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G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Be 100% honest with your current employer. Put all of the cards on the table.

You’ll never know how they will support your return to duty if you apply deceitful tactics and assume their lack of compromise.

Grumpy Old Man's Comment
member avatar

Be 100% honest with your current employer. Put all of the cards on the table.

You’ll never know how they will support your return to duty if you apply deceitful tactics and assume their lack of compromise.

He isn't planning to return, that's the problem. He plans to quit while out recovering.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Be 100% honest with your current employer. Put all of the cards on the table.

You’ll never know how they will support your return to duty if you apply deceitful tactics and assume their lack of compromise.

double-quotes-end.png

He isn't planning to return, that's the problem. He plans to quit while out recovering.

I know that.

double-quotes-start.png

Be 100% honest with your current employer. Put all of the cards on the table.

You’ll never know how they will support your return to duty if you apply deceitful tactics and assume their lack of compromise.

double-quotes-end.png

He isn't planning to return, that's the problem. He plans to quit while out recovering.

I understand that. The problem is how he is going about it with his current company. It’s not on the up-and-up, thus he has no clarity in the consequences.

We also have no idea why he wants to leave the current employer. It’s relevant in terms of assessing the probility of success with the new job.

Although I don’t know the whole story, I’d wait to leave the current employer (if it’s a must), recover medically with them, get back into their truck drive a bit and then execute on the other offer.

Call me old fashioned, his planned approach is the wrong way to go about this.

Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

In the system they label each driver return to duty status as "can rehire" "refuse to rehire" etc.

so if a future employer checks, he will could be a "do not rehire" and given a bad reference.

why not just get the surgery go back and in a few months change companies?

what if you have complications from surgery and your new insurance doesnt start yet? did you think about that? All companies that i know of will no longer insure an ex employee. why would you expect that?

i had surgery turned my truck in and paid the weekly insurance premium. i came back 6 weeks later. i doubt you will be back to work in less than 4 weeks.

what you are saying is selfish and against company interest. of course they will put abandonment on your record, they will have to recover it because you want to use a commercial vehicke.as your own private transportation. they need it to make money.

even if you tell them you.cant return cause of complications, they will see the reference request. why lie and jeopardize all you worked for?

How about preparing yourself? i saved ul $6000 for expenses for my surgery down time. budget and plan.

good luck

Michael B.'s Comment
member avatar
I’m afraid if I do this they may try and twist it as truck abandonment but also know if I’m on medical they can’t fire me. If I give notice on medical leave then they have notice as well as their truck

Kevin, they wouldnt have to twist it, it is truck abandonment. You want to drive your truck home to have your surgery which you know you wont be going back to work for the company afterwards, make them go 600 miles to pick up their truck that you already cleaned out knowing you were abandoning it, just so you dont have to spend money to get home on your own after you quit. They pay to put you into the truck because you are an employee. You have to pay for your way home after you quit because you are no longer an employee, period. Thats what adults do, face the consequences of their actions and choices dude. During my orientation I saw first hand the result of truck abandonment, once that is reported to your DAC report you will lose the job you transferred to and probably never use your CDL again all over a ride home. Good luck with that if you still chose that route but you should seriously reconsider your choices.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

And they might bill you for what they paid another driver to.pick it up.

Grumpy Old Man's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

Be 100% honest with your current employer. Put all of the cards on the table.

You’ll never know how they will support your return to duty if you apply deceitful tactics and assume their lack of compromise.

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

He isn't planning to return, that's the problem. He plans to quit while out recovering.

double-quotes-end.png

I know that.

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

Be 100% honest with your current employer. Put all of the cards on the table.

You’ll never know how they will support your return to duty if you apply deceitful tactics and assume their lack of compromise.

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

He isn't planning to return, that's the problem. He plans to quit while out recovering.

double-quotes-end.png

I understand that. The problem is how he is going about it with his current company. It’s not on the up-and-up, thus he has no clarity in the consequences.

We also have no idea why he wants to leave the current employer. It’s relevant in terms of assessing the probility of success with the new job.

Although I don’t know the whole story, I’d wait to leave the current employer (if it’s a must), recover medically with them, get back into their truck drive a bit and then execute on the other offer.

Call me old fashioned, his planned approach is the wrong way to go about this.

Oh, OK, gotcha. I thought you meant return to duty with his present company.

You, Rainy, and Michael are spot on, though I didn't even think about the new company letting him go after learning about the abandonment. Good point. I was thinking more along the lines of a reference.

And Kevin, you are concerned about what it will cost you to get home. How about what it will cost the company to come get your truck? If you were in their shoes, how would you feel if a driver just took his truck home, quit, and made you pay two drivers, fuel, etc., to go get his truck?

I would love to hear why you are quitting what appears to be your first job after 9 months. As a future employer, that would send up a red flag. What happens when job 2 doesn't work out?

Bobcat_Bob's Comment
member avatar

Abandonment is basically a career killer, plus they will probably charge you for recover costs probably exceeding your costs to get home. To me bnb you should be honest or it could cost your career.

andhe78's Comment
member avatar
I would love to hear why you are quitting what appears to be your first job after 9 months. As a future employer, that would send up a red flag. What happens when job 2 doesn't work out?

Grumpy, Kevin is a driver I’ve followed with interest on here. We both started at the same company and division at similar times, yet our two experiences couldn’t be more different. It’s interesting.

I do know Maverick treated me well when I needed emergency surgery a few months ago while I was on hometime. They came and recovered the truck no questions asked, but I also went back after recovery. Not sure how your plan would end.

Grumpy Old Man's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

I would love to hear why you are quitting what appears to be your first job after 9 months. As a future employer, that would send up a red flag. What happens when job 2 doesn't work out?

double-quotes-end.png

Grumpy, Kevin is a driver I’ve followed with interest on here. We both started at the same company and division at similar times, yet our two experiences couldn’t be more different. It’s interesting.

I do know Maverick treated me well when I needed emergency surgery a few months ago while I was on hometime. They came and recovered the truck no questions asked, but I also went back after recovery. Not sure how your plan would end.

Yes, coming to get it because you are unable to drive is different than having to get it because you quit while recovering from surgery they expected to return from.

I had forgotten you were with Maverick. They still only offer glass division for Grand Island. You must have filled the last flatbedding position they had. :)

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