It's Not My Fault I Failed

Topic 24658 | Page 6

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Chris L's Comment
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I thought I would weigh in on this because Opinions are like A** Holes everyone has one. Is truck driving school the same as Boot Camp / Basic Training? The tenants of training is: Task, Conditions, Standards (Other services insert your perspective training terminology here). The training cycle goes with the Crawl, Walk, Run phases. You don't walk into your prospective school on day 1 and the school hands you the keys to a tractor with a 53' trailer attached to it and say " Be back in Six weeks for your test". They start out with the basic introduction to the tractor and trailer, basic skills mastery and the development of on road driving. Both Basic and Boot Camp set training milestones which the recruit need to meet before progressing to the next phase Driving school is the same - master basic operating skills move onto more challenging tasks. The main intent of Basic / Boot Camp is to put "Steel on Target"! by turning civilians into Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen, Marines, and Coastguardsmen. Trucking school are the same by "Putting Butts in the Seat". By turning civilians into entry level professional drivers that will go forth and power the nation's economic engine. I have to echo G-Towns sentiment about former service members / Veterans washing out of school because they don't take it seriously. In the group that I started in school with there was about 6 of us fellow Veterans most of the were fresh out like a couple of months to a few years (I'm hitting my 9th year since I retired) some are taking it seriously and some are not. One guy (Veteran USAF) actually told the class the only reason he was there was to collect his VA benefits and he had not intention of going into the industry. He actually missed so much class time in the first month that the school's training director (Veteran USMC) told him that if he missed any more class time the school would notify the VA of his lack of attendance and he (USAF guy) would loose his benefits and pay back what he already received. I believe that some of my fellow young Veterans actually believe that when they graduate that they will receive the Diamond Encrusted Platinum truck that runs on Unicorn Farts and get paid $5.00 for every Half mile they drive. Some have gone into this with the attitude of "I know everything I don't need to learn anything" they will all have a rude awakening when they take the NYS Road test I can guarantee that. My back ground is a trainer I had the fortunate opportunity to train Soldiers- (U.S., Iraqi, Afghan), As a School Bus driver trainer, and retired Open Water SCUBA Instructor. I love training and teaching people but when I decided to take this path I didn't put on any airs that I knew more than the instructors at the school I went in with the attitude that I was going to wring out all the knowledge that I could from the school so I would have the best foundation on which to build on to become the best professional driver I can.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Chris wrote...

I thought I would weigh in on this because Opinions are like A** Holes everyone has one. Is truck driving school the same as Boot Camp / Basic Training? The tenants of training is: Task, Conditions, Standards (Other services insert your perspective training terminology here). The training cycle goes with the Crawl, Walk, Run phases. You don't walk into your prospective school on day 1 and the school hands you the keys to a tractor with a 53' trailer attached to it and say " Be back in Six weeks for your test". They start out with the basic introduction to the tractor and trailer, basic skills mastery and the development of on road driving. Both Basic and Boot Camp set training milestones which the recruit need to meet before progressing to the next phase Driving school is the same - master basic operating skills move onto more challenging tasks. The main intent of Basic / Boot Camp is to put "Steel on Target"! by turning civilians into Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen, Marines, and Coastguardsmen. Trucking school are the same by "Putting Butts in the Seat". By turning civilians into entry level professional drivers that will go forth and power the nation's economic engine. I have to echo G-Towns sentiment about former service members / Veterans washing out of school because they don't take it seriously. In the group that I started in school with there was about 6 of us fellow Veterans most of the were fresh out like a couple of months to a few years (I'm hitting my 9th year since I retired) some are taking it seriously and some are not. One guy (Veteran USAF) actually told the class the only reason he was there was to collect his VA benefits and he had not intention of going into the industry. He actually missed so much class time in the first month that the school's training director (Veteran USMC) told him that if he missed any more class time the school would notify the VA of his lack of attendance and he (USAF guy) would loose his benefits and pay back what he already received. I believe that some of my fellow young Veterans actually believe that when they graduate that they will receive the Diamond Encrusted Platinum truck that runs on Unicorn Farts and get paid $5.00 for every Half mile they drive. Some have gone into this with the attitude of "I know everything I don't need to learn anything" they will all have a rude awakening when they take the NYS Road test I can guarantee that. My back ground is a trainer I had the fortunate opportunity to train Soldiers- (U.S., Iraqi, Afghan), As a School Bus driver trainer, and retired Open Water SCUBA Instructor. I love training and teaching people but when I decided to take this path I didn't put on any airs that I knew more than the instructors at the school I went in with the attitude that I was going to wring out all the knowledge that I could from the school so I would have the best foundation on which to build on to become the best professional driver I can.

