Company Vs Paying For Your Own Cdl

Topic 25342 | Page 2

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Ed L.'s Comment
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One of the big factors for me was the ability to take advantage of my Military GI Bill bennefits. This will help me cushion my transition into the truck driving profession. There are quite a few trucking companies that offer an "apprenticeship" program for veterans. Originally, I planned to go to Roehl, but at the last minute I discovered Nuusbaum Transportation. My plan is to attend a private training school, obtain my CDL , and then get into Nuusbaum's finishing program. Remember too, not all apprenticeship programs are structured the same. For example, Roehl's apprenticeship program lasts 2 years and the amount of money offered each month is a lot less than Nuusbaum's 1 year enrollment per month. Just some food for thought.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Andrew J.'s Comment
member avatar

I started in July with the Roehl GYCDL program and went solo in the beginning of September which gives me about 8 months solo. For the last 6 months I’ve made 28372 and I’m in the refrigerated national division. I have stayed out for extended periods of time. The most I believe being 6 weeks at a time. They almost always have kept me moving. I did sit for New Years day in north Carolina cause there wasn’t any freight but that was the only time and I didn’t complain. Granted some runs have been short but I get short haul pay. I’ve been called by the operations manager stating how well I’ve been doing. I do everything they give me and I make sure I’m not late. I very rarely complain to dispatch. Although I admit sometimes it is hard to keep a cool head with some of the things that happen but I’m trying. Moral of the story is if you try you will do well.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Scott D wrote:

I chose to pay mine on my own. opens up many more companies and options. and no contracts. and most still have monthly tuition reimbursements.

Not really...cannot agree completely with that. Can you provide examples? Examples you have personally experienced?

Please read this: Busting the Free Agent Myth

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
's Comment
member avatar

Any driver should stay with his first company a year at least. My point is that I think the contract issue is really a moot point.

I agree that one should stay with a company for the entire first year. Then a lot of doors open up. Unfortunately the whole contract thing is not a moot point or tuition reimbursement without contract. Often these terms are over more than a year, gradual at first and bigger payments in the end. If one can avoid both, one has more power at the end of the first year to survey the open market. Get your schooling paid for by a grant or GI is the best deal. Then you have more opportunities to look at several companies, some even offering a bonus up front. If a company is doing everything right for it's drivers there is no need for a contract. It goes both ways, trust. This would be the last means for getting thru school, contract, that I would recommend. If your going to go this route, at least try for a future high paying job, like Old Dominion or Estes.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
If a company is doing everything right for it's drivers there is no need for a contract. It goes both ways, trust.

Really? Let me ask you something........why would a company that has thousands of trucks and has been successful at the highest level in the trucking industry for decades trust some guy off the street who has never driven a truck one mile in his life? Explain that to me.

Not only that, but the company is going to pay for your training up front. You don't think it's fair for them to expect you to work for them for a year in return for the training they paid for?

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
This would be the last means for getting thru school, contract, that I would recommend.

We appreciate your recommendation. How many years of trucking experience did you say you have?

Tractor Man's Comment
member avatar

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Any driver should stay with his first company a year at least. My point is that I think the contract issue is really a moot point.

double-quotes-end.png

I agree that one should stay with a company for the entire first year. Then a lot of doors open up. Unfortunately the whole contract thing is not a moot point or tuition reimbursement without contract. Often these terms are over more than a year, gradual at first and bigger payments in the end. If one can avoid both, one has more power at the end of the first year to survey the open market. Get your schooling paid for by a grant or GI is the best deal. Then you have more opportunities to look at several companies, some even offering a bonus up front. If a company is doing everything right for it's drivers there is no need for a contract. It goes both ways, trust. This would be the last means for getting thru school, contract, that I would recommend. If your going to go this route, at least try for a future high paying job, like Old Dominion or Estes.

Mark, Who do you drive for? How did you receive your training? How much did you pay for your training? How is your Company reimbursing you? What commitment did you make to get the tuition reimbursement? I don't know of a single Company that will reimburse tuition without a contract/ commitment. Please enlighten me/us.

smile.gif

's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

If a company is doing everything right for it's drivers there is no need for a contract. It goes both ways, trust.

double-quotes-end.png

Really? Let me ask you something........why would a company that has thousands of trucks and has been successful at the highest level in the trucking industry for decades trust some guy off the street who has never driven a truck one mile in his life? Explain that to me.

Let me ask you something. Why would anyone trust a company that needs to constantly hire new drivers because of high turn over rate and subject those drivers to a contract (slavery)? What are they doing wrong that makes them need to resort to such tactics? Explain that to me.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Tractor Man's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

If a company is doing everything right for it's drivers there is no need for a contract. It goes both ways, trust.

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

Really? Let me ask you something........why would a company that has thousands of trucks and has been successful at the highest level in the trucking industry for decades trust some guy off the street who has never driven a truck one mile in his life? Explain that to me.

double-quotes-end.png

Let me ask you something. Why would anyone trust a company that needs to constantly hire new drivers because of high turn over rate and subject those drivers to a contract (slavery)? What are they doing wrong that makes them need to resort to such tactics? Explain that to me.

Ok Mark. You don't have your CDL and you don't know squat. Is that what we can infer from your refusal to answer a few simple questions! Are you a politician by any chance? Great non answer.

confused.gif

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Tractor Man's Comment
member avatar

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