24 Hour CDL "Training" As An Option?

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Matt W.'s Comment
member avatar

Hi all,

I'm here seeking advice. I'm going into trucking when I return home to the US in June. Recently, while on a FB page for a company I'm applying for CDL training through, I saw a guy who was taking an approach I hadn't seen mentioned before. I'm ready to be ripped apart for this, but I am looking for honest feedback. Hopefully you won't be too hard on me.

Because the wait is about 2 months from acceptance at the company to starting training, he inquired about doing this "24 Hour" CDL training locally. From what I've found, they want you to come with your Class A permit in hand, they "train" you 1-on-1 for a day, then you test in the afternoon. You are driving a 6 speed synchro transmission truck with a 30' flatbed trailer. The cost is $550 for the "guaranteed" package, meaning they will retrain you and take you for testing as many times as it takes to get your license. This covers pre-trip and road tests. I'm not under any illusion that this will be "training," I suspect it will be an intense cram session.

The guy who made the post inquired with the recruiter at the company, and they confirmed this would be valid and they would even reimburse the expense of the training. The recruiter said he could expect to spend a bit more time on the trainer's truck to get him up to speed. They have had people with them who never did any training and just got a CDL on their own by renting a truck.

This looked like a possibility to me for a few reasons: - From everything I've read, the more expensive CDL schools and company CDL training all have the same goal: just get you your license. - I don't waI'nt to actually submit any application until I'm back in the US, because I don't think they'll take me seriously yet (I've had one rejected). - Because of the above point, my waiting time once I get back will be significant. - I'm confident I can study to pass the permit tests on my own, and at least acquaint myself with all the pre-trip points. - The company I'm looking at uses automatic transmissions, and I wouldn't get the restriction on my license if I tested in this easier manual. - The wait for orientation if I already have a CDL is MUCH shorter.

This seems like a not-terrible approach for someone who is motivated to learn on their own, and I am. But I'm obviously inexperienced with this stuff, so I'm thankful for any advice or questions you may have about my thinking.

Also, where does the DOT physical fit into this? Do I need that before getting my CDL, or is that a separate thing?

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

BMI:

Body mass index (BMI)

BMI is a formula that uses weight and height to estimate body fat. For most people, BMI provides a reasonable estimate of body fat. The BMI's biggest weakness is that it doesn't consider individual factors such as bone or muscle mass. BMI may:

  • Underestimate body fat for older adults or other people with low muscle mass
  • Overestimate body fat for people who are very muscular and physically fit

It's quite common, especially for men, to fall into the "overweight" category if you happen to be stronger than average. If you're pretty strong but in good shape then pay no attention.

Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

Do you have a US drivers license? You need to have one for one full year before anything can transpire.

Matt W.'s Comment
member avatar

Do you have a US drivers license? You need to have one for one full year before anything can transpire.

Hi Rainy. Yes, I'm an American with a valid Missouri DL. I've just been over here for the past year working.

Hobo's Comment
member avatar

Also, where does the DOT physical fit into this? Do I need that before getting my CDL , or is that a separate thing?

I don't know if this is a federal or state requirement but in my state you have to have the DOT card in order to take the CDL skills test so definitely check your state online.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Matt, almost any company hiring inexperienced drivers has to have a training certificate indicating 160 hours of training on file to be able to hire you. It might be a legitimate way to get licensed, but I assume your end goal is employment. I would never recommend you take that path. There are plenty of companies offering Paid CDL Training Programs.

I think your biggest problem is going to be job verification. That's always an issue for expats coming back to the states.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Matt W.'s Comment
member avatar

Matt, almost any company hiring inexperienced drivers has to have a training certificate indicating 160 hours of training on file to be able to hire you. It might be a legitimate way to get licensed, but I assume your end goal is employment. I would never recommend you take that path. There are plenty of companies offering Paid CDL Training Programs.

I think your biggest problem is going to be job verification. That's always an issue for expats coming back to the states.

Thanks Old School. Good to know. I want to drive flatbed so I've read a lot of your posts.

I agree with the job verification point, that's my biggest concern. I've had two jobs here. My former director has agreed to be a reference and I have a phone number and email for him. My current job is more professional, and I have phone numbers, emails, my contract, and pay proof using bank statements for that one. I've been speaking to recruiters about what I need so I can get my ducks in a row before I leave here. Some say email is okay. Others say pay proof is okay. It seems to vary...

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
LDRSHIP's Comment
member avatar

As OS stated that 24 hr thing may get you a CDL , but without recent experience or 160 certificate, you are not getting a job. Please do not try to cut corners. Training for this is already abbreviated and rushed. To further cut corners is just flat out unsafe.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Dave Reid's Comment
member avatar

Don't do any sort of rushed training. That sounds like the scuba industry "resort course", except there you only kill yourself, not folks on the road

You're largely correct that most licensing schools are primarily about getting the CDL , not the real world; still, you'll learn a lot of foundational stuff to build on in a good 160 hour program

Regarding the company GYCDL programs, some of those that are operated by company staff at their facilities are really good and between that and their transition into OTR training, they help you prepare well.

