My Understanding Of The Split Sleeper Berth Rule

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Grumpy Old Man's Comment
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About to find out if I understand it.

I woke up this morning to weather alerts and having been through weather that was almost a tornado ( warning said tornado imminent take shelter now) and being thrown to the ground by the wind, I looked st my clock and saw I had 8 hours available and beat feet.

Taking my 2 hour now, hoping I am correct that my 11 and my 14 clocks will restart at the end of my 9 hours in sleeper berth this morning.

Otherwise I will be driving all night, which I hate.

Oh yes, and to whoever it was that suggested the night glasses, they do help a bit.

Sleeper Berth:

The portion of the tractor behind the seats which acts as the "living space" for the driver. It generally contains a bed (or bunk beds), cabinets, lights, temperature control knobs, and 12 volt plugs for power.

NeeklODN's Comment
member avatar

About to find out if I understand it.

I woke up this morning to weather alerts and having been through weather that was almost a tornado ( warning said tornado imminent take shelter now) and being thrown to the ground by the wind, I looked st my clock and saw I had 8 hours available and beat feet.

Taking my 2 hour now, hoping I am correct that my 11 and my 14 clocks will restart at the end of my 9 hours in sleeper berth this morning.

Otherwise I will be driving all night, which I hate.

Oh yes, and to whoever it was that suggested the night glasses, they do help a bit.

When you take an 8 hour break, you get back exactly what you had prior to said break. You drive for a while and take the 2 hour, you get back the remainder, correct experienced drivers?

Sleeper Berth:

The portion of the tractor behind the seats which acts as the "living space" for the driver. It generally contains a bed (or bunk beds), cabinets, lights, temperature control knobs, and 12 volt plugs for power.

Bruce K.'s Comment
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Grump, what are "beat feet" ? Did you mean to say "feel beat"?????

Pete E Pothole's Comment
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Grump, what are "beat feet" ? Did you mean to say "feel beat"?????

Beat feet= hauled ass=got outta there

Old School's Comment
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Taking my 2 hour now, hoping I am correct that my 11 and my 14 clocks will restart at the end of my 9 hours in sleeper berth this morning.

I don't think you understand it yet. You may be a Grumpy Old Man when you see what your clock looks like after that nap.

Sleeper Berth:

The portion of the tractor behind the seats which acts as the "living space" for the driver. It generally contains a bed (or bunk beds), cabinets, lights, temperature control knobs, and 12 volt plugs for power.

Mark B.'s Comment
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When you take an 8 hour break, you get back exactly what you had prior to said break. You drive for a while and take the 2 hour, you get back the remainder, correct experienced drivers?

double-quotes-end.png

Sounds correct to me. Make sure that the 8 hour breaks are logged as 8 consecutive hours on "Sleeper Berth" - no "Off Duty" time will count toward this reset. When you take a full 10hr break, it will reset your 11/14hr clocks to their normal start times and break the cycle.

A good way to run this is:

  • 8hrs On Duty + Drive
  • 8hrs consecutive SB
  • 2hrs On Duty + Drive
  • 2hrs SB+Off Duty

Wash, Rinse, Repeat.

You could technically keep doing this until your 70hr clock runs out, but I wouldn't recommend it. It gets tiring. Split Sleeper works best for coast-to-coast team operations where two drivers alternate shifts to keep the truck rolling as much as possible. Also, communicate with your DM/FM about what you are doing because it can confuse your load planners when they try to predict your availability for future loads.

Sleeper Berth:

The portion of the tractor behind the seats which acts as the "living space" for the driver. It generally contains a bed (or bunk beds), cabinets, lights, temperature control knobs, and 12 volt plugs for power.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Rubber Duck's Comment
member avatar

When you get to the wash rinse repeat what do you mean. You made a nice easy to understand example but what will your clock look like at the wash rinse repeat.

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

When you take an 8 hour break, you get back exactly what you had prior to said break. You drive for a while and take the 2 hour, you get back the remainder, correct experienced drivers?

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

Sounds correct to me. Make sure that the 8 hour breaks are logged as 8 consecutive hours on "Sleeper Berth" - no "Off Duty" time will count toward this reset. When you take a full 10hr break, it will reset your 11/14hr clocks to their normal start times and break the cycle.

