APU And Air Conditioning

Topic 25276 | Page 2

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Jamie's Comment
member avatar
BTW, Jamie, what exactly do you have on your truck?

I have an APU and inverter, absolutely love it. Plus I've put the TV to use by watching king of the hill or something every night before bed. rofl-1.gif

APU:

Auxiliary Power Unit

On tractor trailers, and APU is a small diesel engine that powers a heat and air conditioning unit while charging the truck's main batteries at the same time. This allows the driver to remain comfortable in the cab and have access to electric power without running the main truck engine.

Having an APU helps save money in fuel costs and saves wear and tear on the main engine, though they tend to be expensive to install and maintain. Therefore only a very small percentage of the trucks on the road today come equipped with an APU.

Grumpy Old Man's Comment
member avatar

The problem is, states, and even cities are becoming more and more hostile to idling.

https://cdllife.com/2019/list-can-help-keep-getting-fined-idling-long/

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Jamie's Comment
member avatar

The problem is, states, and even cities are becoming more and more hostile to idling.

https://cdllife.com/2019/list-can-help-keep-getting-fined-idling-long/

A lot of places don't enforce the idling laws while some are very strict.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Grumpy Old Man's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

The problem is, states, and even cities are becoming more and more hostile to idling.

https://cdllife.com/2019/list-can-help-keep-getting-fined-idling-long/

double-quotes-end.png

A lot of places don't enforce the idling laws while some are very strict.

True, but the potential is there.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Bruce K.'s Comment
member avatar

I guess due to my frugal nature, I don’t really like to idle all night. With the bunk heaters, I think I only had to idle all night twice this winter, and that was per company policy below 10 degrees. But like PackRat said, I’ll idle anytime to get a good nights sleep. It’s called “idle while you are idle” lol

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

PJ's Comment
member avatar

I will throw this out there. The emissions systems do not like idling. The more you idle the more it tends to fill up the dpf filters. It gets costly normally maintaining these systems. Also wear and tear on the engine. My truck burns approx 3/4 of a gallon of fuel to idle. The apu uses approx. 1 pint. I change the apu oil when I do the truck engine. My apu has had some regular issues, water pump and belt. It is 9 years old and runs strong. Plus in those states that have no idle policies I have no worries. Customers have granted me permission to stay on site as long as I agreed to not idle. That preserves time on my clock for getting another load for the week most of the time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

APU:

Auxiliary Power Unit

On tractor trailers, and APU is a small diesel engine that powers a heat and air conditioning unit while charging the truck's main batteries at the same time. This allows the driver to remain comfortable in the cab and have access to electric power without running the main truck engine.

Having an APU helps save money in fuel costs and saves wear and tear on the main engine, though they tend to be expensive to install and maintain. Therefore only a very small percentage of the trucks on the road today come equipped with an APU.

Solo's Comment
member avatar

My 2020 TMC provided Peterbilt doesn't come w/ an APU , nor does any truck in our fleet.

That being said, I'm starting to form sweat on my brow here in N. Texas, and turning the truck on until it cools down outside...if that ever happens around here.

APU:

Auxiliary Power Unit

On tractor trailers, and APU is a small diesel engine that powers a heat and air conditioning unit while charging the truck's main batteries at the same time. This allows the driver to remain comfortable in the cab and have access to electric power without running the main truck engine.

Having an APU helps save money in fuel costs and saves wear and tear on the main engine, though they tend to be expensive to install and maintain. Therefore only a very small percentage of the trucks on the road today come equipped with an APU.

andhe78's Comment
member avatar

It’s handy having an apu when part of your bonus hinges on idle time.

APU:

Auxiliary Power Unit

On tractor trailers, and APU is a small diesel engine that powers a heat and air conditioning unit while charging the truck's main batteries at the same time. This allows the driver to remain comfortable in the cab and have access to electric power without running the main truck engine.

Having an APU helps save money in fuel costs and saves wear and tear on the main engine, though they tend to be expensive to install and maintain. Therefore only a very small percentage of the trucks on the road today come equipped with an APU.

Grumpy Old Man's Comment
member avatar

I have an epu , but the batteries are dead and won’t charge, so it is worthless.

Hopefully I can get it fixed next trip to the terminal

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

Turtle's Comment
member avatar

Until recently, Prime had a strict "no idle" policy for their trucks. For that reason, not having an APU would've indeed been a deal breaker for me. I will not be uncomfortable in my own home. And let's face it, this truck is my home.

There were a few times where my APU conked out in the summer. In those instances I went to a hotel, and Prime took care of the bill. I'll give them credit for that. They wanted us comfortable, no matter the cost.

They have since relaxed the policy to allow idling in temps below 30 and above 80.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

APU:

Auxiliary Power Unit

On tractor trailers, and APU is a small diesel engine that powers a heat and air conditioning unit while charging the truck's main batteries at the same time. This allows the driver to remain comfortable in the cab and have access to electric power without running the main truck engine.

Having an APU helps save money in fuel costs and saves wear and tear on the main engine, though they tend to be expensive to install and maintain. Therefore only a very small percentage of the trucks on the road today come equipped with an APU.

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