FMCSA Publishes Proposed HOS Rule Changes

Topic 26322 | Page 2

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Grumpy Old Man's Comment
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I believe the rule changes will help as it will allow the flexibility to use my fueling, scaling, drop and hook time as part of my 30 minute break instead of sitting an extra 30 minutes. It will also be helpful, in my opinion, to be able to pause your 14 hour clock for up to 3 hours, to nap, avoid rush hour, or whatever, where as the 8/2 split... that 2 hour segment didn't pause anything.

I honestly believe it's a step forward in allowing more flexibility and will be good for drivers who are savvy enough to use it to their advantage.

I agree. I run out my 14 way more often than my 11, but I am hourly. No idea how it affects mileage drivers

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

Grumpy, I'm paid by the mile. I was discussing the new rules with my safety director the other day. You would indeed be able to count that set hookup as part of your break, if your company is going to allow that. And I love the idea I can stop my 14 hour clock for UP TO 3 HOURS. So that is extremely flexible. It's not a set mandated period of time for that. I believe we will also still have a split break (sleeper berth) component.

So yes, I'm excited and thinking this is a huge step forward to work around that crazy 14 hour clock, and my safety director agreed that this would be a big deal for our drivers. We just have to wait until FMCSA gives the official OK to use these new rules.

Sleeper Berth:

The portion of the tractor behind the seats which acts as the "living space" for the driver. It generally contains a bed (or bunk beds), cabinets, lights, temperature control knobs, and 12 volt plugs for power.

CSA:

Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA)

The CSA is a Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) initiative to improve large truck and bus safety and ultimately reduce crashes, injuries, and fatalities that are related to commercial motor vehicle

FMCSA:

Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration

The FMCSA was established within the Department of Transportation on January 1, 2000. Their primary mission is to prevent commercial motor vehicle-related fatalities and injuries.

What Does The FMCSA Do?

  • Commercial Drivers' Licenses
  • Data and Analysis
  • Regulatory Compliance and Enforcement
  • Research and Technology
  • Safety Assistance
  • Support and Information Sharing

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

Oh and Rick.. my company, West Side Transport.. their main focus IS short haul regional , so this is a very big deal for us. When I'm running short hauls, I'll sometimes do up to 3 pickups and 3 deliveries (all drop and hook) in a single drive shift. I don't often do lots of days of those, but I certainly have at times to fill a need. Those things are excellent money at my company, but a lot of work lol, so we have drivers who refuse to do the shorter hauls claiming they can't get good miles or make money doing them. You sure can't waste time and they're more work than a longer single run, but the fact is, for us, shorter runs pay a much higher rate.

I don't want to do them every single day, but I'm not complaining at all when I'm in an area that has shorter haul needs. I can still turn 500+ miles in a shift doing those, providing I waste no time and It's a quick in and out and almost every stop.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Grumpy Old Man's Comment
member avatar

I can think of 4 times in the 5 months I’ve been driving when I was short less than an hour to get home, and all were because my 14 ran out first.

And another couple where I had to sleep in less than desirable places for the same reason. Like a busy yard with trailers being dropped every few minutes. I barely slept.

I may do 3 or 4 drop and hooks in a day. I did 4 loads in one day once, for close to 600 miles. I was so far ahead of schedule I had to sit a day, because it was the weekend and the load plannner was off. After that they started loading me up for the whole week, and if I get ahead they add more on Monday.

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

Exactly, Grumpy. I really believe this will be a huge step forward for drivers regardless of whether they are hourly or paid cpm.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Bruce K.'s Comment
member avatar

I certainly agree with everyone that the "not able to pause" 14 hour clock rule is one of the dumbest rules ever in the history of dumb.

The new changes are just "proposed changes", correct? When will they go into effect?????

Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

They are the proposed changes. There will be a 45 day comment period, then will take a couple more months before they go into effect.

Rick S.'s Comment
member avatar

I certainly agree with everyone that the "not able to pause" 14 hour clock rule is one of the dumbest rules ever in the history of dumb.

The new changes are just "proposed changes", correct? When will they go into effect?????

Yes - they are proposed - then there is a "comment period" - then they meet again and decide whether or not to implement.

Changes in regs like these, usually take years and years.

Some of the trucking associations with $$ & political leverage, lobby and battle for and against. For the most part - input from ACTUAL DRIVERS is pretty much largely ignored. As with anything to do with politics & big business - the $$'s always wins out.

The main change I see here - is adding ways to freeze the 14 clock, and this can be an obvious advantage to many.

It doesn't do much good to fantasize about what changes we'd LIKE TO SEE - but just see what changes might be coming down the road, and how they would be POSITIVE CHANGES FOR US - the drivers. The company will ALWAYS BACK CHANGES that can make them more $$. Whether or not they are to OUR ADVANTAGE (or are sold to us in that light), will reveal itself after they are implemented.

Rick

Shannon C.'s Comment
member avatar

Maybe if the trucking industry starting putting some money into one of the pivotal components of what is making them money (the drivers), they will see less accidents, happy employees, and better management and flexibility of their employees' time (more timely deliveries), which can lead to better employee retention rates, better customer satisfaction, and more jobs and the cycle goes on.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

Maybe if the trucking industry starting putting some money into one of the pivotal components of what is making them money (the drivers), they will see less accidents, happy employees, and better management and flexibility of their employees' time (more timely deliveries), which can lead to better employee retention rates, better customer satisfaction, and more jobs and the cycle goes on.

Any examples of trucking companies not doing this? What has your experience been so far in this industry?

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