Job Search And Training NOT GOING STALE Update!

Topic 25825 | Page 2

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Bruce K.'s Comment
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That is very positive news. You could go with any number of companies, but your location fits in well with Schneider.

Marc Lee's Comment
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That is very positive news. You could go with any number of companies, but your location fits in well with Schneider.

Looks like a pretty solid move, especially given my situation. OTR - 37 States probably better than Regional 7 anyway. Supposedly nothing West of TX and hopefully they won't make my early runs to the streets built for horses and buggies in the 1700's or so!

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Craig L.'s Comment
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That is pretty cool. I guess if training did go stale, one could always apply to mega which current CDL and they'll probably hire you with a refresher and you I am guessing one could stay on for a couple months then leave for a better opportunity.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
PackRat's Comment
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That is pretty cool. I guess if training did go stale, one could always apply to mega which current CDL and they'll probably hire you with a refresher and you I am guessing one could stay on for a couple months then leave for a better opportunity.

That makes no sense. Hire on, start at the bottom, stay there a couple months, go somewhere else, start at the bottom again?

That’s what we call a job hopper and looks very bad on a resume, has no benefit, and is strongly discouraged here on the site.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Marc Lee's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

That is pretty cool. I guess if training did go stale, one could always apply to mega which current CDL and they'll probably hire you with a refresher and you I am guessing one could stay on for a couple months then leave for a better opportunity.

double-quotes-end.png

That makes no sense. Hire on, start at the bottom, stay there a couple months, go somewhere else, start at the bottom again?

That’s what we call a job hopper and looks very bad on a resume, has no benefit, and is strongly discouraged here on the site.

As was already pointed out here... I sort of already have 2 strikes against me!

Funny thing is Schneider (said anyway) they are giving me credit for my "2-months" with JBH! (I think it was a penny or two per mile for 3 weeks driving/training and the 2 more weeks it took them to can me.

My hope and plan is to do well for and stay with whomever gives me the opportunity which I think will work for me.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Stevo Reno's Comment
member avatar

Great news Marc !! Good luck moving forward......

Now go to BED !! rofl-1.gifrofl-1.gif

PackRat's Comment
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Now go to BED !! rofl-1.gifrofl-1.gif

Friday and Saturday night he gets to stay up an extra hour.

Marc Lee's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

That is pretty cool. I guess if training did go stale, one could always apply to mega which current CDL and they'll probably hire you with a refresher and you I am guessing one could stay on for a couple months then leave for a better opportunity.

double-quotes-end.png

That makes no sense. Hire on, start at the bottom, stay there a couple months, go somewhere else, start at the bottom again?

That’s what we call a job hopper and looks very bad on a resume, has no benefit, and is strongly discouraged here on the site.

Actually with 4 months of experience I could go to Averitt... the people who never responded to an application or inquiry or to JB Hunt (the people who gave me my first opportunity which I messed up and were willing to take me back but ultimately were unable to do so)...

Question though is WHY WOULD I DO THAT???

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Army 's Comment
member avatar

So when are you scheduled or trying to get scheduled to head out?

Rainy 's Comment
member avatar

Averitt is a great company that gets you home on weekends.

However, I have a friend who decided to team with his trainer after upgrading at Prime. They stayed together a whole.year. When he went solo, I tried to help.him with time management and trip.planning. He couldnt hack it and 3 months later went teaming with someone else. After another few months he went to Averitt cause his wife wanted him home more.

Guess what? With 18 months of driving of which only 3 months was solo, he was expected to be an experienced driver. The problem is that most of his driving experience had someone else making the decisions.

He loved Averitt as a company, but he did not have the experience to handle the high pressure of short delivery windows, time and HOS management, and local driving. It was always rush rush rush. Because of that, he had 2 accidents in 3 months. He got nervous and distracted.

Not good. He got fired. So get Averitt or similar companies out of your mind until you have the knowledge and skills to produce for them without having accidents and getting fired.

From the very beginning Marc, you did not want to go to a starter company, but due to circimstamces beyond your control, you probably will have to. It is the companies without their own schooling program who will consider your schooling stale. Someone like Swift Schneider or Prime will probably evaluate you and adjust your training time. At Prime you would still have to do 60,000 miles of team training an additional 10,000 over anyone who went to their school.

Get a job. Learn as much as possible, wait a year then see how you feel. You might be surprised to find a home at one of the large carriers you werent interested in before. Take one step at a time.

Also be prepared to go through that entire diabetic waiver form hoop jumping every year, or anytime you need a new med card. THAT was the real reason you were fired from JB Hunt. Not the injury.

So have you come up with a solution of how to handle that? Otherwise, next year you will go through the same thing.

One possibity... find out which companies have their own in house doctors. Prime has a doctor office right in the terminal and they take our insurance. Using them for the diabetes management and forms would make a huge difference for you. I know people with diabetes and blood pressure issues that find it much better to be routed to the terminal for any issues and not have to use home time for that stuff.

I am sure there are other companies with doctors. Ask around.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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