Clock Management Question.

Topic 25516 | Page 1

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RealDiehl's Comment
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I just finished my day today, the 9th at 15:00. I have 7 hours left on my 70 and get zero back at midnight. Tomorrow midnight I get 10. I am about 9-10 hours away from my delivery. Delivery is scheduled for any time on the 11th. My FM said I could deliver ASAP. I was thinking of driving 6+ hours tomorrow, shutting down, and waiting until midnight to head to delivery. However, if I stay here for 34 hours, I will reset my 70 and still be able to deliver by 14:00 on the 11th. I hope I explained everything clearly. What would you suggest? I'm waiting to hear from my FM but I'd also like other opinions.

And if I'm missing something obvious here, please be kind. Lol

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Grumpy Old Man's Comment
member avatar

I think personally I would do the reset since you have to kill time anyway. Then at least you have a full 70 afterward.

Grumpy Old Man's Comment
member avatar

Well minus what you drive to get to the consignee

I think personally I would do the reset since you have to kill time anyway. Then at least you have a full 70 afterward.

Consignee:

The customer the freight is being delivered to. Also referred to as "the receiver". The shipper is the customer that is shipping the goods, the consignee is the customer receiving the goods.

Chris M's Comment
member avatar

I would say it depends on what you're getting back in the upcoming days, not just tomorrow night. If you're consistently getting 9-10 back over the next 4-5 nights then you can be comfortable running recaps. But if you're only getting 2-3 hours back on say Saturday or Sunday night, you may be better off taking the reset now and being ready to run for next week.

Rick S.'s Comment
member avatar

If you can do a reset and make the receiver on time - take the reset.

As others have mentioned, if you can run recaps and get enough time back - it would be an option - but, if you have the option to get it ALL BACK and still make an on time delivery...

Rick

RealDiehl's Comment
member avatar

I appreciate all your input. I'll be getting minimal hours back each day. As of now I don't have any sort of preplan. I will request a reset unless my FM has other plans for me.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
PackRat's Comment
member avatar

If you’re getting minimum hours back for the next several days, I would do the 34 hour reset, too.

Marc Lee's Comment
member avatar

I was going to ask about the "next load" (pre-plan)...

Would the ability to deliver the next load ever figure into such a decision or is it the minimum number of hours coming back (recaps) vs. full new clock that one really only considers in such cases?

JUST DID the HRT HOS module and the 14-hour driving day riddle today.

Really trying to get this stuff!

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HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Stevo Reno's Comment
member avatar
Really trying to get this stuff!

You and me both Marc

Guessing they really don't spend too much time on this stuff in school huh?? Find out soon enough I guess.......

I am "supposed" to be starting on May 20th, now with a local school (Skyway) who is now approved on W.I.O.A program. Least its only about 6 miles from home

Marc Lee's Comment
member avatar

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Really trying to get this stuff!

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You and me both Marc

Well... yes and no! My instruction was a "400 hour" (390ish?) Technical College program. We had to do paper logs for like 3 months... what we did every day (class was only on weekends). Got to be pretty mundane. Lots of "similar" days, but I did the calculations for real. On days I didn't really drive anywhere it was really easy.

Showed drive to class or work... Mostly just on and off duty and commuting. Didn't need to show drive vs. ride time in cab when training on the lot or roads... it was all just "on duty".

At one point I tried to do about 2 weeks of recaps but instructor didn't care. Asked him how to show something, did it the way he said to and he took points off for doing it that way.

The only real up side to it all was I had it down pretty well during training. J.B. Hunt used the ELD when I was driving only so I had to submit paper logs which they scanned and uploaded for days off, non-driving time, etc.. It's how my (hourly) training pay was calculated. I had a nice plastic template I got at a truck stop which worked great - (one of several things I tried)... lined up well with their specific forms.

Trainer was very good about managing his clock and showed me how to do it. Didn't quite get it down though. He would go "on duty" after quick cab pre-trip and aftet starting truck and logging in to ELD. HE would drive to the office, do office things, get assignments, etc.. Pretrip was selected once trailer was connected. I think he stayed on that until we cleared security, entered load info, did routing (pretty much always to somewhere he had been many times before). "Drive line" was selectef when ready to roll. Back to "On duty" for drop and hook activities.

I would forget to go off drive line when stopped at a rest area to use the facilities (long walk in the snow). I would remember my mistake (or he would remind me... forget which) when I returned.

Seems it's mostly about thinking where you are in the process and being aware of everything all the time! Can't let the numerous distractions keep you from getting the basics right. I'm sure it gets easier with practice. Figure in 2-3 years for me... maybe!

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As far as clock management... this is the place to learn it! This is where the pros who are willing to share will take the time to explain it.

Time for a new puzzler???

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BMI:

Body mass index (BMI)

BMI is a formula that uses weight and height to estimate body fat. For most people, BMI provides a reasonable estimate of body fat. The BMI's biggest weakness is that it doesn't consider individual factors such as bone or muscle mass. BMI may:

  • Underestimate body fat for older adults or other people with low muscle mass
  • Overestimate body fat for people who are very muscular and physically fit

It's quite common, especially for men, to fall into the "overweight" category if you happen to be stronger than average. If you're pretty strong but in good shape then pay no attention.

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

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