Hi all,

I'm here seeking advice. I'm going into trucking when I return home to the US in June. Recently, while on a FB page for a company I'm applying for CDL training through, I saw a guy who was taking an approach I hadn't seen mentioned before. I'm ready to be ripped apart for this, but I am looking for honest feedback. Hopefully you won't be too hard on me.

Because the wait is about 2 months from acceptance at the company to starting training, he inquired about doing this "24 Hour" CDL training locally. From what I've found, they want you to come with your Class A permit in hand, they "train" you 1-on-1 for a day, then you test in the afternoon. You are driving a 6 speed synchro transmission truck with a 30' flatbed trailer. The cost is $550 for the "guaranteed" package, meaning they will retrain you and take you for testing as many times as it takes to get your license. This covers pre-trip and road tests. I'm not under any illusion that this will be "training," I suspect it will be an intense cram session.

The guy who made the post inquired with the recruiter at the company, and they confirmed this would be valid and they would even reimburse the expense of the training. The recruiter said he could expect to spend a bit more time on the trainer's truck to get him up to speed. They have had people with them who never did any training and just got a CDL on their own by renting a truck.

This looked like a possibility to me for a few reasons: - From everything I've read, the more expensive CDL schools and company CDL training all have the same goal: just get you your license. - I don't waI'nt to actually submit any application until I'm back in the US, because I don't think they'll take me seriously yet (I've had one rejected). - Because of the above point, my waiting time once I get back will be significant. - I'm confident I can study to pass the permit tests on my own, and at least acquaint myself with all the pre-trip points. - The company I'm looking at uses automatic transmissions, and I wouldn't get the restriction on my license if I tested in this easier manual. - The wait for orientation if I already have a CDL is MUCH shorter.

This seems like a not-terrible approach for someone who is motivated to learn on their own, and I am. But I'm obviously inexperienced with this stuff, so I'm thankful for any advice or questions you may have about my thinking.

Also, where does the DOT physical fit into this? Do I need that before getting my CDL, or is that a separate thing?

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

BMI:

Body mass index (BMI)

BMI is a formula that uses weight and height to estimate body fat. For most people, BMI provides a reasonable estimate of body fat. The BMI's biggest weakness is that it doesn't consider individual factors such as bone or muscle mass. BMI may:

  • Underestimate body fat for older adults or other people with low muscle mass
  • Overestimate body fat for people who are very muscular and physically fit

It's quite common, especially for men, to fall into the "overweight" category if you happen to be stronger than average. If you're pretty strong but in good shape then pay no attention.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Robert D. (Raptor)'s Comment
member avatar

Matt W

As a former driver and returning after almost 9 years later, I have found that the traffic is heavier than before. The skills I had were greatly diminished as when you work out 3-4 days a week, then stop for considerable amount of time. Your muscles diminish also. So I would recommend that you go to company sponsored training. Not because I'll get a "kick back", but because your first year is going to be the most brutal case of "I told you to GOAL (GET OUT AND LOOK)". I went to private truck school, I wish I had gone to Swift academy instead.

Traffic, learning your basic skills, learning what your tractor can do and what it can't. You will learn the company's way of doing things, learning why you have to turn this way and that way to maneuver that trailer. And a 24 hour course is not good enough to learn in one day. You need the time to process everything there is to get your CDL first then it is out with a mentor for 4-6 weeks. That is still the easy part. Fast forward, you have your CDL, get with a good company, then the time management starts to kick in. You are the one to make sure you get everything done right. NO ONE THERE TO HOLD YOUR HAND ANYMORE!

Are you starting to see the picture? Next you go your first trip and you have no clue of how to navigate the city you are in, everything you planned will not happen, because the city has major construction projects going on and you now have to figure how to get around it.

Next, there delays at shipper or consignee. You only have 4 hours left on your clock, but either the shipper or consignee ar another 7 hours away. You need to be there for your appointment at say 1100 and it's now 1930, can you make to your destination on time? You have a 15- 30 minute pre-trip, you had to spend 10 hours in the sleeper, then drive for another 3-4 hours to get to your destination. Oh wait, there is a big accident on the road you are traveling on. Etc, etc etc! Everyone has had to go through ALL OF THESE THINGS. I'm not beating up on you, I'm just trying to make you aware of things that can and will happen. Good luck but try to think of the vast knowledge on this forum. The moderators and experienced drivers on here.

Raptor

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Consignee:

The customer the freight is being delivered to. Also referred to as "the receiver". The shipper is the customer that is shipping the goods, the consignee is the customer receiving the goods.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Company Sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

Matt W.'s Comment
member avatar

Haha, ok ok, you guys win. The whole thing sounded a little crazy to me too, I think I'm just a bit eager. But you're right. I just needed to ask so you'd knock this stupid idea out of my head.

Thanks very much for everyone's input. I want to do things the right way.

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