Gym Time Powerlifting And Strength Training While On The Road.

Topic 24024 | Page 3

Page 3 of 3 Previous Page Go To Page:
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Brett wrote this...in complete agreement and what will be (hopefully) the last word.

You asked our advice and you got it and you’re going to ignore it anyways. So go do what you want. None of us really care. It doesn’t affect us any. We know the answers, you think you know the answers. Next time don’t ask a question if you don’t want honest answers or if you’re just going to ignore us anyways. Quit wasting our time.

...and let the Troll be Grump, he’s baiting you. Save your enthusiasm for serious inquiries.

Grumpy Old Man's Comment
member avatar

Brett wrote this...in complete agreement and what will be (hopefully) the last word.

double-quotes-start.png

You asked our advice and you got it and you’re going to ignore it anyways. So go do what you want. None of us really care. It doesn’t affect us any. We know the answers, you think you know the answers. Next time don’t ask a question if you don’t want honest answers or if you’re just going to ignore us anyways. Quit wasting our time.

double-quotes-end.png

...and let the Troll be Grump, he’s baiting you. Save your enthusiasm for serious inquiries.

good-luck.gif

(In place of a plain thumbs up)

Aubrey M.'s Comment
member avatar

Aubrey isn’t quite right...

double-quotes-start.png

Before you tear into me about 10 hour breaks, the clock still isn't really stopped when you're on a 10 hour, because other people in your company (the competition as I think Old Skool pointed out in one of his articles) are taking/running loads that could potentially be yours if you work your clock and stay in touch with dispatch correctly.

double-quotes-end.png

Aubrey overall I understand and agree with your point...

However the clocks; each have a different function and rules.

Drive clock: Only moves as you drive. 11 total hours, up to 8 total allowed until the 30 minute break is completed. This is a daily clock and will reset after a 10 hour break and/or a 34 hour reset.

Daily on-duty clock. Once started; it will not stop. Once 14 hours have been depleted, you cannot legally drive until completing a 10 hour break or 34 hour reset. You can however continue working (not driving) beyond 14 hours.

70 hour on-duty clock (aka 8-day clock). This clock only moves if on-duty or on-duty driving. If off-duty it will stop. Once it hits 0 you cannot legally drive until either completing a 34 hour reset or gaining hours from a recap (if they are available)

For more detail click here:

Learn The Logbook Rules (HOS)

We're on the same page, and you're right, the clarification was needed for someone who hasn't studied up on the clocks. I was basically trying to get at the same point you, Brett, and Rainy made in later posts....there's just not enough time if you use your clocks to maximize income. You're either managing your clocks for drive time, or trying to work in down time for other interests (which results in losing out to others for loads)...you have to prioritize.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Logbook:

A written or electronic record of a driver's duty status which must be maintained at all times. The driver records the amount of time spent driving, on-duty not driving, in the sleeper berth, or off duty. The enforcement of the Hours Of Service Rules (HOS) are based upon the entries put in a driver's logbook.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Robert D. (Raptor)'s Comment
member avatar

Hey power lifter-

You think you know more than these professionals? Think again. G-Town tried in the beginning to set you straight on the long hours you'll be facing and your time management. You ignored him. So he had to get stern. Plain and simple! You maybe be some kind of expert in weight training but you know squat about the demands of OTR drivers. So then Rainy tells you that most of the time you'll be so exhausted that you may not have time for the gym even 3 days a week much less once a week. Then Brett has to come on here to get frustrated with you because you can't get it through your thick head that you can't have your cake and eat it too. This not "Burger King," you can't have it your way. I don't think I want you on the road if this is your attitude. There are enough drivers out there who don't put safety first. You asked for advice and then you throw it back in their faces. Could your goals be achieved, maybe in a perfect world. That 70' monster is not your personal vehicle. In the old days before the Quall Comm, maybe you could get away with it. But not now. And if you think I'm over the top, then so be it. It's like "Putting an elevator in an outhouse." "It don't belong."

Now your saying to yourself that I'm not coming on this forum anymore, they treated me badly. Well then show some humility here, Brett started this forum to give the TRUTH and nothing but the TRUTH. If you are such a fanatic in your power-lifting regiment, how do you think you are going to get this accomplished. Like I said earlier, THAT 70' MONSTER IS NOT YOURS TO GO JOY RIDING TO THE GYM. What if you have a sensitive load, you can only park where it can be monitored. Which means YOU have to watch it.

As usual, if Raptor has offended anyone here, sorry, but it had to be said.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Raptor chastens the OP...

You maybe be some kind of expert in weight training but you know squat about the demands of OTR drivers.

Pun intended?

rofl-2.gif

I think he got the message...

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Robert D. (Raptor)'s Comment
member avatar

G-Town

I don't like to be harsh to people. I would like to give what I have been given. Pay it forward. When you have a regular 8-5 job and are home every night this might be a perfect way to get in those gym times. But last I looked around here that some are saying they drive at night to deliver in the morning and then go get their next load and drive 'til their clock is gone for the day. So now your 20 mile from the gym, so are you going to pay for a Uber to get there? OK I think we beat this horse to death.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Page 3 of 3 Previous Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

This topic has the following tags:

Exercise and Fitness Health Concerns Hours Of Service Life On The Road Logbook Questions Truck Driving Lifestyle
Click on any of the buttons above to view topics with that tag, or you can view a list of all forum tags here.

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More