A good way to run this is:

  • 8hrs On Duty + Drive
  • 8hrs consecutive SB
  • 2hrs On Duty + Drive
  • 2hrs SB+Off Duty

Wash, Rinse, Repeat.

You could technically keep doing this until your 70hr clock runs out, but I wouldn't recommend it. It gets tiring. Split Sleeper works best for coast-to-coast team operations where two drivers alternate shifts to keep the truck rolling as much as possible. Also, communicate with your DM/FM about what you are doing because it can confuse your load planners when they try to predict your availability for future loads.

Sleeper Berth:

The portion of the tractor behind the seats which acts as the "living space" for the driver. It generally contains a bed (or bunk beds), cabinets, lights, temperature control knobs, and 12 volt plugs for power.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
NeeklODN's Comment
member avatar

In his example, once you take the eight, you get the two you had remaining when you go into sleeper. Then, assuming you drive/on duty two hours after, you take the two hour sleepy. After that, you gain back the 8 you had at the start of the cycle. Drive that, then sleep 8, gain 2, then sleep 2 gain 8...etc until you can do a full 10.

Or if you did it like this:

Drive/on duty for 6 hours (5 drive hours remaining) Shut down in sleeper berth for 8 hours which gives you back the 5 you had left. Drive that. Shut down in sleeper berth for two hours. You gain the 6 you used at the start of the cycle. Drive that. Shut down for 8 hours get the five again.....get it Jamie?

Do this until your 70 runs out or you take a full 10

Sleeper Berth:

The portion of the tractor behind the seats which acts as the "living space" for the driver. It generally contains a bed (or bunk beds), cabinets, lights, temperature control knobs, and 12 volt plugs for power.

NeeklODN's Comment
member avatar

I meant rubber duck, not Jamie what the heck

Mark B.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

When you get to the wash rinse repeat what do you mean. You made a nice easy to understand example but what will your clock look like at the wash rinse repeat.

double-quotes-end.png

So this won't be as simple, but really nothing about Split Sleeper is simple... While you must get 10 hours of break time, with at least 8 of those hours in the Sleeper, you don't strictly have to do 8/2hrs working, there are other ways to split it up. Notice that I do not take a 30 minute break. It can get really complicated, this is just an example.

E.G., starting a fresh shift following a 10hr reset:

1st 8 hours total working ; 1 hr spent On-Duty, 7 hours driving ; remaining 11hr clock -> 04:00 ; remaining 14 hr clock -> 06:00
1st 8 hour break ; After 8 hours consecutive Sleeper Berth , my clocks reset to the times remaining when I made a status change to "SB"
11hr clock -> 04:00 ; 14 hr clock -> 06:00 to start the next stint.

2nd work period is 3 hrs Driving ; remaining 11hr clock -> 01:00 ; remaining 14 hr clock -> 03:00
2 hour break ; 2 hours Off Duty + SB

At the end of the 2 hour break, because I have completed a total of 10 hours off duty, my clocks gain back everything since the end of the first 8 hr break period. Basically, whatever the time was at the end of that first 8 hour break, my 14hr clock now starts from then. Since that time, I have used 3 hours of 11hr clock and 5 hours of 14hr clock (the 14hr clock is not paused by the short break).
I could start a new 8/2 cycle beginning with 11hr clock -> 08:00 ; 14hr clock -> 09:00 and repeat the 8/2 split.

You can take the long break (8 hours SB) or the short break (2 hours Off+SB) first, doesn't matter. But again, without a teammate I would break the cycle with a 10hr reset. I only run "Eights & Twos" when I have a weird appointment time and I triple check my HOS before I end my breaks.

If this seems like word salad, I get it. The best explanation/examples of this that I have ever seen is in that $5 J.J. Keller "HOS" manual that you can buy at most truck stops.

Sleeper Berth:

The portion of the tractor behind the seats which acts as the "living space" for the driver. It generally contains a bed (or bunk beds), cabinets, lights, temperature control knobs, and 12 volt plugs for power.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

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