Swift Refrigerated

Topic 25434 | Page 4

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Marc Lee's Comment
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PURDY!

Happy new truck Gladhands!

smile.gif

You'll do great! You have the "TT Attitude"!

Gladhand's Comment
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First day went alright. Had to deliver a second part of a load to Shamrock Foods up the road. Took 2 hrs for them to unload me. Wasted another do hours dealing with claims because there was damaged freight from a prior stop that was not reported to claims. Wasted time just to be told to throw it.

After that I made my way back down the road to get a washout. Knew I was picking up dairy from shamrocks farms so I set the reefer to 32 just like Walmart has it, so I could precool the trailer. Got to Shamrock farms and was loaded within a hr.

Had to go back down the to weigh it at the busy loves in Tolleson, thankfully it was legal.

I was routed to go up to Grand Junction and then take 70 to Denver, but seeing the possibility for snow, I got re routed through New Mexico up i25.

Finished my first day with making it to the TA in Holbrook, AZ.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Gladhand's Comment
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Day 2

Got up bright and early, did the usual morning stuff, pre trip, and then hit the road. Good wide open day of driving interstate roads. Hit some snow, but it wasn't sticking. DM called to let me know the reroute was a good idea, another driver took Swift's route and ended up shutting down.

Basic day of driving really, made it to Loves in Pueblo, Colorado to take my break. Got called by my dm informing me of my next load going to San Jose, California. Going to sleep at the final on Friday that way I will have just about a full clock when I go to pick up the load going to San Jose and at least make it to Evanston, WY by the end of that shift.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Scott S.'s Comment
member avatar

At a previous company I worked at, the reefers had presets that they would like them to be set on per instructions on the shipper or receiver side. Do the reefers have that, or do you just set the temperature?

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Gladhand's Comment
member avatar

At a previous company I worked at, the reefers had presets that they would like them to be set on per instructions on the shipper or receiver side. Do the reefers have that, or do you just set the temperature?

They may have it, I'm not sure. I just used my knowledge from previous reefer experience with Walmart to precool the trailer. They ended up wanting the trailer at 34 so I was good.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Scott S.'s Comment
member avatar

How are you liking the International so far? Mine had a creaking noise that my wife described as "driving an Igloo cooler" when going down the road. I was told that it was the sound of the rubber hood latches, but I didn't keep it long enough to find out for sure.

Big T's Comment
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I did the same thing. Picked up in California going to north Platte via new Mexico to try and avoid the storm on the 70.

First day went alright. Had to deliver a second part of a load to Shamrock Foods up the road. Took 2 hrs for them to unload me. Wasted another do hours dealing with claims because there was damaged freight from a prior stop that was not reported to claims. Wasted time just to be told to throw it.

After that I made my way back down the road to get a washout. Knew I was picking up dairy from shamrocks farms so I set the reefer to 32 just like Walmart has it, so I could precool the trailer. Got to Shamrock farms and was loaded within a hr.

Had to go back down the to weigh it at the busy loves in Tolleson, thankfully it was legal.

I was routed to go up to Grand Junction and then take 70 to Denver, but seeing the possibility for snow, I got re routed through New Mexico up i25.

Finished my first day with making it to the TA in Holbrook, AZ.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Bruce K.'s Comment
member avatar

Gladhand, you must get to see a lot of spectacular scenery where you drive. I must say I'm a little envious.

Scott S.'s Comment
member avatar

How's the OTR reefer life treating you Gladhand? Hope all is well so far. I'd like to know what kind of solo miles you are doing there as OTR.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Gladhand's Comment
member avatar

How are you liking the International so far? Mine had a creaking noise that my wife described as "driving an Igloo cooler" when going down the road. I was told that it was the sound of the rubber hood latches, but I didn't keep it long enough to find out for sure.

I really like it. Heard a lot of bad things and so far I can't say anything being it's still new and no problems have arrived.

How's the OTR reefer life treating you Gladhand? Hope all is well so far. I'd like to know what kind of solo miles you are doing there as OTR.

Good so far. Compared to dry van I am pre-planned before I finished each of the few loads I have done. Also my dm checks in with me weekly and I like that reefer has a main set of planners so it is easier to "prove" one's self. It is also helpful that I have a more proactive dm now.

Can't say too much yet being I am still getting back in the otr groove, but here is the miles I have seen so far.

Load #1. Local load, Phoenix to Phoenix. Load #2 Phoenix, AZ to Denver, CO 852. Load #3 Greeley, Co to San Jose, CA 1288. Load #4 Watsonville, CA to (load has 5 stops) Riverdale, UT being the last stop. 894.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

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