First CDL Attempt, Failed

Topic 26636 | Page 1

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Moe's Comment
member avatar

Hi all

I just wanted to post the update that I did not pass my exam today. I pointed out in 90 degree backing and what hurt me was doing too many pull ups during the offset.

I am going to a private school now and am awaiting to hear back when I can retrain in backing and when I can retest.

I passed my pretrip and air brakes inspection, the good thing is in Oregon once you pass pretrip and airbrakes, you do not have re exam those again. So all I need to do I get the backing down and have a successful drive and I will have my CDL.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Yup, the fabled 90 strikes again! I admit I don't like doing them and I'm a CDL instructor! Pull ups are a tool to adjust your tandems to be in a better place. Is that the problem? Or do the tandems like to go after that Key Cone?

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

Read this it will make you feel better. I was a 3 time loser.

Failed the CDL Exam? Dont Sweat It

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Stevo Reno's Comment
member avatar

I found them 90 alley docks ,,,,ain't too bad IF you have a good reference for a starting point....Blind side parallels are worse lol

Moe's Comment
member avatar

Hey Errol

I'm just now getting back to you on this question you asked. For me it was basically getting the tandems aligned so that I wouldn't break the box a 2 point hit. If it helps to know what kind of trailer my school uses , we are using short 28 footers (which bounce like hell all over when you back) and tend to swing more so than a 53 footer. Not only that but the state examiner test site is out on a gravel lot and the backing yard is not level (on an incline).

I have been taught by my instructor to read the side of my trailer like the barrel of a gun, where the end of the trailer is pointed that is where she will end up.

I retest next Saturday and have practice days this week and next....

Am I giving enough info and being clear enough? I hope so, if I am not making sense please inform me and I will do my best to answer...

Yup, the fabled 90 strikes again! I admit I don't like doing them and I'm a CDL instructor! Pull ups are a tool to adjust your tandems to be in a better place. Is that the problem? Or do the tandems like to go after that Key Cone?

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Moe's Comment
member avatar

Thank you for sharing that. I did sub to your you tube channel and have found your content to be well put together. You also gave me a swift kick to my butt about 18 months ago when I was starting my journey toward trucking , had to set my attitude straight.

Thank you for all you do for drivers and aspiring drivers

Read this it will make you feel better. I was a 3 time loser.

Failed the CDL Exam? Dont Sweat It

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Well, Moses, most of us are doing the 53' trailers. True, the pups work much faster than the long ones.

I'm going to have to suggest your instructor isn't quite right.

Where the end of the trailer is pointed that is where she will end up.

This is fine unless your tractor is bent on the trailer (not straight on). If the tractor is bent to a different direction than the trailer, once you start backing you will be pushing the trailer in a new direction. That's why your trailer likes that cone at the "front" end of the box. So it's not a straight line thing, you need to see a curve.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Moses, just keep at it - you'll get it done. Remember, they aren't looking for perfection. Just don't break any of the rules. The guy who passes on his 3rd or 4th try gets the same license as the guy who is flawless with his first attempt, and neither of those scenarios have any indication of how your success at trucking will be. We have seen plenty of drivers really struggling with passing their driving tests go on to become very good truck drivers.

Relax, and be confident. I recommend mentally visualizing yourself executing perfect 90 degree backing maneuvers. Believe it or not, that actually helps some people. Go get that CDL!

There's dancing bananas just waiting for your announcement!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

Thank you for sharing that. I did sub to your you tube channel and have found your content to be well put together. You also gave me a swift kick to my butt about 18 months ago when I was starting my journey toward trucking , had to set my attitude straight.

Thank you for all you do for drivers and aspiring drivers

Well thank you... and well... my big mouth tends to give a lot of swift kicks. It is meant to help, so im.glad you took it that way ;)

now go pass that test and start learning and earning. Then go help others next year ;)

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