Lots Of Experience, Now Have To Start All Over!

Topic 24062 | Page 3

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Michael S.'s Comment
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They have a training program, too.

Cypress was the first one I checked out, good regional company with the training available, they were interested in me, but sadly, they have no pet policy.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Michael S.'s Comment
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Prime is a wonderful company, so I've been told. I know they have some of the highest training pay and starting pay in the business and so many different divisions so there's lots of opportunity there.

You may not have thought about Stevens Transport. I don't know much about them, except my nephew got his start there and said they treated him extremely well and their school was good. He lives in Florida too. He only left to enter into a business partnership with his uncle/my brother in law. My brother in law works as a supervisor for FL Dept of agriculture, but also farms, in addition to a couple other businesses, and opened a portable building business. Lol, my sister is high maintenance and expensive to keep. He needed someone with a CDL-A to haul and deliver the buildings so he set my nephew up with a 3 year guaranteed contract, leased a hotshot setup for him and assisted in him getting his own operating authority and incorporating. He said if he didn't care for it, hed go back OTR.. and if he liked it, they'd renew his contract. He has another year to decide on this first round. Anywho he ran coast to coast with Stevens and always got 3k+ miles/week.

Will be checking Steven's out too, thanks

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Rainy 's Comment
member avatar

I have a friend who ran Marten dedicated from FL GA and SC and back. i dont recall the weekly pay but IMO it was a nice figure. She only drove days cause she hates night driving and had pretty much a set schedule. Give them a call.

Does anyone know if Marten does CDL schooling??

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Michael, I got on here too late to jump on your servantood comment. I'm glad you took the corrective posts in a good way.

Your 25 years of experience means you will ace all the backing training (where you can help the really new students). But too much has changed since you last drove. F'rinstance, most new drivers don't know what ICC means.

Also two examples i know from personal experience, to show you are in good company. A Swift Mentor instructor had to take 6 months off to care for a sick family member. Returning to Swift, he had to take the training course again. (Sure, he blew through the whole thing in a week, but he had to get that ticket punched.)

Also, a guy who spent 11 years in the Army managing a motor pool had to take the class. But I wish I could have videoed his pre-trip inspection - it was a thing of beauty to watch him perform it with military precision. But still 4 weeks in the academy.

Suck it up, Bro, the CDL course will get you updated and should otherwise be a breeze. Many people don't mind sticking with the first company for the year to pay it back. I started with Swift, and stayed for four years, with no complaints.

Pre-trip Inspection:

A pre-trip inspection is a thorough inspection of the truck completed before driving for the first time each day.

Federal and state laws require that drivers inspect their vehicles. Federal and state inspectors also may inspect your vehicles. If they judge a vehicle to be unsafe, they will put it “out of service” until it is repaired.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Big Scott (CFI's biggest 's Comment
member avatar

Michael, I don't know your age or physical condition. At 50,I was tired of being in pain every day to make a buck. When looking into trucking, I had zero interest in flatbed, and didn't know those boxes being pulled down the road had any difference. On this site I found the difference between refer and dry van. I ended up going to CFI for paid training and haven't looked back. I am now a finisher with them and make more money with no pain. I love pulling dry van. As far as OTR driving goes, I wouldn't leave CFI.

With all that said if you are still "crazy" enough to go flatbeding, then go to a company like Prime. They have an excellent training program and a flatbed division. Yes, I respect flatbedders for their "craziness", they are doing something totally cool that I have no desire to do.

I had a couple of people come through the CDL school I was at who were renewing a CDL. They had a lot to learn and were more frustrated then us newbies. Best of luck to you.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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