Back Pain And Coffee Pots

Topic 23018 | Page 1

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Chris W.'s Comment
member avatar

Hey guys, I’m Chris. I’ll be starting with PTL in about 3 weeks. I’m a greenhorn, just got my CDL and am looking forward to joining the ranks with all of you. My question is this, I have lower back pain and wonder if any of you have any advice on how to deal with it OTR? And coffee pots. I’ve also been reading all over this site about the sleep pattern of the OTRs and wonder if there is a way to keep a working coffee pot in my truck so that when I have the 4 hour waits for loading/unloading or 4 hours of actual sleep time and I’m not able to wake up in a Pilot parking lot, I have some good strong coffee.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

My advice on the back pain is adjust your seat properly; not too high, so you are not reaching for the wheel and can comfortably drive with your shoulders “in the seat.” Might take some trial and error, the seats have an infinite amount of possible positions.

I’d invest in a DC powered, single-cup Keurig so you can quickly make a cup when you need it.

Cwc's Comment
member avatar

If you have an inverter you can get a 120 volt water boiler and an aeropress or French press if you want to go coffee geek. If you go the aeropress route press it twice.. And check out Black Rifle Coffee company if you don't already know about them. And if you just want good entertainment.. Check out the Blackrifle coffee company YouTube videos.

Coffee... it gets you going.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

Cold War Surplus's Comment
member avatar

... wonder if there is a way to keep a working coffee pot in my truck so that when I have the 4 hour waits for loading/unloading or 4 hours of actual sleep time and I’m not able to wake up in a Pilot parking lot, I have some good strong coffee.

You're asking the wrong question. Brewing your own creates a logistics issue because you'll need to stockpile coffee and water. If you're running hard, particularly in a part of the country you're not familiar with it can be challenging to find a grocery store that's open, welcomes trucks and has a parking area that isn't full of 4-wheelers and other truck obstacles. Over time you'll have a mental list of truck stops that are close to grocery stores (Oak Creek, WI; Lincoln, IL; Kearney, MO; Springville, UT and Ripon, CA is my short-list). Even with my long list I have gone weeks with an empty fridge because of operating tempo, trainee needs and freight volumes. Yeah, you can buy water and coffee at truck stops but quantities are small and prices are high.

On the other hand, you're rarely away from a truck stop for more than 24 hours. If you're a diamond member at Loves' (buy 1,500 gallons of diesel there in a month), coffee refills are FREE. Worst case you can usually fill a 68 oz thermos for <$2, or about half of what a gallon of water sells for at the same truck stop. A modern, vacuum-insulated thermos can keep your coffee HOT for up to 24 hours! I use this:

www.amazon.com/gp/product/B008YB4V52

Cwc's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

... wonder if there is a way to keep a working coffee pot in my truck so that when I have the 4 hour waits for loading/unloading or 4 hours of actual sleep time and I’m not able to wake up in a Pilot parking lot, I have some good strong coffee.

double-quotes-end.png

You're asking the wrong question. Brewing your own creates a logistics issue because you'll need to stockpile coffee and water. If you're running hard, particularly in a part of the country you're not familiar with it can be challenging to find a grocery store that's open, welcomes trucks and has a parking area that isn't full of 4-wheelers and other truck obstacles. Over time you'll have a mental list of truck stops that are close to grocery stores (Oak Creek, WI; Lincoln, IL; Kearney, MO; Springville, UT and Ripon, CA is my short-list). Even with my long list I have gone weeks with an empty fridge because of operating tempo, trainee needs and freight volumes. Yeah, you can buy water and coffee at truck stops but quantities are small and prices are high.

On the other hand, you're rarely away from a truck stop for more than 24 hours. If you're a diamond member at Loves' (buy 1,500 gallons of diesel there in a month), coffee refills are FREE. Worst case you can usually fill a 68 oz thermos for <$2, or about half of what a gallon of water sells for at the same truck stop. A modern, vacuum-insulated thermos can keep your coffee HOT for up to 24 hours! I use this:

www.amazon.com/gp/product/B008YB4V52

He makes a good argument. And I'll admit that I'm a 1 maybe 2 cup person and that's right before I lift weights... so if your a pot a day drinker take what I say as you will.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Dave Reid's Comment
member avatar

Chris, you've got to get that lower back pain under control before you get into this line of work. Hopefully, you've learned various exercises that you can do, and how to handle yourself so that you don't aggravate it? If not, please take the time to get a little help with that from a professional, or figure it out from the body of information available online. Once you start driving, find that correct seating position as G-Town mentioned, plus move around frequently as you drive. If the truck seat doesn't give you enough support, invest in a back pad that works for you. I had a $300 back cushion in the Cascadia I was driving, but my new truck has an outstanding seat so I no longer need that. Finally, once you get your truck assigned, put a couple of cold paks in the freezer so you have them if you have a flare-up. If someone tries to give you a heating pad, put that in the trash.

