Swift New Recruits

Topic 25592 | Page 2

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Bruce K.'s Comment
member avatar

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Jim said: "Maybe it's time that you start lifting your tractor and leg pressing your trailer for a workout, lol."

I used to do that, but the company made a policy against it. And I'm not as strong as I used to be, so now I can only lift tankers hauling Helium.

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I guess pull ups using the landing gear is out of the question. I could feel the tires with helium, and it still wouldn't help. I'll just try to mind my manners in the gym.

jim, take my word for it. Show offs don't do well as truck drivers. Driving under the radar is a good practice. (Double meaning intentional!)

Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar
The Coca Cola account doesn't pay bonuses, but the pay is considerably more.

What do you mean pays more? More CPM? Usually if a certain account pays quite a bit more it's due to lower miles.

Also, I know you keep bringing up the coca cola account. Was that an account that had been offered by a recruiter? The longer you take to get going the less likely it will be available once you get going. I understand this is a big decision but you just gotta jump in if you want this. There are a few of us here that kept putting it off. It took me 3 YEARS hanging around this forum before I finally took the leap and I kick myself in the ass all the time for waiting. Are you currently in school? Paid school or private?

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Jim S.'s Comment
member avatar

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I will be taking my CDL soon, and am seriously considering Swift. I like the fact that they have many terminals. I feel that this would be a major convenience and help to avoid truck stops.

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Jim, I'm just curious. Why are you so set against truck stops?

I work for Knight. We've got lots of terminals, but I seldom stay at them unless I'm there for maintenance or repairs.

Part of a successful driver's approach to this job is learning to take advantage of strategic parking locations near or at your shippers and receivers. Many drivers don't seem to realize this and unfortunately you'll probably encounter many of them at the terminal driver's lounge. You'll be able to recognize them right away because they won't stop complaining about how badly the company is treating them, and how they can never get the miles their recruiter promised them.

I think you're way premature on trying to figure out where to park. You haven't even learned how to park yet.

I'm not trying to be critical, but it will do you good to focus on what's critical for you now. You are setting up all kinds of ideas in your head that are going to be obliterated once you get out here in the "real world."

Take this career one step at a time. Right now focus all your efforts on the High Road CDL Training Program. That will keep you busy enough to avoid picking up a bunch of these preconceived ideas you're formulating from your frequenting of trucking forums.

You don't have to settle everything in your mind now - in fact it's a common mistake new entrants into this career stumble over. You are going to be learning a ton of things as you work your way through your rookie year. You don't want to have to re-learn everything that you thought you already had figured out. Ease up on some of the information you're taking in and focus on whatever is critical for the immediate time ahead of you. You'll be better off taking this medicine one spoon at a time, as needed.

I am a cheapskate. If I may have free amenities instead of paying, I am all for that. I realize that some amenities might be provided with fuel credits at truck stops. But, there will probably be times that I don't have enough credits, especially if I travel with my son during the summers. I realize the advantages of parking at or near receivers and shippers, especially if you have a delivery or pick up in the morning, and I will use that advantage. I hear that parking might be none to be found at truck stops. I haven't heard much about terminals. I have nothing against truck stops. In fact, I am looking forward to experiencing them. If things might be a little more accommodating at terminals, I will use that to my advantage. I am still focused on the task at hand right now. I am just trying to be informed for decisions that will be making soon.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Jim S.'s Comment
member avatar

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The Coca Cola account doesn't pay bonuses, but the pay is considerably more.

double-quotes-end.png

What do you mean pays more? More CPM? Usually if a certain account pays quite a bit more it's due to lower miles.

Also, I know you keep bringing up the coca cola account. Was that an account that had been offered by a recruiter? The longer you take to get going the less likely it will be available once you get going. I understand this is a big decision but you just gotta jump in if you want this. There are a few of us here that kept putting it off. It took me 3 YEARS hanging around this forum before I finally took the leap and I kick myself in the ass all the time for waiting. Are you currently in school? Paid school or private?

Yes, it pays more CPM , but no bonus pay. It was offered a few weeks ago by recruiter that came to my school. I spoke again over the phone with the recruiter, and she said route was still available. She said it would pay between $900-1200 per week and home weekly. That is what has me concerned. A route that sounds that good should be easy for them to fulfill. Sounds too good to be true. She also said all d&h. I just finished private CDL school. My test is next week. Schiff has tuition reimbursement.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

OMG...

Jim...honestly man, your interest in the Swift bonus structure is way too premature. Step 30+ in your process. (Reread Old School’s reply to you)

Consider getting your permit as step 1.

If you must know, Swift bonus is progressive; from silver, to gold, to platinum to diamond. It’s totally performance based and requires 100% on time delivery, no preventables and no citations. Diamond also carries a certain time on the road between hone time.