Great reply Chris. Every bit of it. Our former friend Hobo would be well served if he followed your example. A primer for success.

Not sure what your deal is Hobo; but your unprovoked and vulgar attack on me is not only misplaced, but is cowardly, dishonorable, childish and disrespectful. The direct opposite of how every vet conducts themselves on this forum.

Not sure why you snapped for no reason, on people trying to help you. All of your comments up until last night we’re on-the-level, reasonable and represented your interest in trucking. Perhaps you have some mental sh** you are dealing with. Who knows. Take it somewhere else, get it taken care of...cause baggage like that does not mix with trucking school.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

PJ's Comment
member avatar

Chris I love your resppnse,

Rainy don’t you dare apologize, you did nothing wrong or improper. You were on point, some folks just don’t get it, or many other life’s lessons either.

Brett and G put it in the proper perspective I think.

Rob if your in St Louis and want to see anything first hand just hollar at me. I pull out of E St Louis. I’ll be back in town monday night until wed sometime.

Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

Chris I love your resppnse,

Rainy don’t you dare apologize, you did nothing wrong or improper. You were on point, some folks just don’t get it, or many other life’s lessons either.

Brett and G put it in the proper perspective I think.

Rob if your in St Louis and want to see anything first hand just hollar at me. I pull out of E St Louis. I’ll be back in town monday night until wed sometime.

thank-you-2.gif

Grumpy Old Man's Comment
member avatar

Chris I love your resppnse,

Rainy don’t you dare apologize, you did nothing wrong or improper. You were on point, some folks just don’t get it, or many other life’s lessons either.

Brett and G put it in the proper perspective I think.

Rob if your in St Louis and want to see anything first hand just hollar at me. I pull out of E St Louis. I’ll be back in town monday night until wed sometime.

Absolutely. Chris is spot on.

And so is Rainy

CDL School is like boot camp. Training is like OCS. Being a rookie is like a new infantryman on his first combat deployment. Everyone wants to stay away from him in the field cause he might get shot, or heck, might shoot you. When new drivers back into doors, other drivers point and laugh or sometimes get out to make sure their own truck doesnt get hit.

I’m also a veteran. Hobo, stop being a ******. You act like some of the others coming here (and elsewhere) acting like everyone owes you something or you are somehow special just because you served.

While I appreciate your service, you are simply one of many. You are not special, and no one owes you anything.

CDL school is like boot camp, as Rainy meant it. Not that it is particularly tough, but that it takes raw students and prepares them to be trained, and to some extent, to eliminate those who are unsuitable for training. No one comes out of boot camp ready to go to combat, just as a CDL school graduate is in no way ready to drive a truck alone.

Training is like AIT as Patrick said in another topic, or OCS as Rainy said. Both take raw soldiers, sailors, airmen or Marines and get them ready for combat or leadership. In fact, OCS may be MORE accurate than AIT, as most officers are still do green they need NCOs to help them lead.

And being a rookie IS like being a FNG or new guy. She isn’t saying they are actually ready to go in combat, and unless you are an idiot, you know it. Veterans ARE leery of FNGs because they just might do something to get them killed. Just like veteran truckers are leery of rookie drivers, because they might hit them, and yes, even get them killed.

So get off your high horse or ride it the f#*k out of here.

What was your MOS anyway? Unit? Date of service? I am curious exactly when and where you served. My guess is supply or office pogue or some other non combatant.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Grumpy Old Man's Comment
member avatar

My apologies to the mods and Brett. I’m just a former Marine, with no couth and little tolerance for idiots causing issues for those trying to help those same idiots.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Rob D.'s Comment
member avatar
Rob if your in St Louis and want to see anything first hand just hollar at me. I pull out of E St Louis. I’ll be back in town monday night until wed sometime.

PJ. I'll take you up on that offer.

I work days so nights (dinner my treat?) works for me. Let me know when and where.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

Yes, Hobo, this 32 year retiree would like to hear all about your military journey, too.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

Yes, Hobo, this 32 year retiree would like to hear all about your military journey, too.

Well, actually only 26 years in the US. The other 6 years was a vacation I had in France with The Legion.

Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar

Yes, Hobo, this 32 year retiree would like to hear all about your military journey, too.

Does ROTC count?

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