock and it was not working no matter what I did. I met with my trainer Wednesday morning and told I her I needed a day off and why. She said she was exhausted too so we took off. We met back at the pad yesterday morning and I did the alley dock six times and the offsets and parallels several times each! It’s amazing what rest and sleep can to do. We are going back to the pad this morning for a little more practice and...I am scheduled to test out on Saturday morning. 😜 I think I’ve got this though.

So please, keep the good mojo coming this way. 😁

Kim, imagine how I felt after failing my backing twice. Then failing my road test twice again. My head was all over the place. I wanted to test out in an auto & take the restriction on my license. That was impossible cause Rainy had been waiting for over a week for me to go on her truck which was a manual. Talk about make or break? Luckily for me I passed, got my cdl & the rest is history. Keep your head up & take your time. Rooting for ya!! good-luck.gif

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

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