Trucker Safety

Topic 25786 | Page 1

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Dorsey K.'s Comment
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Hi there. I'm writing an article about the dangers faced by over-the-road truckers and how they can avoid becoming victims of crime. If anybody wants to share their stories of close calls (or worse) I'd be most appreciative.

PackRat's Comment
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The biggest danger we face is the general motoring public every day. Many, many drivers of cars are doing everything except paying attention to their driving. Texting, eating, watching movies, kids, speeding, tailgating, improper passing, etc. are some of these distractions.

Lack of education of the general public concerning how to drive around big rigs is another huge problem. Better than 80% of crashes involving a small vehicle and an 18 wheeler are caused by the car driver. Who always gets blamed first, though? The evil truck driver.

Bruce K.'s Comment
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Well Dorsey, truckers are victims of crime. It's just part of the job. Underpaid, overworked and unappreciated. Other than that, I've never had an issue with crime.

Errol V.'s Comment
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Packrat is right:

The biggest danger we face is the general motoring public every day.

This is part of basic CDL training. Personal safety not so much. You could use the search bar above (the blank space just under the Trucking Truth title) and search for "truck stop safety" and such. They're are several topics of this.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
PackRat's Comment
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Packrat is right:

double-quotes-start.png

The biggest danger we face is the general motoring public every day.

double-quotes-end.png

This is part of basic CDL training. Personal safety not so much. You could use the search bar above (the blank space just under the Trucking Truth title) and search for "truck stop safety" and such. They're are several topics of this.

Well, gee Errol, thanks!

As if I’d ever be wrong......smhrofl-3.gifrofl-3.gifrofl-3.gif

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
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Bruce K.'s Comment
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I always felt as safe in my truck as I do in my house. And I live in a very safe, quiet neighborhood. But, as PackRat and Errol stated, driving down the road is our most hazardous activity. I seem to remember a comment recently posted about crime in southern California where it was not a good idea for a driver to stop. So inner city driving might be dangerous.

Dorsey K.'s Comment
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Thanks for the replies everybody! I'm mostly looking about stories involving crime; assault, robbery, etc. I wish you all the best. But if any of you have been the victims of crime (or a close call) I'd be interested in hearing your story. This piece is for a four-part series in Concealed Carry Magazine. If anybody wants to reach out, my email is dorsey.kindler@gmail.com

PackRat's Comment
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You’re not going to find many on here that carry on their company owned truck. It’s against 99% of the trucking company’s policy to have any firearms on their vehicles, persons, or property. In addition, nearly every shipper or receiver has signs posted for “No Firearms Allowed”. I’m a life member of the NRA, so I’m not anti-gun in the least.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Mr. Curmudgeon's Comment
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Dorsey, I am federally qualified to carry a concealed firearm over about 95% of the United States. That said, I don't carry a firearm when I am driving, as PackRat indicated. Trucking Company Policies are written by people very in tune to the concept of "Liability". Given that trucking outfits are generally viewed as being deep in the pockets, anything that could even whiff of liability for the outfit is stomped into non-existence by policies. I had a near miss about a year ago, on a road in the middle of nowhere. Didn't have a pistol. Didn't need it, ultimately, but one never closes their eyes to the potential.

Another consideration that you should be aware of is the frequency of "NO FIREARMS ALLOWED ON THIS PREMISE" at shippers and receivers. If something happens on one of these properties, and it turns out that a driver was armed in violation of those posted signs (at least in IL, and I suspect many other states) the driver is potentially looking at a felony offense. Delivering to a military base or federal installation? Vehicle interior subject to search, if unlawful carrying - Federal Felony Offense. There goes the Hazmat endorsement... smile.gif Many pitfalls...

A source that you may consider contacting is the Owner Operator Independent Driver's Association. They cater to a clientele comprised largely of owner operators, and the rules for an O/O are often different.

Good luck to you.

I am an NRA Lifer as well...

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Owner Operator:

An owner-operator is a driver who either owns or leases the truck they are driving. A self-employed driver.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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