Prime PSD Training, From A Trainer's Perspective.

Topic 25397 | Page 5

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PackRat's Comment
member avatar

Great to read about your continued success. I’m afraid this student is going to “spoil” you, though, as the rest will not all be as proficient. I wish they all could be rock stars like your guy seems to be an above-average performer.good-luck.gif

Bruce K.'s Comment
member avatar

Turtle, excellent account of those events. And you are wise to let him do the city stuff while you are there. My trainer purposely routed us through some urban areas when we could have gone around them. And it never gave me any heartburn for exactly the reason you cite: The security of an experienced driver in the other seat. You have great instincts, my man!

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Turtle's Comment
member avatar

Yeah I'm quite sure I'm spoiled now. Undoubtedly I'll get a tough nut to crack next time! That'll be the real test.

Dave S (formerly known as's Comment
member avatar

Turtle, really like reading about the trainer's perspective. I thought about doing Wilson Logistics version of PSD , D-Seat, but I'm a horrible passenger! Therefore I give you proper respect for being able to do student training!

PSD:

Prime Student Driver

Prime Inc has a CDL training program and the first phase is referred to as PSD. You'll get your permit and then 10,000 miles of on the road instruction.

The following is from Prime's website:

Prime’s PSD begins with you obtaining your CDL permit. Then you’ll go on the road with a certified CDL instructor for no less than 75 hours of one-on-one behind the wheel training. After training, you’ll return to Prime’s corporate headquarters in Springfield, Missouri, for final CDL state testing and your CDL license.

Obtain CDL Permit / 4 Days

  • Enter program, study and test for Missouri CDL permit.
  • Start driving/training at Prime Training Center in Springfield, Missouri.
  • Work toward 40,000 training dispatched miles (minimum) with food allowance while without CDL (Food allowance is paid back with future earnings).

On-the-Road Instruction / 10,000 Miles

  • Train with experienced certified CDL instructor for 3-4 weeks in a real world environment.
  • Get 75 hours of behind-the-wheel time with one-on-one student/instructor ratio.
  • Earn 10,000 miles toward total 40,000 miles needed.
Turtle's Comment
member avatar

Recently, I was into an OC and I saw a poster advertising for drivers to become trainers. It said a trainer made $60 per day extra to do training runs. Is this a standard rate? Frankly it seemed a little low to me. I can’t really believe my road trainer put up with me for just $60 per day. I think I should have been worth at least $100. Lol

Sorry for failing to answer this question, Bruce. It slipped by me.

That's a ballpark of the flat rate I get additionally for training. There are extra bonuses applied per student as well, based on their success and retention. But frankly, I'm not doing this just for the money. It's something I can do, so why not do it?

Of course, I wouldn't turn down the dough, either...

Rob D.'s Comment
member avatar

Turtle,

I think you have every reason to puff your chest out. I think that your level headed demeanor from the beginning set a positive atmosphere for learning. And you have allowed him to face challenges, but with your very competent oversight keeping him safe. I'm sure that has made him feel more at ease and is the reason why he is doing so well. In short, it may be some of the quality of the student, I but I think that it is by far more the quality of the trainer.

I hope I get the chance to train with you next spring.

Rick S.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Recently, I was into an OC and I saw a poster advertising for drivers to become trainers. It said a trainer made $60 per day extra to do training runs. Is this a standard rate? Frankly it seemed a little low to me. I can’t really believe my road trainer put up with me for just $60 per day. I think I should have been worth at least $100. Lol

double-quotes-end.png

Sorry for failing to answer this question, Bruce. It slipped by me.

That's a ballpark of the flat rate I get additionally for training. There are extra bonuses applied per student as well, based on their success and retention. But frankly, I'm not doing this just for the money. It's something I can do, so why not do it?

Of course, I wouldn't turn down the dough, either...

Since a PSD trainer isn't getting the typical number of miles that you would being a solo driver, I'd think that in order to get a decent paycheck to survive, pay IS a thing (even if it's not the most important thing).

What kind of compensation DOES a PSD trainer get? All the students miles PLUS $60 a day (which would almost make up for the lack of miles).

Rick

PSD:

Prime Student Driver

Prime Inc has a CDL training program and the first phase is referred to as PSD. You'll get your permit and then 10,000 miles of on the road instruction.

The following is from Prime's website:

Prime’s PSD begins with you obtaining your CDL permit. Then you’ll go on the road with a certified CDL instructor for no less than 75 hours of one-on-one behind the wheel training. After training, you’ll return to Prime’s corporate headquarters in Springfield, Missouri, for final CDL state testing and your CDL license.

Obtain CDL Permit / 4 Days

  • Enter program, study and test for Missouri CDL permit.
  • Start driving/training at Prime Training Center in Springfield, Missouri.
  • Work toward 40,000 training dispatched miles (minimum) with food allowance while without CDL (Food allowance is paid back with future earnings).

On-the-Road Instruction / 10,000 Miles

  • Train with experienced certified CDL instructor for 3-4 weeks in a real world environment.
  • Get 75 hours of behind-the-wheel time with one-on-one student/instructor ratio.
  • Earn 10,000 miles toward total 40,000 miles needed.
Bruce K.'s Comment
member avatar

Rick, I believe that with Schneider the trainer got credit for all the miles. I got paid a daily amount I think was $80 per day, but I know it was a lump sum not per mile. That works pretty good because in our case, I was eager to drive as many miles as I could and the trainer was willing to let me.

