How Did You Learn To Drive

Topic 23777 | Page 3

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Joe G.'s Comment
member avatar

Well, before I created my account I did have a chance to read a few forum posts on here. It seems that the consensus is that there'll always be people who complain because of not putting in effort and I was actually leaning towards Prime, Inc. to be completely honest.

My concern is that TruckingTruth might be promoting these company sponsored training(s) for a profit and thus be biased.

I know that this industry chews up people who are not well prepared and sitting in a classroom for weeks definitely doesn't prepare you like actually working while training.

About my comment about "degree mill": I was referring to C.R. England based on several reviews on Google Maps.

Company Sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
My concern is that TruckingTruth might be promoting these company sponsored training(s) for a profit and thus be biased.

Totally understandable concern.

The first thing I would say is to read through the logic in our articles and forum conversations and see if you think it makes sense. There are very simple, logical reasons why the paid programs that the companies offer are better than private schooling and we spell them out really well. Not only in the links I gave in my previous comment, but in this article I wrote here:

Why I Prefer Paid CDL Training Over Private CDL Training

Read through that and see if you think it makes sense.

About my comment about "degree mill": I was referring to C.R. England based on several reviews on Google Maps.

One thing I always try to help people understand is that you should never take career advice from complainers. When you want to figure out how to become successful at something, seek out those who have had tremendous success and have a passion for what they do and learn from them. You're not going to find happiness and success by following the advice of people who couldn't find it themselves.

There are a ton of people who take a shot at trucking that either can't handle it or never do figure it out. When they fail to achieve anything worthwhile they immediately look to place blame on others.

Let me tell ya something - people who know how to become successful at anything they want to do will always take 100% of the responsibility for the outcome of their endeavors. People who point fingers and place blame are failures. It's as simple as that. They've failed to achieve what they wanted to and then they've failed to take responsibility for the outcome of their endeavors. Those are not the people you want to take advice from.

Here is a podcast I did on that:

Episode 19: You're Getting Career Advice From The Wrong People

Here at Trucking Truth you're going to find a ton of highly experienced professional drivers who have succeeded at the highest level and absolutely love what they do. Those are the people you want to learn from. Not only will you learn what they did to achieve that level of happiness and success, but you'll learn about the mistakes they've made and the mistakes they've watched others make that prevented them from achieving the same.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Company Sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Big Scott (CFI Driver/Tra's Comment
member avatar

I get ZERO from CFI for bringing in students. If I bring an experienced driver I would make money. I promote CFI here because I love the company and money. I went through their Paid CDL Training Program. I found them through a friend and he didn't know they offered training. I don't get paid from Brett. I just want to help others be successful. This site helped me prepare for this career/lifestyle. We have active contributers who work for different companies. We all love our companies.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Joe we all volunteer our time here for the enjoyment of helping others, support of the brotherhood/sisterhood we have in the forum, and the love of the industry we all want populated with safe and efficient drivers.

I’ve never used this forum as a platform for recruiting, never will. As far as your comment about Company Sponsored? I graduated from Swift’s Academy long before I knew this website existed. Regardless it’s STILL the best way to go.

Grumpy Old Man's Comment
member avatar

Well, before I created my account I did have a chance to read a few forum posts on here. It seems that the consensus is that there'll always be people who complain because of not putting in effort and I was actually leaning towards Prime, Inc. to be completely honest.

My concern is that TruckingTruth might be promoting these company sponsored training(s) for a profit and thus be biased.

I know that this industry chews up people who are not well prepared and sitting in a classroom for weeks definitely doesn't prepare you like actually working while training.

About my comment about "degree mill": I was referring to C.R. England based on several reviews on Google Maps.

I start school Monday at Sage, which is said to be an excellent school. Driving time (144 hours) is all one on one with an instructor, with no one else in the truck.

I am not a driver yet, so no referral bonus even if you were experienced. I am not a moderator here, just another guy using the forum to gain knowledge, so I am definitely not being paid in any way. In fact, I'll give you my best advice, if you take it, great, if not, great, not my problem, and if it turns to crap for you later, I'll be right in line to say told you so. Yep, I can be a jerk. All that to say, I'm giving you my honest opinion as someone paying for their own schooling, and the reason I give that advice.

