I Have Hit The 1 Year OTR Mark

Topic 25746 | Page 1

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Tractor Man's Comment
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It's official. I now have 12 months of OTR experience, although it took me 3 years to do it. I have accomplished it with the same Company. In over 100,000 miles, I have a 100% on time pick up/delivery record. No tickets, accidents, incidents, or DOT violations. It can be done. I have driven OTR, Regional and Dedicated. I am currently running Walmart Dedicated Grocery out of the McCarran, NV. DC.

Although I prefer to drive lower 48 OTR, Swift just does not have consistent OTR miles, One week 2900 miles.......the next week 1600 miles. It is all over the place. The situation is not unique to me, many other drivers have dealt with the same predicament. The paychecks on the WM Dedicated are much more consistent. Average $1200 per week with mileage and stop pay. Although the pay is good, I find running the same routes day after day to become quite tedious. I know many Drivers are content with the routine, but I prefer the "Adventure" of traveling the Country. I live in my Truck and like to run for 10-14 weeks at a stretch, seeing what there is to see on the occasional 34. I go back to Tucson, my home town, every 3 months or so to have a quick visit with my Son and Daughter in law, and Sister and Brother in law. With Swift, quarterly bonuses are based on basically, time with the Company, On Time ratings and mileage. In order to reach "Platinum" level, you must average roughly 2280 miles per week for the quarter and 99.5% on time, to earn an a $.05 bonus. The bar is nit even set very high, yet, staying out for an entire quarter, it seems difficult to achieve. I have spoken to my DL about OTR miles and he tells me the drivers on his board are averaging 1800-2200 miles per week. I got the old "But you can become a Mentor and make good money speech". Here's the deal, I do NOT want to be a Mentor, not for me, nothing against those that do it. I prefer to drive solo and have my time and space. So.......I will continue to run Wally loads through the summer, and see how things shake out. Just wanted to share the news with the TT Community. I have now changed my Status to Experienced Driver. I wish there were an option for "Not quite a Rookie anymore" or " A Bit More Experienced Driver". None the less, Thanks to many of y'all on this board for your stories, wisdom and wit!

Tractor Man

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Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
PackRat's Comment
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Congratulations to you!

Time for bananas dancing-banana.gifdancing-banana.gifdancing-banana.gifdancing-banana.gifdancing-banana.gif

Marc Lee's Comment
member avatar

Way to go Tractor Man!

3 years to get 1? Must be a story there?!?

Congratulations!

dancing-banana.gifdancing-dog.gifdancing.gif

Turtle's Comment
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Awesome, congrats T-Man.

NeeklODN's Comment
member avatar

Good job tractor supply, I mean Tractor Man. Sorry....

I have a question concerning on time deliveries. My company is smaller and doesn't have the same structure as some of the companies y'all drive for. Ok so you pick up a load and have just enough time to get it to receiver at appt time the next day. Now let's say you hit traffic in a non expected place. Like an accident. Let's say you call and let dispatcher know. Would that count against your %100 on time deliveries?

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Cwc's Comment
member avatar

Good job tractor supply, I mean Tractor Man. Sorry....

I have a question concerning on time deliveries. My company is smaller and doesn't have the same structure as some of the companies y'all drive for. Ok so you pick up a load and have just enough time to get it to receiver at appt time the next day. Now let's say you hit traffic in a non expected place. Like an accident. Let's say you call and let dispatcher know. Would that count against your %100 on time deliveries?

NeekIODN from my experience, smaller companies sometimes run the schedule a bit tighter than the larger companies. So where you might only have 9.5 -10 hours (drive time) to get 600 miles. Someone working for a larger carrier may have an extra 4 or 5hours. Not always but.. When you have more trucks to cover loads you can give them a bit more breathing room.

With that said a little traffic shouldn't throw you off to much. And mechanical issues out of your control shouldn't go against your ontime record. (Like picking up a neglected trailer.)

What messes with your ontime record is poor use of hours, too much downtime (12hrs in sleeper) or bad route planning.

Reading the load messages should have you well aware of any routing issues. Other than that... From reading some of your other posts you seem like the kinda person that need not worry about your ontime record... I think you'll do just fine.

And I share Tractors sentiment on there needing an in between step for Rookie solo to experienced driver.... I'm coming up on 4 years and still... Rookie status. I've meet to many 20yr veterans and just can't seem to call myself experienced.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Greg H.'s Comment
member avatar

Good job tractor supply, I mean Tractor Man. Sorry....

I have a question concerning on time deliveries. My company is smaller and doesn't have the same structure as some of the companies y'all drive for. Ok so you pick up a load and have just enough time to get it to receiver at appt time the next day. Now let's say you hit traffic in a non expected place. Like an accident. Let's say you call and let dispatcher know. Would that count against your %100 on time deliveries?

Congrats, Tractor Man! I'm ruffly at the 1 year mark (All OTR), with Swift.

I hear you, on everything you mentioned. I wonder about achieving Platinum status and then becoming a Diamond driver. Not that I personally care myself. I'm blessed just getting a pay check every week, and having a great career. But, don't you know that those who do become Diamond Drivers, they must be best buddies with the planners! Haha 🙂 Mmmm, as for the Mentoring, I'll get back to you.

Anyway, I quoted NeekIODN because I know the answer! lol. No, it only counts against you if it is your fault, and you have no good excuse. At least, it hasn't been counted against me so far. I've been late a few times. Illinois for example, I was snowed in. I was only 30 miles from my delivery but, I was lucky to make it that far when I found a place to shut down. Late due to an accident in Albuquerque but, my DM didn't let it count against me. Anyway, various reasons but, they haven't put me as being late, when I have a good reason. Still holding at 100% on time delivery.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
PackRat's Comment
member avatar

Good to hear from you Greg H.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Congratulations Tractor!

I respect what you have done and the obstacles overcome to get here. Well done!

NeeklODN's Comment
member avatar

Ah ok I see. Actually, my company has HUGE widows for delivery....like a whole day. I Always deliver early though. Anyway don't want o jack his post! Congrats again TMAN!

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