TMC CDL (in-house) Training Day 1

Topic 24229 | Page 2

Page 2 of 11 Previous Page Next Page Go To Page:
Solo's Comment
member avatar

6am: Bus to training pad

7am: Go over pre-trip of a TMC trailer

8am: Some of us were assigned to 1 truck w/ 1 driver trainer, while others were doubled-up with a trainer and we headed out to our assigned trucks. We pre-tripped the truck with the trainer and hopped in. The first thing he asked us for was our log books, permit, and DL.

830am: Trainer takes us off the property and WAY out into the middle of nowhere USA (Saw my first bald eagle in the wild and it was cool as heck) and the other trainee hopped into the driver seat and drove for about an hour practicing tight turns up/down shift, narrow bridges, etc and then drove us to a truck stop. We swapped seats and he went into the berth, and I drove us out of the stop and basically around the same loop (I was smooth as a babies ass on any and all up-shifts from anywhere in the pattern...can't downshift to save my life. I really got down on myself about this) and yes, we did finish by going down SUPER narrow Ankney blvd. Those crosswalk/curbs literally stick out into the right lane. Get back to the pad and straight-line back her in and shut her down.

11am: Lunch (all of their breakfast, lunches, and dinners (while incredibly fattening) have been good. I wouldn't say one of them was "bad" or anything negative.

12p: Load securement for 4 straight hours. We were grouped up with the week 2 guys (we're week 1) and put into teams of 4. There were 2 loads on 4 or 5 trailers inside the shop bay and 2 teams of 4 working an assigned load. We had to break the securement down, and then the instructor worked with each team while the other teams watched, to show us how to then properly secure the loads. Load securement itself can kill you...nevermind the load. #snapbinders (we used them in training, but don't use them in the field. We are issued ratchet binders)

4p: Left for the hotel.

Tomorrow week 1 and week 2 groups will head out from the hotel at 7a for the training pad and will work all of the other loads that we as a team didn't work today until 2:15p.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Turtle's Comment
member avatar

Turtle says :

"It isn't nearly as physical as I'd hoped however."

Plenty of jobs in food service.......

Touché

smile.gif

Maybe someday...

Solo's Comment
member avatar

Day 6:

7:30 am - The bus took an hour to get to us due to getting 5-7" of fresh stuff overnight, so we didn't get to the training pad until 815am

8:15 am - When we arrived, there were 3-4 snow plows and 2 bobcats doing their best to clear the training pad because there was a small group that needed to work on their backing maneuvers, but try as they may, they couldn't keep up with the pace of the snow.

8:30 am - the rest of us continued to work through various securement techniques on pre-loaded trailers. Each increasing in complexity from basic strapping, belly straps, x-straps, x-chains, snap binders, ratchet binders, and so on and so forth

12 pm - We cut for lunch

1 pm - Another trainer arrives to let us know that a Qualcomm message was sent a few hours ago and that it stated that all TMC vehicles needed to be off the road (if they were within the storm). Our trainer decided that we could do 1-2 more securements, and then call it a day. We headed out to the bus to be driven to the shop.

1:15 pm - Our trainer comes out to the bus and decides to make a command decision and call it a day, so we drove over to the shop to collect our belongings and he drove us back to the hotel as the storm had stalled and we were now expected to get double the forecasted snow, and he didn't want to be driving the bus on potentially bad roads, when there wasn't an immediate reason to do so.

2 pm: Hotel where some left for the bar to watch the NFL games, while others stayed to do laundry and study for the load securement test Sunday pm.

Tomorrow (today) we will finish the loads we weren't able to complete yesterday and then take the load securement test this evening.

Tomorrow (actually tomorrow) we begin driving on the pad and going over pre-trip.

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.
Solo's Comment
member avatar

Today Day 7:

8 am: We arrived at the training pad to complete the rest of the various securement loads (greasy bars, Steel plates, Shotgun Coil, Suicide Coil, Roof Shingles, Palleted coil, and I'm missing another).

12 pm: Lunch

1 pm: Took 75 question Load Securement exam (most earned an A, several a B, and 1 guy a C. Nobody received a D or F.

5 pm: Home

We lost a former NFL player (Steeler) today. He received a call last night from his agent and was offered a coaching job for an NFL team, though I'm not sure which team or as which coach, but I'll be sure to look him up. Nicest stranger I've met in a long time. I'm sure he'll be a-ok.