First, why I am paying for private school. Simple, the company I wanted to work for (H.O. Wolding), because of route, reputation, and home time, does not offer a company school. I called them for a pre-hire letter, and was very upfront with them that I wanted to work for them for the reasons above. I told them that if working for them wasn't an option that I would be silly to pay for my own school, and they agreed.

I am going to school for 2 weeks, leaving for 2, then returning for driving practice and DMV road test. Why? Because this awesome school is SO disorganized, they never scheduled my road test, so now they can't get me a road test until late December, and I have already closed my business, reserved a room, and need to start now. Everything about this place says they have their head up their arse.

I was just discussing this today with my wife. I question exactly what I am going to do in school for 2 weeks. Watch videos? Learn to fill out paper logs? Frankly, I think the 2 weeks may be to justify their high tuition. I don't have to take a written test, so most of the school is probably a waste of time, though I could be wrong, time will tell.

Why would I choose a company school?

First, if they put time and money into training you, they have much more reason to work hard to get you on the road to recoup their investment. Business 101. Second, they will train you in exactly what you need to be successful, because this job is just like sales, if you make money, they make money. Again, Business 101.

As far as having to sign a contract, it's only fair that they get a return on their investment, and most, if not all, spell out upfront what you need to pay if you decide working for them is not for you. And another company would likely repay your tuition in that event. I have even heard of companies buying out the contract. However, I would highly recommend staying at least a year with your starter company. Until you have that year of experience, you really don't know what you don't know, as they say, and with a year of experience, you can get a job most anywhere, as long as your record is clean.

I just don't see a downside to using a company school. Had Wolding shown no interest, I would have applied at Maverick, Roehl, TMC, Veriha, Prime, etc. I probably would have just used the link here that applies to all of them, and manually applied to any of the above not on that list. Then I would pick who wanted me that had routes, pay (during training and after), and home time that I liked.

As far as signing a contract, I will have to stay at Wolding for 30 months to repay my tuition at $200/month, and I have seen at least a couple of companies who repay tuition for private school IF you start with them right out of school, so in effect, I have a 30 month contract with Wolding. Which is fine, as long as they hold up their end of the deal, I see no reason to go anywhere else.

That is my take on why company school over private. Always use other people's money if you can.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

Pre-hire:

What Exactly Is A Pre-Hire Letter?

Pre-hire letters are acceptance letters from trucking companies to students, or even potential students, to verify placement. The trucking companies are saying in writing that the student, or potential student, appears to meet the company's minimum hiring requirements and is welcome to attend their orientation at the company’s expense once he or she graduates from truck driving school and has their CDL in hand.

We have an excellent article that will help you Understand The Pre-Hire Process.

A Pre-Hire Letter Is Not A Guarantee Of Employment

The people that receive a pre-hire letter are people who meet the company's minimum hiring requirements, but it is not an employment contract. It is an invitation to orientation, and the orientation itself is a prerequisite to employment.

During the orientation you will get a physical, drug screen, and background check done. These and other qualifications must be met before someone in orientation is officially hired.

Company Sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

Grumpy Old Man's Comment
member avatar

By the way, that expensive school will teach you to get your CDL , and give you a certificate that you have driven 150 hours or so. Period.

You will still have to go to a company school for orientation and your REAL training, so why not let the company foot the bill, house you, feed you, etc.? Most even pay you something during training.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
Driving time (144 hours) is all one on one with an instructor, with no one else in the truck.

Their website says:

The program consists of 150 hours of instruction (44 one-student-per-truck driving hours) conducted over 4-5 weeks.

You should probably make sure you don't accidentally exaggerate the driving time by maybe 100 hours.

smile.gif

Grumpy Old Man's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Driving time (144 hours) is all one on one with an instructor, with no one else in the truck.

double-quotes-end.png

Their website says:

double-quotes-start.png

The program consists of 150 hours of instruction (44 one-student-per-truck driving hours) conducted over 4-5 weeks.

double-quotes-end.png

You should probably make sure you don't accidentally exaggerate the driving time by maybe 100 hours.

smile.gif

Sorry, you are correct, the course is 144 hours, 44 hours of that is driving. 11 drives, 4 hours long.

Grumpy Old Man's Comment
member avatar

By the way, that expensive school will teach you to get your CDL , and give you a certificate that you have driven 150 hours or so. Period.

You will still have to go to a company school for orientation and your REAL training, so why not let the company foot the bill, house you, feed you, etc.? Most even pay you something during training.

This should be 50 hours or so as well.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
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