Preparing For Prime Training

Topic 24271 | Page 1

Page 1 of 2 Next Page Go To Page:
Britton's Comment
member avatar

Hello everyone. Obligatory "long time reader, first time caller".

I'm at a crossroads in my life. Hell, seems every year I'm at the crossroads. Trying to find a decent and stable job that pays. Trying to take care of my family and give them the life they deserve. I'm in Western Pennsylvania and to be quite honest, I don't see anything for me career wise. Tried so many places but at the end of the day they were always jobs. Jobs that reminded me I would never be financially secure I would slowly but surely grow to feel regret for not doing something bigger.

I have read so much about the life, the school, driving, that I feel I should have a good grasp on everything. Of course you can't until you're fully into it. It's not a decision I have taken likely, I really enjoy driving as an occupation and the idea of the freedom and financial security feels great.

Then I think about the whole process and wonder how well I'm going to do. I won't have any problem with the permit test, I'm sure with hard work the driving will come to me as well. I just wonder how I will fair emotionally. Being out for two or three weeks at a time seems really tough. I'm sure that's how we all feel about it.

I decided to go with Prime because the schooling seems great, with so many options there isn't a whole lot to distinguish the choices for me, and the recruiter says I will be able to run the tanker division to have a little more home time. This is something that's important to me, having a decent idea of what I will be going through and having honesty through the whole process. I don't expect to be on that route right away. I do understand the time away for the initial training.

Can anyone at Prime tell me the chances of that actually happening? Every other company I have spoken too doesn't seem to have regional routes as an early career option. I will more than likely speak with the recruiter again on Monday and I can be sure to get that reiterated.

Anyway, I plan on sharing my experience as things progress and appreciate any input.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Spaceman Spiff's Comment
member avatar

Hi Patrick,

I'm sort of riding the same train car with you, just in a different area (socal). I am by no means an authority but I recently emailed with a recruiter about being hired for flatbed out of san Diego , to which she enthusiastically replied that they were still hiring regional flatbed drivers out of this area.

Maybe it's a regional thing, maybe it's a lease o/o thing, but speaking with your recruiter contact for more info is a good start.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Turtle's Comment
member avatar

Welcome Patrick, its nice to see new faces pop in.

Ok so you've read up a little on the lifestyle, and kinda have a handle on how it goes.

I just wonder how I will fare emotionally.

Well, I think emotions are the root cause of drivers hanging up their keys. So many come into this field with grand ideas of how great it's going to be, only to be slapped in the face by the harsh reality of life on the road. It can be wonderful, horrible, exhilarating, mind-numbing, incredibly fulfilling and desperately lonely. And that's just in one day!

You won't truly know how you'll fare until you're out here doing it. Likewise, until you've done it long enough to learn some of the ropes, you'll experience such a wide range of emotional highs and lows you never thought were possible. That's why we always stress to fulfill a one year commitment. Get to the top side of that learning curve and you'll begin to see why we love this so much.

Being out for two or three weeks at a time seems really tough.

You see, being out is the part that I love! The adventure of traveling the country for weeks and months, not knowing where I'll be next has been incredibly exciting. I understand your concern though with having a family. That something only you can decide.

As for tanker:

First let me go on record by saying I don't recommend starting out in tanker as a newbie. These are smoothbore food grade tankers, meaning no baffles inside to slow/impede the surge. This can be incredibly dangerous and difficult to learn. It can be done though.

Prime tankers are indeed regional. Draw a triangle from Savannah to Chicago to Maine and back to Savannah. You'll mostly stay within that triangle, with occasional jaunts outside.

I don't have any knowledge of the home time options for tanker, but I assume you'd have more opportunities to get home than with OTR. We used to have a Prime tanker driver here Icecold24. Enter his name in the search box above and you may likely get more information through his writings. I know he kept a diary for some time.

Good luck, come to us with questions, and let us know how you're doing.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Baffle:

A partition or separator within a liquid tank, used to inhibit the flow of fluids within the tank. During acceleration, turning, and braking, a large liquid-filled tank may produce unexpected forces on the vehicle due to the inertia of liquids.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Turtle's Comment
member avatar

Correction: His name is Icecold24k. A link to his tanker thread is here.

Rainy 's Comment
member avatar

Hi and welcome!

I agree with Turtle about not doing tanker right away Until you know how to slow down that truck safely, risking the liquid surge is not worth it.

I have written a bunch of articles on training, the lifestyle and even dealing with your marriage while OTR.