About that coffee pot - various opinions abound on that. Lots of drivers won't go anywhere without their favorite coffee maker, and I understand that desire. However, I have found that the similar one can keep it the better. Personally, I don't want any extra work to do when my work day is done, and I sure don't want any clean-up. So, my solution is this. Usually I park at a PFJ and get a coffee there before I hit the road. If I want another cup I either stop for it or more likely I grap one of my alternatives out of my cooler I keep by my side. I also use an alternative if I park at a rest area or customer or some other place I can't buy coffee. What alternatives do I carry? A selection: 5 Hour Energy, Starbucks Double Espresso (cans), and some various cans of cold brew. With this approach, I have no cleanup, no additional appliance to deal with, and maintaining my inventory is easy - I just stock up when the opportunity presents to hit a store.

Hey guys, I’m Chris. I’ll be starting with PTL in about 3 weeks. I’m a greenhorn, just got my CDL and am looking forward to joining the ranks with all of you. My question is this, I have lower back pain and wonder if any of you have any advice on how to deal with it OTR? And coffee pots. I’ve also been reading all over this site about the sleep pattern of the OTRs and wonder if there is a way to keep a working coffee pot in my truck so that when I have the 4 hour waits for loading/unloading or 4 hours of actual sleep time and I’m not able to wake up in a Pilot parking lot, I have some good strong coffee.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Deb R.'s Comment
member avatar

Best thing to do for your back is to keep your core muscles strong - i.e. situps for lower back, and get out of the truck, walk around and stretch.

Coffee! The stuff of life! A good cup of coffee is priority for me, therefore, the truck stop stuff = yuck. Also, I am often at a customer or rest area where the only option is to make my own. I have an inverter. I use a small, single serving size drip coffee maker. No pot, it goes directly into my mug. Uses size #2 (the little ones) filter. Put a scoop of good ground coffee in, a cup of water, and my mug gets filled up with awesomeness. Cheaper to use than the Keurig-type and I don't have to get special pods. The used grounds are no big deal, I just throw the little filter with the grounds into my trash bag. It helps to have a napkin handy to catch drips. My coffee maker has a mesh filter that TECHNICALLY means you don't have to use a paper filter, but I tried that once, and dealing with the used grounds was a mess. Use a paper filter! As for water, I always have multiple gallons on board. I am a little phobic about running out of water. I buy gallon jugs, and keep refilling them until the plastic gets brittle, then replace. You can fill up jugs at many rest areas.

Diver Driver's Comment
member avatar

Everone else has covered the back issue. As for a coffee pot.... if you have an inverter, get a cheap 5 cup MR. Coffee. It works perfect, and a single bottle of water makes enough to fill a philmore cup from Pilot. STAY AWAY from the fancy digital, programable coffee pots. The don't last in the truck.

If you don't have the inverter, go with a 12v. Water heater. Starbucks makes a few different varieties of instant coffee that will get you going in the morning.

Marc Lee's Comment
member avatar

I vote Aeropress if you are willing to invest just a bit more time and effort. I fill mine to almost 3 of 4 level. Tamp it down firmly, add water and "stir" with a butter knife -(first pressing knife up and down to get water into grounds, and then stiring to fully mix water and grounds). I add water to top off several times. One press equals almost 4 almost espresso shots!

As water should be about 195F I boil water (microwave or Presto pot), I first pour it into my SS travel mug, then a Pyrex type measuring vessel. This preheats mug and drops temp appropriately. 100% natural vanilla bean ice cream (microwaved) and I am good to go! Have not taken this show on the road with 18 wheels... but I sure hope and plan too!

We can talk grinding in another exchange!

If you have an inverter you can get a 120 volt water boiler and an aeropress or French press if you want to go coffee geek. If you go the aeropress route press it twice.. And check out Black Rifle Coffee company if you don't already know about them. And if you just want good entertainment.. Check out the Blackrifle coffee company YouTube videos.

Coffee... it gets you going.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

Grumpy Old Man's Comment
member avatar

Search Amazon for travel Keurig. There are a few listed, Keurig has one but it is fairly expensive, Hamilton Beach Flexbrew looks decent at a reasonable price.

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