Question About Employment History

Topic 23553 | Page 1

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Jim B.'s Comment
member avatar

Please bear with me here, I'm new to this site.

Ok, so after years of considering becoming a truck driver and years of NOT doing it for various reasons, both logical and some, well...not so much, I have finally decided to grow a pair and commit to a career. Not a career CHANGE, but a career. Finally. After 20+ years of working in Corrections, Education, Manufacturing and Telecommunications, I am diving right in.

I have two concerns with my driving record: 1) I had a suspension probably 10 years ago for a "wake in a no-wake zone" ticket I received while on a 15ft, 8hp fishing boat. That's a whole 'nother story, 'cause I was almost capsized by the Police boat and its 2-250hp outboards. Was not ticketed at the time and never received one in the mail. Once I discovered the suspension, I immediately paid the ticket and all fees/fines to get my license reinstated. No moving violations (in a motor vehicle) since 2003-ish. 2) I was ticketed probably 4-5 years ago for expired tags. Question: Will these events count against me?

My main concern, however, is how my employment history over the last year or so might affect my career prospects. The completely true story goes like this: I suffered a work-related injury that involved falling out of my work van on a rainy day and hurting my back. Company sent me to the doctor, doctor said I had to take a couple weeks off work and physical therapy was required. Company filed Worker's Compensation claim. To make a VERY long story short, I ended up on WC for more than 2 years, with more than well over a year between my final doctor appt and the final settlement. So, no taxes filed for 2016 or 2017. I took what would be considered a "voluntary" termination--rather than just quitting--because, while my back is fine 90% of all activities, I just wasn't sure I could handle crawling under houses, hauling a 28ft extension ladder on/off a van, or doing line work at the top of said 28ft extension ladder. I just wasn't sure my back could handle that and I didn't want to risk going back to work and getting hurt again. I didn't quit, or stop showing up for work, or anything of that sort. I got hurt and followed the company's policies and procedures. That "voluntary" termination was back in April 2018.

Now, this is where it gets a little dicey, at least in my opinion: back in December 2017, just a few days before Christmas, my roommate got sick and nearly died. I spent a month by her bed in the hospital while the ran test after test after test...and while they also tried to fix the damage the did to her kidneys. Anyways, that's another story. So, after the month long hospital stay, I took her to my mom's in WI to get away and relax and recover. Stayed in WI taking care of her, as well as helping my mother, who needs a hip replacement but can't get it because she's having trouble controlling her diabetes. To add to the fun, my brother, who was staying with my mom, was diagnosed with colon cancer and had to have a couple of surgeries and started on Chemo and radiation while I was up there caring for my still-very-sick roommate. So, fast forward to April, when we came back to SC. My roommate was still sick and was developing various other problems to go along with her already major issues. Now mind you, I was 100% responsible for her care: she could barely walk, slept about 2 hours a night, couldn't eat, was on like 20 different medications for which I paid, was going to different doctors 2-3 times per week, etc. So, I took care of her as best I could until money started running out. Got a job mid-May making less per week than I had been getting on WC, but... Because I had spent so many months taking care of my roommate, helping my mother and my brother, I was burnt-out. The problem with this is that I didn't realize it until I went back to work and started having problems with my own health. No problems with my back what-so-ever; just...other things. Add to that I wasn't sleeping well because I was still caring for my roommate full-time. I missed several days of work due to her pre-scheduled Dr appointments--most of which were scheduled 2-3 months in advance--as well as new appointments and rescheduled appointments, that even though I had notified this new job of the appointments when I started and was assured it was OK, I was terminated for "excessive absences". That was in July. July 13. Friday, July 13. Ironic, huh? I did get a letter of recommendation from the HR lady who fired me, though I can't find it now. Of course.

Since my roommate was only marginally better at this time, and still relied on me for 90-95% of daily doings, and since I no longer had a job, I packed up her and the car and went back to WI to help my mom again, as my brother was getting his butt kicked by the chemo and radiation and couldn't help her as much as she needed. Stayed for about a month until my brother was feeling somewhat better, then came back to SC to start a new job, only to be told that my start date was pushed back a week, then another week, then another week...At this point, I'm out of money, out of work and sleeping on my dad's couch. My roommate is no longer with me; that is a topic I have no desire to discuss here.

I provided all this info not for pity or praise, but for a simple question: Will the past several months negatively impact my employability with regard to Paid CDL Training? Any thoughts or opinions are appreciated.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Turtle's Comment
member avatar

The short answer is yes your work history will affect your employment chances at some companies, but not all. Someone will take a chance on you. It'll be on you to prove your worth after that.

Truck Driver's Career GuideApply For Paid CDL Training

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
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