Tomorrow we start pre-trip and backing maneuvers.

Solo's Comment
member avatar

Day 8:

7 am: We start pre-trip before being split into 2 groups; 1/2 working on backing while the other 1/2 was out driving around Des Moines. I was on the backing pad for the first part of the day and was nailing the maneuvers out of the gate.

11 am: Lunch

12 pm: The group's flip-flop and I was lucky enough to land the guy "Pre-trip John" who has been driving for over 30-years. Taught CDL school at the local college for 22 years. Used to teach 1-DAY CDL CLASS for 2 people per day for 6 years...and I believe he could do it. The guy is a fantastic teacher. Incredibly patient. I drove in and around Des Moines for 4 hours and stopped at 3 truck stops and parked 4 different times.

4 pm: Return to training pad

5 pm: 4 of us were made to stay late to continue working on backing; 1 guy was made to stay late to do a 3-hour night drive, while the rest were sent home on the 5 pm bus. I was 1 of the 4 held to work on backing (They rotate us each night through this week).

8 pm: We head back to the hotel.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Solo's Comment
member avatar

Day 8:

Same start as always

630 am: Arrive at training pad and go over in-cab inspection and form A, B, C pre-trip.

8 am: I set out with a trainer for 3 hours to drive around Des Moines working on Up/Downshifting, tight turns, slowing for stop signs, running through town with several lights making sure to not run yellow. No right on red, etc etc. My downshifting was MUCH MUCH MUCH better than yesterday, and worlds apart from last week, so that was very motivating.

11 am: Lunch

12 pm: Backing maneuvers until 4 pm

5 pm: Head back to the hotel. Some were made to stay over to continue working on backing and another had to stay tonight drive. Presumably, that group will change again for tomorrow night.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Solo's Comment
member avatar

Above should read "Day 9"

Day 10

Same start as always.

630 am: Arrive at training pad and go over in-cab inspection and form A, B, C pre-trip.

8 am: Practice 45 degree backing for 1.5 hours.

930 am: Back to the backing maneuvers pad

11 am: Lunch

12 pm: I set out with a different trainer again (they try to get you with a different trainer each day, so that when test day arrives you are with somebody new...it just happens to be a DOT inspector, but you're used to not having the same person in your truck day-after-day. We drove around for 4 hours where I learned that I can row from 1st to 6th gear without ever touching the break. This teaches me a few things...I can have my foot on the brake at every stop ensuring that when I take off, I won't roll back and the truck has enough TQ to not stall out. Even more important is that I can bring the truck to a stop at a light in 6th gear w/o trying to downshift too quickly and get locked out (automatic failure) or coasting more than 1 length of the truck/trailer (automatic failure).

6 pm: Head back to the hotel

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Solo, a lot of people are reading this stuff. Don't let a lack of responses discourage you from writing these diary entries. We have a ton of people coming in here wanting to know about training with TMC. Your diary will be an excellent piece to link to when we try to help them.

Even-Keel's Comment
member avatar

Thanks Solo for the detailed write up! I was in particular shocked when you said you lost more than 1/3 of your class thru the physical. What are people thinking before they travel all the way to training? Yikes!

Keep up the good work!!

Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks Solo for the detailed write up! I was in particular shocked when you said you lost more than 1/3 of your class thru the physical. What are people thinking before they travel all the way to training? Yikes!

Keep up the good work!!

People fail the physical for many reasons. Blood pressure too high, sugar in urine (diabetes), perhaps they have a hernia they weren't aware of, or even have medications they use that aren't approved by the DOT. Unfortunately some are also failed drug screens. Some conditions require you to see your primary doctor or a specialist and write a note saying your condition will not affect your ability to safely operate a CMV. Some company's also have a lift test (tarps) that they cant safely lift.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

CMV:

Commercial Motor Vehicle

A CMV is a vehicle that is used as part of a business, is involved in interstate commerce, and may fit any of these descriptions:

  • Weighs 10,001 pounds or more
  • Has a gross vehicle weight rating or gross combination weight rating of 10,001 pounds or more
  • Is designed or used to transport 16 or more passengers (including the driver) not for compensation
  • Is designed or used to transport 9 or more passengers (including the driver) for compensation
  • Is transporting hazardous materials in a quantity requiring placards
Page 2 of 11 Previous Page Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More