Rainys Articles

I don't think western PA is part of the Northeast regional at Prime, and honestly i wouldn't recommend that for a newbie either. Tight backing, tight curves, turns, small roads and worse are very difficult for a new driver. Add the snow, ice, and night driving and it can be a nightmare.

Also, you will be in training about 3 months or so with only one hone time break most likely.

If home time is the most important, look into Roehl. I LOVE Prime and it is great for me. However Roehl has home time options that might be more suited to you.

Keep in mind, the more you go home, the less money you make. Although Roehl has one option of 7 out 7 off, that means you are basically only getting paid 6 months per year. i remember one driver flipping out that he made now money.....well..yeah, if you were home half the year!

Roehl Home Time Plus Program

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Britton's Comment
member avatar

Well, I think emotions are the root cause of drivers hanging up their keys. So many come into this field with grand ideas of how great it's going to be, only to be slapped in the face by the harsh reality of life on the road. It can be wonderful, horrible, exhilarating, mind-numbing, incredibly fulfilling and desperately lonely. And that's just in one day!

You won't truly know how you'll fare until you're out here doing it. Likewise, until you've done it long enough to learn some of the ropes, you'll experience such a wide range of emotional highs and lows you never thought were possible. That's why we always stress to fulfill a one year commitment. Get to the top side of that learning curve and you'll begin to see why we love this so much.

I can see that, it's not for everyone. I do enjoy challenges and at this stage in life, not saying I'm old, I always expect the worse so I can prepare for the worse. The community here shows me though that even if I'm alone and out on the road there are so many people to help you through it. Also, in this day and age, technology makes it a lot easier. Not the same, but much better than nothing.

As for tanker:

First let me go on record by saying I don't recommend starting out in tanker as a newbie. These are smoothbore food grade tankers, meaning no baffles inside to slow/impede the surge. This can be incredibly dangerous and difficult to learn. It can be done though.

The more I think about it the more that makes sense. Being foodgrade it will be unbaffled. I would like to give it a shot, but I am not naive enough to think I will be an exception to the rule and be great at something clearly difficult. Something for me to think on and I have time.

Baffle:

A partition or separator within a liquid tank, used to inhibit the flow of fluids within the tank. During acceleration, turning, and braking, a large liquid-filled tank may produce unexpected forces on the vehicle due to the inertia of liquids.
Britton's Comment
member avatar

Hi and welcome!

I agree with Turtle about not doing tanker right away Until you know how to slow down that truck safely, risking the liquid surge is not worth it.

I have written a bunch of articles on training, the lifestyle and even dealing with your marriage while OTR.

I have read a lot of your posts so I was actually hoping for a reply :)

Yeah, tanker seems like a bad choice for someone out the gate. I also have to get myself through the rest of the enchilada before I even think about being able to do it, so I'll probably put that on the shelf for now.

I will of course check out everything else you have share, thank you.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Peter M.'s Comment
member avatar

Exciting news. Best of luck to you.

Grumpy Old Man's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Hi and welcome!

I agree with Turtle about not doing tanker right away Until you know how to slow down that truck safely, risking the liquid surge is not worth it.

I have written a bunch of articles on training, the lifestyle and even dealing with your marriage while OTR.

double-quotes-end.png

I have read a lot of your posts so I was actually hoping for a reply :)

Yeah, tanker seems like a bad choice for someone out the gate. I also have to get myself through the rest of the enchilada before I even think about being able to do it, so I'll probably put that on the shelf for now.

I will of course check out everything else you have share, thank you.

I have seen a few tanker accidents where there seemed to be no reason for them to be on their side, no one else involved, dry roads, etc. I assume because of surge.

Even with experience (when I have experience, I mean), I think I'll pass.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar
The more I think about it the more that makes sense. Being foodgrade it will be unbaffled. I would like to give it a shot, but I am not naive enough to think I will be an exception to the rule and be great at something clearly difficult. Something for me to think on and I have time.

You should absolutely forget about this for a while. Put it out of your mind.

You have no earthly idea what you are really saying here...it’s not about meeting a challenge, or doing your best, it’s about experience or lack-thereof and having no intuitive ability to handle a heavy truck of any kind, let alone one that will literally push you through an intersection.

Baffle:

A partition or separator within a liquid tank, used to inhibit the flow of fluids within the tank. During acceleration, turning, and braking, a large liquid-filled tank may produce unexpected forces on the vehicle due to the inertia of liquids.
Page 1 of 2 Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More