I’ve been Platinum for 5 years; translates to 60 consecutive months of the above performance parameters. You must be with Swift a minimum of 1 Year as a 1st seat driver to be eligible for Platinum. As a Walmart Dedicated driver, since I am effectively local dispatched, same day or next day return to the DC is SOP, Platinum is the highest level available.

When I was about to enter school the bonus structure at Swift was the furthest thought from my mind. You must focus on the immediate when doing this, otherwise you’ll be overwhelmed with information and quickly lose focus. Go to school, pass your CDL and complete the 200 hours (or whatever it is now) of mentoring. Then worry about stuff like this.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Bruce K.'s Comment
member avatar

Jim, all I can speak to is Schneider Operating Centers (aka 'terminals') and drop yards. I prefer these to truck stops because I have always found super easy parking at these. The chance of the dreaded Truck Stop fender bender is also pretty much non-existent. This option will vary from company to company. Truck stops do serve a very important purpose. Personally, I will not try to park at a truck stop after dark, being a rookie, because parking will usually be tight and I am still honing my backing skills. After dark backing is the most difficult for me and I don't want to risk an incident.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Jim S.'s Comment
member avatar

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The Coca Cola account doesn't pay bonuses, but the pay is considerably more.

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

What do you mean pays more? More CPM? Usually if a certain account pays quite a bit more it's due to lower miles.

Also, I know you keep bringing up the coca cola account. Was that an account that had been offered by a recruiter? The longer you take to get going the less likely it will be available once you get going. I understand this is a big decision but you just gotta jump in if you want this. There are a few of us here that kept putting it off. It took me 3 YEARS hanging around this forum before I finally took the leap and I kick myself in the ass all the time for waiting. Are you currently in school? Paid school or private?

double-quotes-end.png

Yes, it pays more CPM , but no bonus pay. It was offered a few weeks ago by recruiter that came to my school. I spoke again over the phone with the recruiter, and she said route was still available. She said it would pay between $900-1200 per week and home weekly. That is what has me concerned. A route that sounds that good should be easy for them to fulfill. Sounds too good to be true. She also said all d&h. I just finished private CDL school. My test is next week. Schiff has tuition reimbursement.

My bad, should be Swift.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Bruce K.'s Comment
member avatar

Jim, study the previous response from G-Town. Just get hired on by Swift, accept their pay structure and get your one year experience. As advised, forget about the peripheral issues and just focus on being the safest driver on the road. Everything else will fall into place as you gain experience.

Jim S.'s Comment
member avatar

OMG...

Jim...honestly man, your interest in the Swift bonus structure is way too premature. Step 30+ in your process. (Reread Old School’s reply to you)

Consider getting your permit as step 1.

If you must know, Swift bonus is progressive; from silver, to gold, to platinum to diamond. It’s totally performance based and requires 100% on time delivery, no preventables and no citations. Diamond also carries a certain time on the road between hone time.

I’ve been Platinum for 5 years; translates to 60 consecutive months of the above performance parameters. You must be with Swift a minimum of 1 Year as a 1st seat driver to be eligible for Platinum. As a Walmart Dedicated driver, since I am effectively local dispatched, same day or next day return to the DC is SOP, Platinum is the highest level available.

When I was about to enter school the bonus structure at Swift was the furthest thought from my mind. You must focus on the immediate when doing this, otherwise you’ll be overwhelmed with information and quickly lose focus. Go to school, pass your CDL and complete the 200 hours (or whatever it is now) of mentoring. Then worry about stuff like this.

I just finished my CDL school, and will take my test next week. I am hoping to choose a company very soon after passing my test and want to be informed. The Swift recruiter said that I may choose the Coca Cola route at orientation time, even before I start my OTR mentoring. That I why I am looking for information now. If the CC account is really that good, I will have to jump on it before it's not available anymore. Your explanation of the bonus program is helpful. Since it is progressive and will take time to accomplish, that makes the CC look more attractive, since it starts at a pretty high pay.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Jim S.'s Comment
member avatar

Jim, all I can speak to is Schneider Operating Centers (aka 'terminals') and drop yards. I prefer these to truck stops because I have always found super easy parking at these. The chance of the dreaded Truck Stop fender bender is also pretty much non-existent. This option will vary from company to company. Truck stops do serve a very important purpose. Personally, I will not try to park at a truck stop after dark, being a rookie, because parking will usually be tight and I am still honing my backing skills. After dark backing is the most difficult for me and I don't want to risk an incident.

This is the type of information that is helpful. I hear so much about truck stops, but not terminals. Also, parking at shippers or receivers seems like a good idea, or even outside of their facilities, paralleled on the street. Do most terminals have fuel? If so, saving your company fuel cost might put you in their graces.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

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