Not sure how other companies structure it with trainers.

Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

Prime PSD Instructor pay is as follows:

All miles for company drivers/revenue for lease ops plus $300 per week

$500 bonus when the person passes the test after any amount of tries

$850 bonus if they pass on the first try

The PSD trainer also gets the following retention bonuses even if he does not TnT the student:

$500 when they upgrade to solo

$500 when they stay 6 mos

$500 when they complete a year Basically, If you PSD one student for even a week to 2 weeks, you are potentially making $2650 plus miles if they stay a year.

Because of the bonus structure, company trainers do better with PSD. I know company instructors who live in Sprimo, run one student to St Louis and back the next day take out another the next day, then teach backing pad to others who had no driving issues but needed backing practice.

they get the bonuses for all they test out and pass. They can make well over $100k and stay a good portion of time at home in the terminal. I know one who tests out 3 to 4 per week, gets home to FL every other weekend and is quite happy.

TNT trainers pay is different. We make less for the first 3000 miles then make more for additional miles. We get paid all truck miles, and get a $500 bonus for upgrading to solo. Because of this, the first week I make less than i would solo because i start then out solo and am paid less per miles.

Honestly, I dont think the pay is worth TNT training. I do it to help new drivers and help my FM get good drivers on his fleet.

For those of you wondering how one sleeps with a rookie driving....think about this one....

I did more miles with my permit than Robsteeler or Big Scott did with their CDL before upgrading to solo. By the time I am teaming with a student they could have been solo at another company. At least i am there to help. Good students will listen and learn, and you learn who you can trust and who you can't. I was a safe driver i a car, and I was safe driving a rig even in training. i look for safe people before i even meet them. im not keeping an unsafe driver on my truck. And i mentioned on that "other Prime thread" about employment verification that i will not accept someone who wants to argue every thing i say.

I met one woman who asked if we had to follow certain routes. I tried to explain that routes are recommended by fuel stop prices and tolls. If i want to avoid, say the GW bridge i just go the Tappen Zee... if i want to avoid Vail Mountain, i drop down to I-40. No one says boo.

This woman then start waving her fingers. "whats the big deal about the GW, i live in NYC it is nothing...and Vail? A mountain is a mountain. If people dont want to drive certain places why be truckers?". I got up and walked away from the table. She asked whether we had to follow routes.. why did she bother? She should just driver where told then.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

PSD:

Prime Student Driver

Prime Inc has a CDL training program and the first phase is referred to as PSD. You'll get your permit and then 10,000 miles of on the road instruction.

The following is from Prime's website:

Prime’s PSD begins with you obtaining your CDL permit. Then you’ll go on the road with a certified CDL instructor for no less than 75 hours of one-on-one behind the wheel training. After training, you’ll return to Prime’s corporate headquarters in Springfield, Missouri, for final CDL state testing and your CDL license.

Obtain CDL Permit / 4 Days

  • Enter program, study and test for Missouri CDL permit.
  • Start driving/training at Prime Training Center in Springfield, Missouri.
  • Work toward 40,000 training dispatched miles (minimum) with food allowance while without CDL (Food allowance is paid back with future earnings).

On-the-Road Instruction / 10,000 Miles

  • Train with experienced certified CDL instructor for 3-4 weeks in a real world environment.
  • Get 75 hours of behind-the-wheel time with one-on-one student/instructor ratio.
  • Earn 10,000 miles toward total 40,000 miles needed.

TNT:

Trainer-N-Trainee

Prime Inc has their own CDL training program and it's divided into two phases - PSD and TNT.

The PSD (Prime Student Driver) phase is where you'll get your permit and then go on the road for 10,000 miles with a trainer. When you come back you'll get your CDL license and enter the TNT phase.

The TNT phase is the second phase of training where you'll go on the road with an experienced driver for 30,000 miles of team driving. You'll receive 14¢ per mile ($700 per week guaranteed) during this phase. Once you're finished with TNT training you will be assigned a truck to run solo.

LDRSHIP's Comment
member avatar

TBH, I personally think a CLP holder has NO business moving freight, period. It baffles me how anybody thinks that is good idea. sorry, to all the primates. But has a single one of you ever thought about it. Day 1 and your in a fully loaded semi, even the military isn’t THAT stupid!!! It is just asking for a family to get killed by someone. I can’t fathom how anybody would consider that a good idea.

Sorry, it just bothers me that they would even consider that to be a smart thing to do. Personally, I think it is endangering the public.

What is worse is C.R. England has a brand new CLP holder team drive. I know corporations are greedy, but dang.

Well, Rant over. I guess The best I can hope for is maybe after a CLP holder kills a family or two, some prosecutor will just go ahead and charge the people at the top with murder. Since they knowingly with premeditation place other lives in jeopardy without conscience or care.

Baffle:

A partition or separator within a liquid tank, used to inhibit the flow of fluids within the tank. During acceleration, turning, and braking, a large liquid-filled tank may produce unexpected forces on the vehicle due to the inertia of liquids.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

CLP:

Commercial Learner's Permit

Before getting their CDL, commercial drivers will receive their commercial learner's permit (CLP) upon passing the written portion of the CDL exam. They will not have to retake the written exam to get their CDL.

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